Corrie Ten Boom

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Cornelia "Corrie" ten Boom was born in Haarlem, Netherlands, in 1892, and grew up in a devoutly religious family. She was the youngest child with two older sister, and one older brother. Cornelia was named after her mother. After the death of her mother, Corrie trained to be a watchmaker and in 1922 became the first woman licensed as a watchmaker in Holland. In May 1940, the German Blitzkrieg ran though the Netherlands and the other Low Countries. Within months, the "Nazification" of the Dutch people began and the quiet life of the ten Boom family was changed forever. During the war, her house became the refuge for Jews. A secret room, no larger than a small wardrobe closet, was built into Corrie's bedroom behind a false wall. The entire ten Boom family became active in the Dutch resistance, risking their lives harboring those hunted by the Gestapo. Corrie ten Boom became a leader in the "Beje" movement, overseeing a network of "safe houses" in the country. Through these activities, it was estimated that 800 Jews' lives were saved. Corrie lived for 91 years before she died on April 15, 1983.

Corrie impacted the world with the thought of sticking up for what you believe and what is right. She changed and saved hundreds on lives, she inspired many people in the world, including me.

“Do you know what hurts so very much? It's love. Love is the strongest force in the world, and when it is blocked that means pain. There are two things we can do when this happens. We can kill that love so that it stops hurting. But then of course part of us dies, too. Or we can ask God to open up another route for that love to travel.”

“Today I know that such memories are the key not to the past, but to the future. I know that the experiences of our lives, when we let God use them, become the mysterious and perfect preparation for the work he will give us to do. ”