Surveillance and Tracking Tech.

Is abuse of surveillance Tech breaking the 1st ammendment?

Backround Information

  • Surveillance is being used to spy on people everyday
  • People pay money for spying technology just to spy on people from their wife and children to their ex or an old friend from school
  • Spying tech is actually affordable
  • Police use tech that allows them to search phones
  • Tech such as a Dirt-box and a Stingray are being used efficiently by police

Benifits of Surveillance

  • Dirt-box and Stingray are names of portable cellphone towers mounted to police vehicle or attached to plans in the sky
  • They can sift though hundreds of cellphones a minute trying to find the victim
  • Stingray: Is mounted to a police vehicle and when vehicle drives by or if phone is in range; the stingray will connect to the phone acting as cell tower and go through recent calls, texts, photos, anything on your phone in a matter of seconds looking for the correct persons phone who has committed a crime
  • Dirt-box is same as Stingray but is in the air and once victims phone is found aircraft flies to better vantage point to keep on victim
  • These types of surveillance can be used to effectively hunt down criminals that are harder to get than just searching around and asking people
  • They give exact location of criminal as long as the phone or device is in range

Downside of Surveillance tech.

  • Some would say using this tech is breaking the privacy right of others
  • Even though the tech is used to catch criminals it can be used just to stalk and invades peoples privacy rights.
  • Things like my-spy (an easy accessible spying program)should not be on the market for use if so they should have strict limitations on who can buy them such as like FBI and undercover agents
  • If stingrays or dirt-boxes are ever stolen from the police they could be in the completely wrong hands. People could use to sift through over thousands of people cell phones a day. Seeing there location private information anything that is basically on your phone.
  • People today use things like Apple pay witch people who do use things like my-spy can access that and get credit cards and debit cards. They can see photos, text, calls, etc.
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This graph shows the crime rate from 1962 to2010. The CCTV was released to the market in 1980, but didn't really become popular until 1990. This graph is a perfect representation of how much the crime rate changed due to the CCTV.

Conclusion

In conclusion I think that some should surveillance technology should be used. Things like dirt-boxes and stingray should be limited to only FBI and CIA. They should be given to any county police. Things like security cameras though are completely okay, because they do not look at personal information. I think that things like my-spy should be taken off the market or people must have strict standards on why they need it.

Bibliography

"Americans' Cellphones Targeted in Secret U.S. Spy Program." WSJ. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2015.

Hope, Christopher. "Home Office to Unveil First CCTV Regulator to Take Control of Britain's Army of Cameras." The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group, n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2015.

"Lawmakers Press for Details on Police Phone Tracking Technology." Baltimoresun.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Dec. 2015.

"Nine Years Later Police Finally Admit Stingrays Spy On Innocent People." Sagacious News Network. N.p., 29 Oct. 2015. Web. 16 Dec. 2015.

"Police Secretly Track Cellphones." USA Today. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2015.

"Police-reported Crime Statistics in Canada, 2010." Police-reported Crime Statistics in Canada, 2010. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2015.

"Smartphones Are Used To Stalk, Control Domestic Abuse Victims." NPR. NPR, n.d. Web. 09 Dec. 2015.

Welsh, Brandon C., Farrington, David P; "Public Area CCTV and Crime Prevention: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis," Justice Quarterly, October, 2009, Volume 26, Issue 4, Pages 716-745. DOI: 10.1080/07418820802506206. - See More At: Http://journalistsresource.org/studies/government/criminal-justice/surveillance-cameras-and-crime#st...