CENTRAL LOCAL SCHOOLS

"Who's Telling Your Story?" -- February 14, 2019

Giving Back to the Community: Fairview FCA Does That And Much More

From raising money for families in need, to visiting residents in an assisted living facility, to developing tomorrow's leaders, the Fairview Fellowship of Christian Athletes is a group with a vision. More commonly known as FCA, as many as 100 students are involved in a variety of activities, all of which are designed to provide services for the Fairview community.


FCA meets before and after school to plan events and to carry out its mission. Meetings, normally scheduled for the first and third Fridays of each month, are an opportunity for students to organize the next events, as well lead a lesson or listen to a guest speaker.


"The Fairview FCA does lots of work behind the scenes to make Fairview a great place to go to school," stated Jacob Panico, who is in his tenth year of voluntarily leading this group. "The work involves outreach activities to get lots of students involved, meetings to raise up leaders within the group, fundraising to help out community members , working with elementary students as positive role models, and learning and teaching the Gospel message."


As stated above, raising money for those in need has been a key objective of the Fairview FCA. In fact, this group of ambitious young people has raised over $1500 in the past two years, which has gone directly to families with immediate needs in our district. Current and future fund-raising efforts will continue. In fact, a large effort just came to completion with a sizable donation being made to two families in the district who suffered devastating loses.


"We raised money for families in our district whose homes were recently destroyed by fire," stated junior Adrianna Roth. "We collected money during lunch from students willing to donate and from parents at the Little Hoopsters events in January. Many people stepped forward and contributed. We are very grateful to these people who donated money to help those in need."


Large-group activities have become very popular. On Tuesday evening before Thanksgiving break, the students organized the 6th annual "Class Warfare", which pitted the four high school classes against one another in friendly games of competition. Eventually won by the seniors, games included dodge ball, Bible trivia, and scooter races. Over eighty students participated.


"We spent numerous hours planning this glorifying event," said sophomore Ryan Richards. "Students came and enjoyed themselves while bonding with one another and growing their leadership skills. This was a successful event."


In the month of January, over thirty high school FCA members volunteered each Saturday morning to help teach Fairview 2nd and 3rd graders the skills of basketball. Along with leading drills and coaching games, FCA students shared a positive message about being STRONG. The message behind STRONG is "I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, and I have remained faithful."


"I think all the kids really enjoyed playing basketball and spending time with their friends," stated sophomore Brook Mavis. "The high school students really enjoyed helping them out as well. We also used this time to teach the kids about being strong mentally and physically even at times where they're dealing with struggles."


Finally, a number of students recently visited Genesis Health Care in Bryan on a Sunday afternoon, interacting with residents and delivering Valentines.


"We were doing things in school that involved students, but we wanted to try to find a way to give back to the community," said senior Riley Collins. "We thought this would be a great way to get students involved in a very relaxed environment while bringing some happiness to some people who may not have many visitors."


In the top picture below, students listen to testimonies from Brook and Cassie Mavis during a large-group event. In the bottom picture below, several students pose with a resident of Genesis Health Care after she received her Valentine note.

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Eighth Graders Dive Into A Potential Career As Part of English/Language Arts Project

Through the experienced tutelage of English/language arts teacher Tracy Robinson and intervention specialists Brittany Yaichner and Stacy Nadler, the Fairview eighth graders recently took a deep dive into a chosen career as part of a Career Fair project.


Done annually, this unit drives home several of the required state content standards. Said Robinson, "This unit hits many standards, including research, writing informative text, conveying information, and determining relevance of content."


With much anticipation, this unit began back in December with a career survey and a career day. The bulk of the lesson then centered on a well-expressed explanation, subsequent in-depth research, and the publishing of a research paper, all which focused on a chosen career topic. The unit culminated with a full-day-visit to Four County Career Center, Northwest State Community College, and the APT Manufacturing Company in Hicksville.


"The field trip was amazing," said Robinson. "The students got to see a number of concrete, real-life manufacturing and engineering jobs. It opened our students' eyes to other opportunities available in today's workforce."


To bring completion to this endeavor, the students presented a Career Fair project on February 7, 2019, as the final portion of their career unit. The Career Fair project consisted of the students making a tri-fold presentation board that contained information they learned while researching their chosen career topic. After the tri-fold board was constructed, the students formally presented information about their careers to the sixth and seventh-grade students who visited their stations, all done in a structured environment and set up in the high school and middle school gyms. The sixth and seventh-grade students were then given questions to complete, and the answers were derived from both the information placed upon the eighth graders’ tri-folds and the information received from the eighth graders’ presentations.


"I felt the students were well prepared with their presentations, and I got many compliments from other teachers and other students on how seriously our students had taken this project," summarized Robinson.


This Career Unit allowed the eighth-grade students a chance to research their chosen career and makes it a more realistic experience. Reactions to their choices were mixed.


Stated Robinson: "By the end of this career unit, some students were more excited than ever about their chosen careers, while others were not certain they wanted to pursue that career, or in some cases were absolutely certain they did not want to enter that career.


"Whatever decision the students make about their chosen career, they have been given an opportunity to reflect on what pathway they may want to pursue and hopefully clarify their options for their futures."


Displaying their presentations in the pictures below include Rose Wanjema (top picture) and Dylan Winger (bottom picture).

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Agriculture Programs Offer Students Hands-On Experiences

For many Fairview High School students, working with farm animals is all they know, having grown up on farms or working near farms on a daily basis. However, several other students don't have that first-hand experience outside of the school day. Fortunately, the Animal Sciences classes, which are offered as part of the regular agriculture curriculum, make a big impact for students wishing to learn these skills but without the opportunities at home.


"We want all of the kids to have the ability to meet content standards by having hands-on activities even if they don't have animals at home," stated Miss Jessica Nagel, vocational agriculture teacher. "To make this happen, we raised twenty meat chickens in the shop. That project focuses on different feeds and how they affect the production of meat on the birds."


Along with chickens, students also raise rabbits from near-birth. The state content standards for rabbits are very similar to those with chickens, just with a different set of variables.


"There are also two rabbits in the classrooms that allow the freshmen to have animals that they care for daily," added Nagel. "We have the ability to breed them to learn about livestock reproduction. The offspring can then be used as SAE (supervised agricultural experiences) projects."


SAE projects are done outside of class time and offer students experiences of their own interest. "These are projects where students get to choose what they want to learn," continued Nagel. Senior Anna Lechleidner, for example, was able to land a job placement at Family Farm and Home in Defiance as part of the SAE program.


