VCR Lesson 5 Presentation

Maura Boerio

USE THE BEST WORD FROM LESSON 5 TO FILL IN THE BLANK:

In the classic Disney movie Mulan, the cunning main character enlists in her nation's army through the ___________ of pretending to be a man.
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THE VOCAB WORD:

legerdemain (n.)


1. sleight of hand; magic tricks


VCR example sentence: "Thomas Betson, a fifteenth-century monk skilled in legerdemain, could make a hollow egg appear to float by suspending it below his hand with a fine hair."


Why it Works: the underlined portion of the sentence clearly describes an action that defies the laws of physics, making it a "magical" action; suggesting that Betson can do this action supports the idea that he is skilled in legerdemain


2. any trickery or deception


VCR example sentence: "Emmeline Piggott, a Confederate spy who epitomized the elegant Southern belle, easily slipped military documents past Union sentries through the legerdemain of concealing the messages under her voluminous hoopskirt."


Why it Works: the underlined portions of the sentence imply that Piggott is participating in actions meant to be kept secret from others; therefore, she is being deceptive, or, in other words, she is conducting legerdemain

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Emmeline Piggott and her deceptive hoop skirt

ITS ROOTS:

Latin word "levis"

-means "light (in weight)"


Latin phrase "levis de manu"

-means "light of hand"


French phrase "leger de main"

-means "quick of hand"


In order for one to be deceptive, he must be figuratively light and quick "of hand." This means that he must carry out deception quickly ("quick of hand") and without leaving traces of evidence behind him ("light of hand"). To be good at magic tricks, one literally must be "light and quick of hand!"

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SYNONYMS:

-trickery

-manipulation

-chicanery (=deception)

ANTONYMS:

-honesty

-truthfulness

-openness

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In the Legerdemain computer game, the player must figure out how to escape from prison and then lead a life of deceit as a secret ex-convict.

CHOOSE THE SENTENCE IN WHICH THE WORD IN BOLD-FACED TYPE IS USED INCORRECTLY:

A: After he had successfully pulled a bouquet of flowers from his sleeve, I knew he was adept at legerdemain.

B: The auctioneer legerdemained his audience into thinking the old sewing machine was worth much more than it actually was.

C: The student was able to text in class through the legerdemain of concealing his phone with a book cover.

D: After seeing the magic show on television, I vowed that I would one day become good at legerdemain.

THE ANSWER:

B!

Legerdemain cannot be used as a verb. Typically, it is only used as a noun.