Plate Boundries

Convergent, Divergent, And Transform Boundaries.

Convergent- Oceanic to continental

Where a dense oceanic plate collides with a less-dense continental plate, the oceanic plate is typically thrust underneath because of the greater buoyancy of the continental lithosphere, forming a subduction zone. At the surface, the topographic expression is commonly an oceanic trench on the ocean side and a mountain range on the continental side.

Continental to Continental

Where two continental plates collide the plates either buckle and compress or (in some cases) one plate delves called subduction, under the other. Either action will create extensive mountain ranges.
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Ocean to Ocean

When two plates with oceanic crust converge, they typically create an island arc as one plate is subducted below the other. The arc is formed from volcanoes which erupt through the overriding plate as the descending plate melts below it.
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Divergent Boundaries

Rift-a rift is a linear zone where the Earth's crust and lithosphere are being pulled apart.


Ridge-A ridge is a geological feature consisting of a chain of mountains or hills that form a continuous elevated crest for some distance.

Transform Boundaries

these faults neither create nor destroy lithosphere, is a type of fault whose relative motion is predominantly horizontal in either sinistral or dextral direction. Furthermore, transform faults end abruptly and are connected on both ends to other faults, ridges, or subduction zones.[
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