Along with learning a great deal about farms, "This job has taught me a lot about budgeting and time management," stated Lechleidner. "I also get to make money doing something I enjoy," she said with a smile.


Another part of the experience with chickens involves "rate of gain" which measures how many pounds of feed are needed to get a chicken up to the desired eight pounds.


"We use different amounts of feed and test the weight of the chickens based on these amounts," said Nagel. "This is a good project for students to see how much food it takes to raise an animal."


Below, monitoring said weight of gain is sophomore Macy Driskill.

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Fairview Seventh Grader Takes Cross-Curricular Lesson To A New Level

One might say that Andy Mosier knows a thing or two about coding, as evidenced by a recent cross-curricular project done at Fairview Middle School.


Mosier, a seventh grader, combined lessons from English/language arts, computer literacy, and the middle school coding club to design and code The Mirror of Erised from Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone.


"The mirror tells you what your greatest desire is," said Mosier. "Students push a button on a remote, and text will appear."


In addition to this unique design, Andy has created many other objects from this popular story, each coded electronically to perform something different. For example, he has designed a Golden Snitch with flapping wings, a wand that lights up, the Marauder's map which displays footprints that light up, and the Hogwart's castle which lights up to the music of the Harry Potter theme song.


"Coding is mostly something I enjoy. I first started learning about it at the MakerFacturing STEM Camp at Northwest State (Community College in Archbold), and now I'm more advanced at making projects."


His teachers are certainly impressed too. "I was overwhelmed," exclaimed his ELA teacher, Miss Addie Batt, when describing Mosier's work. "Andy goes above and beyond. Every time we go to the library, Andy checks out a new book about coding. I always ask him 'What can you teach me?'"


"Andy is a self-teacher," stated computer literacy teacher, Mr. Ray Breininger. "This is his passion, and he has done a lot of self-learning."


Mosier is also eager to help his classmates learn. "He and another student have created games for other students to play," continued Breininger. "In the coding club, he is a reference for the other students to build what we are building in class."


From everyone at Fairview Middle School, great work Andy... and we look forward to many more projects on down the line.


Pictured below is Mosier proudly displaying The Mirror of Erised.

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Fourth Grade Students Combine Art, Math, and the Holiday Season

Christmas trees in all shapes, colors, and sizes: That's what the fourth grade students at Fairview Elementary School recently completed through two different projects that combined art and math.


Led by Mrs. Brooke Snyder and Mrs. Amy Eitniear, and through the generous help from many parents and community members, students created "hanger Christmas Trees" using coat hangers, several varieties of tinsel, and various adhesives to hold the trees together.


"Fabulous Fun by all!" exclaimed Mrs. Eitniear. "Thank you to all the parents who supplied materials for their student & sent extra "stuff" to share. It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas!"


The second activity, done in conjunction with Mrs. Kathy Holtsberry from the Sherwood Library, involved working with shapes and the concept of tessellation. This word is defined as "to cover (a plane surface) by repeated use of a single shape, without gaps or overlapping." The students were challenged with measuring their shapes so that each of them was identical as to avoid said gaps or overlapping.


Mrs. Holtsberry read the story Christmas Tree Tangle by Margaret Mahy, then each student decorated identical Christmas tree cutouts.


Said Mrs. Eitniear: "Students put all of their individual trees together to make a larger tree. and we talked about tessellation using the example of the tree."


Shown in the top picture below are fourth grade students with their hanger trees, while the bottom picture portrays the art of creating a Christmas tree through the use of tessellation.


Congratulations to everyone involved in this creative, cross-curricular lesson.

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Seventh Grade Students Experience Cross-Curricular Lesson

In an effort to bring symmetry to a the classroom, the Fairview seventh grade teachers outlined and introduced a cross-curricular lesson to the Fairview seventh grade students on the topic of ancient Greece, which is one of the learning standards for seventh grade social studies. For those not familiar with the term "cross-curricular lesson," this is a learning strategy used where multiple content areas center around one theme with the goal of presenting more meaningful and "real" lessons to the students.


in social studies class, students were introduced the topic of ancient Greece and participated in discussions with other students about how this culture has influenced many parts of the world for generations. To make this topic more meaningful and easier to understand, students in English/language arts class read myths and legends, including the novel Percy Jackson.


To bring math into the equation (no pun intended), students learned and applied their knowledge of fractions, ratios, and proportions by appropriately changing ingredients for a recipe of a popular Greek dish. Since Athens is well known for hosting the original modern Olympic Games, students in science class coded ping-pong-balled-sized apparatuses called Ozobots to compete in one of the following events: figure skating, slalom skiing, or curling. They then created games of their own with rules and coded the Ozobot to complete the game successfully.


In an attempt to bring imagery to the unit, students traveled to the Toledo Museum of Art to support their studies in art class. And to bring physical education components into the lesson, students competed in a scaled-down version of the Olympic Games.


The culminating activities included a dress-up day with a fashion show and a lunch buffet, which included a variety of unique Greek recipes.


"I would like to thank the seventh grade team for bringing content to life and providing experiences that students will never forget," said Mrs. Suzanne Geis, MS principal.


Shown in the top picture below is our seventh grade team of teachers responsible for crafting this creative unit: (left to right) Sarah Friess, Trisha Schlachter, Beth Bechtol, Nikki Grine, Brittany Yaichner, and Addie Batt. In the middle picture below, Cody Huffman is seen portraying a Greek god as part of the dress-up fashion show, while in the bottom picture below, students take the starting line to participate in one of the many Olympic events.

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Foreign Language Department Gears Up For Overseas Trip

Note: This is part three of a three-part series highlighting the Foreign Language Department


An overseas trip, hurricane relief, a reading challenge, and more highlight the third part of the three-part series showcasing the continued activities of the Fairview Foreign Language Department.


Hurricane Relief


Following the devastating hurricane in Puerto Rico, several students stepped up and led in-class lessons centering on problem-solving and activism. Through their efforts, students were able to raise over $1,000 in aid, which was sent during the 2017-2018 school year. This money was used in a variety of ways including to help build a new preschool.


Ambassador Leadership Summits


To help promote achievement and leadership, the department has recognized twenty-five high-achieving foreign language students this school year with nominations for the Leadership Summit for Ambassador Leadership Summits, held at Yale University, Johns Hopkins University, UCLA, and Harvard Law School.


