Ancient Roman FAQ's

Felix Livers

Writing

Papyrus is the most similar to modern paper of the writing items used in Ancient Rome but papyrus was mainly fro the rich because the process was a lot of work. They also used bark and animal skins. The most common writing utensils were clay or wood tablets covered in wax, a stick was used to indent the wax with words or what the user wanted to put on the tablet. the tablet could be reused by flattening the wax to its original position.

Family

Slaves were vary common in Rome. Some slaves were treated like family members, not like slaves. The oldest father still alive in the family had all the power, he was known as "Patria Potestas".

During this time the women in the family had no political power. When a woman gave birth the father had to decide whether to raise the child or not. This was done by putting the child at the feet of the father 9 days after the birth of the child and if he picked up the child then they would raise the child if not then the mother would have to get rid of the child at the local trash dump. A lot of babies didn't live long after birth because of lack of modern medicine.

Most men's names had "a"'s at the end. Married women use their fathers name as their last name. their was a limited amount of first names so some people had repeated names. Some names were based on numbers because they were the third fourth fifth so on person with that name.

Clothing - Men's and boys'

Clothing - Women's and girls'

Citations

Writing

"Books and Manuscripts." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 98-100. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

Family

"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Names, Roman System of." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 3. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 66-67. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"The Nature of the Family." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 324-325. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

Girls Dress

"The Dress of Roman Women." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 106-109. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.


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Men's and boys' dress

Tortora, Phyllis. "Toga." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. Ed. Valerie Steele. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 329-331. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.


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