Suffixes in Learning for READING

an, ian, ese, ary, ory, and ery

By: Jennifer Lydick

SUFFIX: (an) ORPHAN

Part of speech: Noun
Means: child who lost both parents
I know someone who use to be an orphan.

SUFFIX: (ian) DALMATIAN

Part of speech: Noun
Means: a large dog breed having a smooth white coat with black spots
I saw a dalmatian at the fire house.

SUFFIX: (ese) SIAMESE

Part of speech: Noun
Means: short hair blue-eye breed of cat having a pale coat with dark ears, paws, face, and tail tip
She has a Siamese cat named Blue

SUFFIX: (ary) CULINARY

Part of speech: Adjective
Means: to go to school to learn how to cook
My brother graduated from Jeff Tech with a culinary degree.

SUFFIX: (ory) MEMORY

Part of speech: Noun
Means: something that you remember by using your brain
I have a good memory of having fun at camp.

SUFFIX: (ery) LOTTERY

Part of speech: Noun
Means: a chance in an event
I wish I could win the lottery.

What happens to the meaning of the word when a suffix is added to it?

When a suffix is added to a word the meaning of the word can sometimes change and sometime the meaning does not change.

Example of the meaning not changing is when you change a singular word to a plural word.
cat-cats box-boxes can-cans
these meanings do not change

Example of the meaning of the word changing is when you change the word from present tense to past tense. The new word has a new meaning and sometimes a new part of speech.
help-helpful treat-treatment penny-penniless
these meanings do change