Says Mrs. Jacqueline Davis, Spanish teacher and department advisor: "The goal of this program is to unlock leadership potential and build confidence, expand global awareness and learn how they (nominated students) can make a difference in their community, and gain a competitive edge for college admissions."


Reading Challenge


To build skills in reading and word recognition, four students recently finished at least eight books each (written in Spanish). Following the completion of the books, the group got together over snacks and Scrabble to discuss various themes.


Library Collaboration


With the help of Mrs. Sally Miller, Fairview MS/HS librarian, and Mrs. Kathy Holtsberry, Sherwood Public Librarian, our local libraries have made a conscientious effort to expand their offerings to students by providing additional books and materials written in foreign languages.


American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL)


With the overall goal of matching individual students with their foreign language needs and goals, students recently took part in a student survey from ACTFL. As part of the process, students received College Scholarship Match Reports.


Paris 2020


Finally, the biggest news of all may be a trip to Paris scheduled for 2020, with plans and fundraising activities currently in motion to help supplement the costs of the trip. A Yankee Candle Sale is set to open in January 2019 (with the school receiving 40% of the sales), while a Royal Tea fundraising event was held in October with several people in attendance. The Royal Tea featured an array of flavors for sampling, a guest speaker who spoke of a recent trip to England, and Miss Kari Rosani on the bagpipes.


"Thank you to the village of Sherwood and Sherri Ramey for allowing us to use the Crystal Fountain Auditorium for our fundraiser," stated Mrs. Davis.


For enrollment information about this exciting opportunity, visit www.eftours.com/2096726ex.


For anyone wishing for more detailed information about the trip to Paris or for answers to any general questions about the Fairivew Foreign Language Deparrtment, interested persons should contact Mrs. Davis at the school. And remember to follow the department on Twitter @FairviewFLDept to stay current on in-class activities, extensions, college foreign language programs, study abroad programs, international current events, and opportunities for future foreign language careers and activism.


Shown below is senior Trevor McMahon offering information about all the Foreign Language Department has to offer students at Fairview High School.

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Fairview Teachers Team Up With Central Shares

Central Shares, a charitable organization in the Central Local School District, seeks to provide needed essentials to members of the community. To help with this effort, the Teachers Association of Central Local Schools (TACLS) has teamed up with Central Shares by coordinating a food drive.


The event kicked off at the last home football game on October 26. Several teachers braved the unfavorable weather that evening by tailgating and "stuffing the trailer" outside the ticket area.


"This was a great example of how our teachers can come together and be unified in helping our community," says Jill Speiser, family & consumer science teacher.


The food drive will continue through the holidays, so community members interested in contributing to this cause may do so by dropping off items in the elementary school atrium.


Shown in the picture below are several teachers who were present at the football game on October 26.

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Sixth Graders Introduced to the STEAM Experience

STEAM is coming from all directions in the Maker Space room at Fairview Middle School as Mrs. Sarah Schaper introduces several new concepts to this year's sixth grade students. STEAM, an acronym for science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics, is in full swing this year.


"In my first year teaching STEAM, I have tried to involve outside help from the community in teaching the students new things, especially involving technology," says Schaper. "I contacted Chris Malanga from NWOCA, and he came for four days to present to the kids about LEGO Mindstorm."


Evidence strongly suggests that hands-on lessons are most effective, especially in the world of science, and LEGO is a great tool to motivate students.


"They enjoyed building the LEGO robot and creating the programs to make their robot move," continues Schaper. "I am hoping to encourage the students to investigate their interests in various projects that involve engineering and computer programming."


Getting both boys and girls excited about STEAM is critical, as these areas of study have been dominated for years by men. But clearly, both boys and girls alike were equally excited to participate in the LEGO project.


"Many were very excited about tackling this project!" exclaimed Schaper with excitement.


Shown in the picture below facilitating a class of sixth graders hard at work is Mr. Malanga from Northwest Ohio Computer Association (NWOCA).

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Fairview Foreign Language Department Continues Making Program Advancements

Note: This is part two of a three-part series highlighting the Foreign Language Department


From designing a website, to offering advanced curricular options, to welcoming a student teacher to the building, the Fairview High School Foreign Language Department continues making tremendous advancements in just a short time period of time.


“We are so thankful for administrative and community support as we have been working hard to revive and build our foreign language department," indicates Spanish teacher Mrs. Jacqueline Davis. "By making long-term improvements, we show our students how important their foreign language education can be. That directly effects their immediate futures, college experiences, and career options.”


The new FL Dept. website features a variety of Spanish class resources, foreign language resources, extension activities, community shout out's, and event photos. Visitors to the website (which can be accessed on the Central Local web-site or found on Twitter @FairviewFLDept), will find a list of reasons for studying a second language, a list of positive effects of a full foreign language education, and other statistics and advantages of being able to speak more than one language.


"If we want long-term foreign language education success, we need information to be accessible to students and families," continues Mrs. Davis. "Our website is a way to help connect students to their current language interests, and long-term language goals. We want to thank our tech director, Mr. Adam Singer, for his continual help updating our site and announcements."


Having the necessary curricular tools is a vital part of learning a new language. Fortunately, students have been introduced to new textbooks that align with AP Prep, and a recent Central Local Mini-Grant has paved the way for a new set of authentic text novels. Just this October, Davis applied for an additional grant through the Ohio Foreign Language Association to continue building classroom resources, while students are applying the school-wide E+R=O initiative in Spanish.


"Community collaboration has been vital as we continue updating our curricular materials to national standards, while still incorporating our community’s values. We thank our Board of Education for the purchase of our new text books; The Fairview Mini-Grant Committee for our new Spanish II authentic novels; and the Fairview High School Library and Sherwood Community Library for their collaboration and new multi-cultural young adult literature. These advancements are designed to fuel literacy, multiculturalism, bilingualism, and most importantly, student engagement. The more we build an environment that embraces foreign language, the more likely our students are to become bilingual in their lives and careers."


As a final piece of excitement, Mrs. Davis is pleased to note that she will have the opportunity to mentor a student teacher for the first time this year.


“We are so excited to have Mr. Andrew Dennis with us this year from Bowling Green State University. He responds very well to the kids and has a heart for linguistics. We are really looking forward to his student teaching in the spring.”


Congratulations to Mrs. Davis and the foreign language department for its continued advancements.


Shown in the picture below are Spanish I students enjoying authentic foods they prepared and presented for Mexican celebration Day of the Dead.

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FCCLA Continues to Give Back to the Community

The Fairview FCCLA (Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America), under the direction of Mrs. Jill Speiser, continues to make a positive difference in many facets of the community by providing an array of services.


"We are a group that loves to get together and do things!" exclaims Speiser with a big smile on her face. "It could be for a community service project, for leadership in the chapter, or for a competitive project."


From cleaning up the roads to bringing joy to the elderly, students are willing to step up to make a difference.


"We started off the year with several different activities such as participating in different county fair activities and picking up trash for the Adopt a Roadway program. We've also decorated pumpkins and delivered them to the nursing home."


The FCCLA students are constantly seeking additional training and learning new ways to help others.


Says Speiser, "We went to Pioneer Career Center (Shelby, OH) for a Chapter Officer Training. From there we went to Camp Palmer for our Fall District Rally." Speiser notes that these events are designed for students to work with other students to develop leadership and service skills, all while making friends from other school districts.


Several future events are also in the planning stages, according to Speiser.


"This year, Fairview has three District Officers that get to plan and run the District Rallies. In the near future we plan to visit the Fort Defiance Humane Society, go caroling at nursing homes, have a Thanksgiving Potluck, and start working on our competitive projects that get judged in early March."


For more information about this motivated group of young people, contact Mrs. Speiser at Fairview HS.


Shown in the picture below are several members of this year's club taking a short break from picking up trash along Coy Road.

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Fairview Foreign Language Department -- Organized, Energized, and Active

Note: This is part one of a three-part series highlighting the Foreign Language Department.


The Fairview Foreign Language Club, under the direction of Mrs. Jacqueline Davis, is setting a very high bar for activity. Designed to bring a greater understanding of cultures from other parts of the world, the department aims to immerse its members in a variety of activities.


“Our activities are an opportunity for students to explore various aspects of cultures they may not see or experience in Northwest Ohio," states Davis. "While the activities are entertaining, the goal is to educate and empower students to be global-minded. We want to be well-informed, to appreciate diversity, and to make the world a better place.”


Organized with officers, members elected the following students for the 2018-2019 school year: Alena Gallindo, president; Adrianna Roth, vice president; Natalie Marshall, secretary, Alayna Willitzer, treasurer, and Jalee Elson, Trevor McMahon, & Josiah Adkins, student ambassadors. Davis believes these young people are an integral part of the club and states, "Our officers for 2018-2019 have shown tremendous leadership in the last year. Because this is only our second year in operation, their vision for student-led activities has defined our diverse expectation for learning. Each of them represents and demonstrates the global-minded values we hope to instill throughout the year."


Monthly meetings are held at least one time per month. Each meeting is designed to highlight one particular country’s language, customs, and food. Recently, the club heard from current students Kaleigh and Alexis Hart about their travels to Europe.


Continues Davis, "In the last month, students have been excited to hear Kaleigh and Alexis share about their recent trip to ten European countries."


In addition, "We learned the Japanese alphabet and completed our first fundraiser. Next month, we are looking forward to learning about the country of Greece, visiting a Greek restaurant, and talking to a nurse who recently returned from working there."


The club got off to a roaring start a year ago with several educational excursions, including trips to Bowling Green for Middle Eastern and Irish food; to Bowling Green State University for a Caribbean concert; to The Valentine Theater in Toledo for the Italian Opera “Rigoletto”; and to Valparaiso University to explore their multicultural and foreign language programs and authentic Spanish food. Additionally, several former and current students have come to meetings to speak to the students, including Austin Rucker, who spoke about his life and experiences Germany; Chris Yagel, who spoke about his life in Japan, and the Hart sisters (noted above), who discussed their summer trip to Europe.


Also, in a collaborative effort between student ambassador Jalee Elson and cafeteria director Chris Bok, students were afforded the opportunity to try different foods from around the world during Foreign Language Learning Week held in March of 2018. "This school-wide event was the first of its kind, and also offered a trivia competition, school-wide décor, themed dress-up days, and a fundraiser," says Davis.


Not to be outdone, this year's planned events include visits to Carmen the Opera, the International Festival at Valparaiso University, Oktoberfest with BGSU’s German club, a sushi party, international Christmas caroling, and an International Dinner hosted by the Sherwood Pizza & Subs.


"So many of our activities are student-led and involve community collaboration; the kids tell me what they are interested in exploring, and we make that happen. We try to find as many local events and activities where culture, diversity, and language are highlighted. I love watching students follow their curiosity to try new experiences for the first time; that’s a life skill."


Finally, another group of twenty students interested in Japanese language, food, culture and travel, affectionately known as the Japanese Crew, have been meeting monthly as a Foreign Language Club extension.


"We were surprised by how many students have been interested in learning about Japanese language, food, and experiences. We have been so blessed to have new student Chris Yagel here to spark our interest, teach us the alphabet, and share his culture with us. In addition, Mrs. Miller in the library has introduced us to a vast wealth of Japanese resources on Japanese cooking, history, culture, and customs. We are hoping to have our first sushi-making party before Christmas."


You can follow the Foreign Language Club and the Foreign Language Department on Twitter @FairviewFLDept.


In the picture below, Mrs. Davis (second row, center) is flanked by this year's members of the Fairview HS Foreign Language Club.

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Motion Created Through Many Forms of Energy

What makes an object move? Why does it move as far as it does? What causes it to slow down and/or change directions? These questions and more are being answered in Mrs. Tonya Kelly's classroom as her students are learning all about motion and the forces needed to make objects move.


As part of this lesson, students created balloon-powered "race cars" with the goal of making them travel distances as a result of air being extracted from a balloon.


"They (the students) researched Newton's Third Law of Motion," said Kelly. "They adjusted the mass and weight and came up with just the right amount of force."


Most people have probably learned Newton's Laws at some point in their lives, but as a quick refresher, Newton's Third Law is best known in the terms of "For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction." When air leaves the balloon, this force causes the car to move.


Like many experiments, the results varied. However, students were excited to see that their continued trials and tribulations led the cars to move the desired distance.


In fact, "In one trial run, the car traveled ten feet," stated Kelly.


Shown in the top picture are Allison Rhodes, Nolan Polito, Lester Smith, and Michael Mansel-Pleydell showing off their model and providing details to the class. In the bottom picture, Rhodes is prepared to release the air to see Newton's Third Law in action.

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Fairview Middle School Earns Momentum Award for Second Consecutive Year

Student growth and academic achievement continue to be at the forefront in the halls of Fairview Middle School, as for second consecutive year, FMS has earned the Momentum Award from the Ohio Department of Education. Based on academic progress, schools that show continued growth in the areas of "Achievement," "Progress," and "Gap Closing" are the recipients of this prestigious designation.


This award is the result of many factors, most notably the buy-in of the staff members to find creative means to reach a variety of learning styles.


"The teachers are continuously working to find ways to meet individual student needs so all students are successful," says Mrs. Suzanne Geis, building principal. "They are relentless. These teachers are taking ownership of student success."


Geis believes her staff has adapted to the changes coming in the world of education.


"Our teachers have students' complete learning style surveys and interest surveys so lessons can be designed to align with those interests and needs, which leads to deeper engagements and learning."


On behalf of Central Local Board of Education, we send many congratulations to all Fairview staff members, students, and parents who made this award possible.


Shown accepting the award at the recent Northwest Ohio School Boards Association fall banquet are (second from left) Mrs. Beth Bechtol, Mrs. Suzanne Geis, Ms. Addie Batt, and Mrs. Beverly Singer. They are flanked by OSBA president Randy Smith (far left) and NWOSBA president Penny Kill (far right).

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Miss Friess Uses Art to Open Doors with Students

Attention all artists: The east wing hallway of Fairview Middle School is currently an art lover's paradise as Miss Sarah Friess' sixth grade art class students have adorned the walls with non other than self portraits in the form of Lego characters.


"The premise of this particular project is to get to know my new 6th grade students through their self portraits as Lego characters," says Friess. "They are asked to add at least five things about themselves in their drawing. Those five things should help their friends and classmates recognize them."


Drawing oneself is never easy, especially for young people, but this lesson helps to alleviate some of the hurdles that students face when asked to draw a picture of themselves.


Says Friess, "If you ask most students to draw themselves, they have a tendency to shut down because 'That’s too hard!' or 'I don’t know how to draw a face!' When you ask kids to draw something like a Lego person to look like them, they can process that differently and are far less intimidated by the idea.


"I start each quarter with a new batch of 6th graders and love doing this project!"


To help illustrate the idea, Friess created a Lego character of herself (second picture below) and states "the kids really look forward to making their own."


Over the years, Friess has attempted to create a culture where kids look forward to going to art class.


"It’s a wonderful feeling as a teacher… knowing the kids are excited to get to your class and start making art. The best part to my job is creating an environment of trust and respect where kids feel free to do their best without judgment or ridicule."


Among the many fine pieces of artwork currently displayed is the Lego self portrait created by Natalie Timbrook (seen in the picture below). Great job to Natalie and the sixth grade art class students.

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Mrs. Woodring Introduces Ecosystems

When you walk through Mrs. Amy Woodring's classroom door, one of the first sights you are sure to notice are the beautiful colors on the other side of the room. Lots of green, orange, white, and pink to name a few. No, her students aren't studying the colors of the rainbow, but rather they are being introduced to the world of ecosystems.


As part of this hands-on lesson, students designed their own ecosystems with use of a variety of products, most notably two-liter bottles, stones, dirt, plants, water, and live creatures such as snails and fish.


"The Biology classes have been learning about ecosystems and the biotic and abiotic factors in them," says Woodring. " As part of this unit, I had the students research different types of ecosystems that could be constructed out of a 2-liter bottle. They could choose an aquatic or terrestrial system."


Students were put in groups with each student having an equal part in the projects. Using the bottle as the living environment, most groups chose to cut out part of the top and begin adding contents. As seen in the pictures below, many went with water (aquatic), while others chose dirt (terrestrial).


"They (the students) had to make a list of materials they needed and a procedure to follow to construct the ecosystem. Students brought in most of the items used during construction."


The overall goal of this lesson was to teach students that for life to survive, the right environment must exist, including adequate oxygen and food. In the absence of one or the other, the organisms were not going to make it long.


"Some of the fish didn't make it through the weekend, but the snails all appear to be doing fine," noted Woodring earlier this week. "The water has to be just right for the fish to survive, and the students are learning how to make that happen."


Shown in the pictures are several examples of the finished products.

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Central Local Celebrates Years of Service to the District

To help celebrate years of service to Central Local Schools, staff members posed for group pictures at this year's opening day staff meeting.


Staff members with 30-plus years include (left to right) Mary Ann Steffel, Susan Kozumplik, Diane Stover, Dave Miller, Lisa Vance, and Tara Czartoski.

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Staff members with 26-29 years of service to the district include (left to right) Staci Renollet, Steve Rohrs, and Lisa Nusbaum.
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Staff members with 21-25 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Beth Bechtol, Stacy Nadler, Denae Roose, Denise Pannell, Sandy Heighland, Kari Rosania, and Jenny Johnson; and in the back row (left to right) Diane Meyer, Lauren Beck, Kelly Dempsey, Anne Frank, Cheryl Harding, Addie Batt, and Kevin Sims.
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Staff members with 16-20 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Kim Beek, Joni Culler, Molly Hauer, Amy Eitniear, Nikki Grine, Tracy Robinson, Lori Polter, and Beverly Singer; and in the back row (left to right) Jake Panico, Vicky Moore (with Ralph), Adam Brickner, Curt Foust, Ray Breininger, Brooke Snyder, Jess Hotmire, Katrina Tonneas, and Andy Singer.
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Staff members with 11-15 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Amanda Troyer, Jill Speiser, Vickie Crites, Lisa Ford, Amy Woodring, and Kelly Panico; and in the back row (left to right) Trisha Schlachter, Terri Cooper, Sheryl Short, and Sarah Friess.
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Staff members with 6-10 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Nancy Scantlen, Chelsey Hartz, Tonya Kelly, Lauren Hurtig, Annie Zipfel, Courtney Cobb, Emily Willitzer, Megan Gearhart, Julee Bayliss, and Brittany Yaichner; and in the back row (left to right) Jessie Timbrook, Adam Singer, Doug Rakes, Nic Alvarez, Taryn Monroe, Jessie Sliwinski, Jason Wermer, Eric Drummelsmith, and Kurt Nusbaum.
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Staff members with 1-5 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Amy Dunlap and Nicole Carone; in the middle row (left to right) Sherrie Brown, Jessica Nagel, Kim Dockery, Janie Laukhauf, Sally Miller, Ginny Pettenger, Lindsay Imm, Jacqueline Davis, Suzanne Geis, and Maggie Schneider; and in the back row (left to right) Josh Neilson, Brady Ruffer, Kerry Samples, Meagan Taylor, Tim Breyman, Laura Renollet, Alison Ciolek, Joe Kime, Scott Hall, Bodi Kaufman, and Jason Pelz.
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Staff members new to the district this year include (front row - left to right) Kari Myers, Kristi Schooley, Jami Speiser, Cara Drummelsmith, Shanna Collins, and Joanna Harmon; and in the back row (left to right) Kelly Hug, Laura Brady, Andrew McMaster, Derek Smalley, Nick Karayianopoulos, and John Echelbarger.
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The "Middle School Mission" At Work

Fairview Middle School faculty and staff understand that the middle school years can be a tough time of transition and self-doubt. The staff also understands the high academic demands coming from the state of Ohio and the tremendous importance of building a strong educational foundation. Fortunately, those who work daily with children this age also understand the necessity for meeting the needs of the whole child. As a result, Mrs. Geis has built time into this year's weekly schedule for special group activities and R Factor disciplines, all which lead to the overarching "Middle School Mission."


"Life happens," says Principal Geis. "A variety of events will take place throughout our day. We cannot control the events, but we can control how we respond to each event in an effort to creating a positive outcome."


The outcome Geis refers to is the R Factor. "Learning how to manage our R can be the difference between a successful outcome and a frustrating, angry or negative consequence."


Fairview Middle School also stresses the "above the line" responses and behaviors. Students are learning how to make choices with intention, while learning that actions and words are choices that lead to outcomes.


To enhance this growing program, students leaders have been chosen and/or have volunteered to lead monthly focus groups with the guidance of a teachers.


"Each group of student leaders plans activities for the student body promoting and modeling the particular focused R Factor discipliine," continued Geis. "The goal is to provide opportunities for students to put the disciplines into practice."


All students have also been divided into different teams with mixed grade levels to participate in activities promoting cooperation and recognition of each other's strengths. The main goal of the program is to provide opportunities for students to make positive connections with students in other grade levels and with the adults in the building in an effort to create a more inclusive and supportive school environment where all students can flourish.


In addition to R Factor push, MS teachers are offering special club-type activities every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon for students in each grade level. Examples of the clubs, which will change each quarter, include the following: drama, photography, current events, walking, chess, arts & crafts, coloring, math, science, Cricut crafts, helping others, and book club.


"The R Factor disciplines and student activities all support our middle school mission which is to develop and foster social awareness in an effort to continuously promote a positive learning culture conducive to maximizing each student's individual potential in becoming the best version of themselves.," summarizes Geis.


For more information about this ground-breaking program, interested individuals should contact the middle school office.


Seen in the top picture below is Miss Addie Batt supervising the chess club. Underneath, Mr. Nick Karayianopoulos demonstrates a scene for the drama club.

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Computer Literacy Class -- How Pixels Affect Our Lives

Students in Mr. Ray Breininger's computer literacy class are doing their best to keep up with the fast-paced changes in today's ever-advancing world of technology. Among many projects planned for this year, students are currently experiencing the complex world of coding. What is coding, you might ask?


"Coding is another term for computer programming," says Breininger. "The eighth grade computer literacy students are participating in a project-based, stem coding class with a circuitry prototyping component."


Students recently completed a nine pixel animation machine. Despite students' love for technology, many did not know until this lesson how pixels (short for picture elements) affected their everyday lives.


"This lesson focused on the fact that students use monitors everyday on their phones, computers, tablets, and TV's," continued Breininger. "Students learned that the displays on most present-day monitors are composed of millions of pixels, which are tiny points that the computer can light up in different colors."


Although most people take for granted just how incredible today's technology is, students are always eager to understand why their devices are capable of doing what they do.


Students learned that "all these pixels together make up the text, images , and videos" they read and see on their screens everyday.


After building a simple monitor using LED's, students learned how to use custom functions using the Arduino platform to code a simple message like "help."


A variety of supplies, both simple and complex, are needed to complete the monitors. Students used practical, everyday materials like hot glue and cardboard to build their enclosure constructions: yet for the electronic part of their projects, they used more advanced products found in a Sparkfun Inventor kit. The main component of the Sparkfun Inventor kit is the Arduino Red board micro-controller.


Learning these skills in the middle school are prerequisites for being successful in certain high school classes. Says Breininger: "The use of the Arduino micro-controller prepares students for the necessary coding background required by the high school engineering course."


We wish our students ongoing success as our teachers continue challenging them with relevant, modern lessons each day.


Seen in the top picture below is Tatum Sheets demonstrating his working nine pixel animation machine. In the bottom picture, Carrie Zeedyk uses a template to cut out her enclosure construction for the nine pixel animation machine.

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Emotional Support Dog Helps In Many Ways

Ralph, a five-year-old tri-colored beagle, is an Emotional Support Dog who comes to Fairview Elementary School each Friday with his owner, Mrs. Vicky Moore. Mrs. Moore is the Title I teacher for kindergarten and grade 3. She also provides needed support for students in grades 4 and 5.


Says Mrs. Moore: "The children love Ralph, and Ralph loves the children. Fridays are testing and progress days, and Ralph is able to provide a calming environment for students during these assessments. In addition, Ralph gives us all comfort and support."


Ralph (with some assistance from Mrs. Moore) reads to classrooms full of children at special times during the year. At each of these events, he shares ten messages and asks the students to make a promise to work on these messages: BE...

R - responsible and respectful

A - attentive and amicable

L - likable and a good listener

P - patient and proud

H - honest and helpful


Here are a few statements from teachers at Fairview Elementary School:


"Ralph is patient, loving, huggable, well-behaved, and has the best ears ever!"

"You put a smile on our faces and make us look forward to Fridays."

"You brighten my day, and you're so good with the kids at FVE."

"You bring happiness to all who see you."


Many thanks go out to Mrs. Moore and Ralph for making a positive difference for the students at Fairview Elementary School.


Shown in the photo below is Ralph welcoming a new student to the our district.

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Fairview Freshman Authors Novel

Everyone wants his or her high school years to be memorable, and for Andrea Macsay, she has gotten off to a great start. At just fourteen years old, Andrea has published her first book, Moonglade, which she began writing and editing one year ago.


"Writing is just really revolutionary, and the variety of words can change the hardest of hearts," says Andrea. "The beauty of words can paint a whole new picture of something so simple."


Moonglade is an adventure featuring characters Bella and Jack who just want a normal get-away vacation with the goal of putting their stress behind them. Trouble, however, soon begins when their plane experiences mechanical issues and falls from the sky. As they plummet to Earth, they wish only to survive.


Meanwhile, back in Jack and Bella's home state, an unloved little boy named Jeremiah seeks some worth in this world. Under the power of his foster parents, who hate anything and everything, including Jeremiah, they throw him outside to live among pigs and force him to adapt to an unhealthy sleeping schedule. One day after the news exploded of the plane crash, Jeremiah has the brilliant idea to join the search party. And thus the story begins.


"The movie Castaway really inspired me to create this story based on the many ways an author can make a story come to life. There are many troubles that the characters go through, and I feel that them pushing through them is very encouraging to many people."


The school library currently has two signed copies of Andrea's book, so to learn how this exciting plot twists and turns, be sure to borrow a copy soon.


From everyone at Fairview High School, we offer Andrea Macsay (shown below holding her book) many congratulations and wish her much success as she continues her writing in the future.

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Real-Life Science Experiment with Mrs. Schlachter

As a veteran science teacher, Mrs. Trisha Schlachter knows a thing or two about science experiments. But she experienced a "first" on opening day this school year.


While presenting new information to her ambitious students, a cracked tooth suddenly fell out of her mouth. Seizing the opportunity to make the event a teachable moment, she showed the students how to quickly and correctly bag up the tooth so that it would remain in good order for the balance of day. With the safety of her tooth in check and her students having learned a valuable lesson, she went about the rest of the day finishing her classes.


The next day she arrived with a new tooth, but this group of seventh graders may always remember their first day of school.


Thanks, Mrs. Schlachter, for presenting a real-life experiment on opening day.


Seen in the picture below with Mrs. Schlachter are students Aubryn Viers and Nevada Vogelsong examining the damaged tooth.

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Welcome Back Students

Opening day at school is always a special time for students, especially for youngsters returning to the elementary school.


In the picture below, Mrs. Brown receives a hug from one of her students, while Ms. Myers, our new school counselor, helps to welcome a group of young people back from summer vacation.


Excitement runs high at all three Fairview buildings as we anticipate another great school year.

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Orientation for New Students at Fairview High School

In what has become an annual tradition, Fairview High School began the 2018-19 school year with its "Freshman/New Student Orientation Day." Started in 2016, the primary objective for this day is for the Fairview HS faculty and staff to help incoming freshmen and other students new to the district become acclimated to a new building, to a new schedule of classes, and to a new group of teachers.


The morning hours were spent with students spending time in each class on their schedule in order to learn their way around the building and to be introduced to each teacher. Following the morning session, several teachers prepared and served lunch to all students, which included the Yummy Yunker French Fries. Following lunch, students gathered in groups to spend the afternoon participating in team building competitions.


"It was great to welcome new faces to the high school. Teachers worked very hard to introduce the students to the high school and make them feel comfortable," said Mr. Breyman, HS principal.


"Special thanks to our staff that worked tirelessly in planning over the summer. The day was fun for all."


Shown in the top picture below are Mr. Yunker, Mr. Rakes, and Mr. Kauffman preparing the fries. Shown in bottom picture is Mr. Breyman interacting with a group of students during lunch.


From everyone at Fairview HS, we'd like to send out a big Apache welcome to our freshman and all new students.

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One of area's nicest baseball facilities a result of years of fund-raising

Area baseball players, coaches, and fans know these facts to be true about Fairview High School baseball: rich tradition, multiple championships, and outstanding facilities. Many great players, coaches, and families have aided in these accolades, but among the most dedicated of them all is current head baseball coach Andy Singer, who has been instrumental in making the baseball field among the nicest in this part of Ohio.


"The facility upgrades are done so that our players can have a facility that they can be proud of and that they feel like they are appreciated for their efforts," said Singer. "The coaching staff, parents, players, and community members have all been part of all the facility upgrades over the past sixteen years."


In the past decade and a half , the facility has undergone extensive improvements, all done through the efforts of an on-going, private fund-raising campaign spearheaded by Singer, along with many tireless volunteers. He is quick to give credit to everyone who has helped.


"The best thing about this is that it can't be one person that makes this happen. Our district is blessed to have dedicated coaches, dedicated parents, dedicated players, and a wonderful community that will step up when we can provide our players with something they can be proud of."


The largest overhaul occured in 2007 with the addition of new dugouts, a concession stand, a press box, a brick backstop, backstop netting, a concrete seating area, a re-crowned and re-seeded infield, an irrigation system, and wooden benches in both dugouts. Since then, the backstop netting was replaced (2010), a state-of-the-art scoreboard was erected (2012), for-ever-green ivy was installed on the outfield fence (2013), infield turf was laid (2017), and a much-needed storage building was constructed (2018)... all done with money raised privately.


Says Singer, "Those funds come from many man hours of work running the 4th, 5th and 6th grade girls basketball tournament; an Acme round robin tournament; a Jr. Acme round robin tournament; the Jr. Acme regional tournament; 127 garage sale concessions; concessions at all games played on the field; the fall tailgate supper and sausage sale; and then with the help of the Ney Area JC's and our annual Designer Purse Reverse.


"Our most recent addition was the storage building that replaced the two resin buildings that were previously in the same spot. Those buildings were 12 x 12 and due to weathering were falling apart and not adequately keeping our equipment/supplies dry and clean. This new storage building will allow for plenty of storage for our future needs both equipment/supplies/concessions."


According to Singer, several area teams reach out to Fairview to play games here.


"With all of the renovations that have taken place, we find that many coaches from other schools enjoy coming to Fairview to allow their athletes the chance to play at a facility like ours."


Singer and his staff focus on fund-raisers that unite the community and teach his players valuable life lessons: "All of our fundraisers are events that bring the community together to support our student-athletes and enjoy fellowship time together. When our players work at these events, they are also learning the valuable lesson of working hard and serving the public in a polite and respectful manner."


Working this year's concession stand at the annual 127 Yard Sales include (below, left to right) Terri Cooper, Andy Singer, Anthony Singer, Dave Cooper, Tony Singer, and Beverly Singer.

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Kristi Schooley set to begin new career as a teacher; Laura Brady joins central office staff

As the 2018-2019 school year quickly approaches, more changes are happening with the central office staff. Not only does our school district have a new superintendent, but we will soon have a new administrative assistant to the superintendent as well.


After four years of serving in this capacity, Ms. Kristi Schooley is set to trade in her daily clerical duties and begin a new chapter of her life as she becomes the Fairview High School business teacher in August.


"I've always wanted to be a teacher, but coming out of high school I was undecided about a career path," stated Schooley. "I had taken accounting and other business classes in high school and ended up deciding to pursue an accounting career. After getting an accounting degree, I ended up being a stay-at-home mom for several years.


"When I decided to re-enter the workforce, I first worked as a substitute teacher, which led to working in the school system. Eventually, the position I'm leaving became available, and I was selected for this job.


"I have really enjoyed this job, but I've missed the interaction with students. Then when the opportunity came to apply for the business teaching position, I believed the timing was right for me. I applied for the teaching job and was blessed to be chosen."


Schooley, a mother of three Fairview students, admits there will be facets of her old job that she will miss. "I will miss the daily contact with my fellow office workers and the frequent interaction I have with the community."


Yet the excitement of working with students is something she is very much looking forward to as the new school year approaches. "I have been preparing for opening day with the students for several weeks now and can't wait to introduce my first lesson to my students."


Although new superintendent, Mr. Steve Arnold, has worked with Schooley for just a short while, she has made a great impression. "Kristi has taught me so much about the Central Local School District since I arrived in early June. Her knowledge and experience will be missed, although I wish her much success as she ventures into a new chapter of her life," stated Arnold.


Replacing Ms. Schooley in the central office will be Mrs. Laura Brady. A Fairview alumnae and mother of four former/current Fairview students, Brady comes to Central Local Schools having most recently worked for Williams County Job and Family Services in a similar role.


"In my previous job with Williams County, I served as the HR Officer for JFS. Among my many duties, I was actively involved in the hiring process, the orientation of new employees, payroll and benefits, and the behind-the-scenes business operations," said Brady.


Brady is currently spending a few days working side-by-side with Schooley learning as much as she can before taking over on her own.


"I definitely have an appreciation for everything that Kristi does in this office. In just a few days, we have covered a lot of different duties and responsibilities, and hopefully everyone will be patient as I try to learn this job."


Brady is not hiding her excitement as the days crawl closer to the start of this coming school year.


"I'm looking forward to learning the business end of a school system and getting to know the employees and students at Fairview. I'm just so excited to get started."


Says Arnold: "Laura brings a great deal of experience with her. I look for the transition to be very smooth."


We wish both Ms. Schooley (left in picture below)) and Mrs. Brady well in their new positions.

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"Who's Telling Your Story?" makes its debut with a feature on the Central Local Maintenance Crew

Welcome to the new "Who's Telling Your Story?" website link, where employees of the Central Local School District will have the opportunity to promote the many awesome events happening on a daily basis in their classrooms, departments, offices, etc.



As we start to role through the month of July, our maintenance staff is busily preparing the buildings for the 2018-2019 school year. Along with cleaning, painting, and waxing, the crew will spend countless hours during the upcoming summer weeks covering all bases to assure that Fairview MS/HS and Fairview Elementary School both shine with pride on opening day.


Says Phil Hetrick, head of maintenance and transportation, "The facilities are coming together nicely, The fresh look of new paint at both buildings along with a several revamped floors will be sure to give off a great first impression of the buildings. Our courteous, professional crew does a great job all year long.


"We're also very excited for the community to see the great new shine on the gym floors this upcoming fall. Hope to see you all at this year's extra-curricular events."


Our maintenance staff plays an ultra-important role in the daily success of our great district, and we'd like thank them for all they do.


Appearing on the recently refurbished high school gym floor are several members of the maintenance staff: (left to right) Joe Meyer, Steve Rohrs, Nick Rennollet, Phil Hetrick, and Jason Wermer. Missing from the photo are crew members Scott Heighland, Myra Wolfrum, and Tab Smith.

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"Who's Telling Your Story?" features the Central Local Technology Department

Students love using computers, and we love having our students use them. But before these wonderful educational tools can go into the hands of our students, a tremendous amount of work happens in the summer months to assure our staff, students, and parents that our students will be able to use them well and for appropriate purposes.


"It's been a busy summer here at Fairview when it comes to technology projects," says Adam Singer, director of technology. "We are managing a few extra projects this summer to ramp up our district's security that include deploying a new network-based PA system district-wide and deploying new network based classroom phones district-wide. These systems are integrated together to provide push button emergency lock down capabilities from any of the district's phones to help keep our students safe."


Other recent projects include migrating our eighteen virtualized servers to new hardware and the latest server operating systems; improving our disaster recovery system; deploying a new district wide network-based security camera system; deploying new, more efficient multi-function printers district-wide with PaperCut management which helps us cut printing costs and increases usability; rolling out BitLocker Encryption for all staff devices to keep our data safe; upgrading our elementary wireless network this summer to match the capacity of our high school and middle school wireless which support our Chromebook 1:1 program; doubling the amount of Chromebook carts at the elementary this summer to give our elementary students more access to technology; and lots and lots of new cabling to support all of our new network-based projects. The technology staff has found that just about any new project is possible, even in an older building, when you know how to find the right companies. Even with odd projects like putting in a new PA system, we still were able to find four companies that perform turn-key solutions to compete to get the best solution that fits our needs for the best price.


In addition, we would like to welcome our newest member of the technology team, John Echelbarger, to Central Local Schools. Mr. Echelbarger replaces Austin Bard, who recently accepted a position of director of technology for the Millcreek-West Unity Schools. Together, Mr. Singer and Mr. Echelbarger will help to continue the 21st Century education needed to succeed in today's ever-changing world.


"We are very fortunate to have such an excellent team," continued Singer, "from our maintenance crew who are working with us day-by-day to make this district an even better place for our students, to our quick and organized Superintendent and Treasury department who can let us know what is possible and who have the expertise to answer any tough questions that we have along the way. This summer while I, Mr. Singer, am busy managing summer projects and working on streamlining the management of our now 1300+ Chromebook, laptop, and desktop inventory, Mr. Echelbarger is busy repairing Chromebooks, developing on-demand technology training, installing Smartboards, prepping new Chromebook carts, and getting our PCs imaged and ready for the upcoming school year. We are looking forward to having the students back in the buildings to utilize the new technology so they can build the required skills to be successful in their future endeavors."


Shown are Mr. Echelbarger (left) and Mr. Singer.

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