CENTRAL LOCAL SCHOOLS

"Who's Telling Your Story?" -- October 18, 2019

Apple Event Sends Loud "Crunch" Through Buildings

Students, teachers, and staff members of the Central Local Schools recently participated in the “Great American Crunch,” a nationwide, healthy-eating activity whose goals are to promote good eating habits while using local produce to prepare healthy meals.


“The purpose of this event was to help promote ‘Farm to Plate’,” stated Mrs. Jill Speiser, family and consumer science teacher for Fairview MS/HS. This program ‘Farm to Plate’ encourages local consumers to purchase fruits and vegetables from local growers and to prepare meals that encourage people of all ages to eat several servings of fruit and vegetables each day.


Each of the buildings had its own unique flair to the event. The Middle School students kicked off the big day by performing their “crunch” at 8:15 during their enrichment time. As part of a cross-curricular lesson, Miss Addie Batt had her students complete a writing exercise where the students made apples come to life and explained how it felt to be the star of the day, then ultimately get eaten!


“As a part of the ‘Great Apple Crunch’, we were given the opportunity to enjoy a fresh apple during our homeroom time,” explained Batt. “These were enjoyed by most of the students. Some wear braces at this stage in their lives and couldn’t participate. Crunches were heard, smiles were produced, and photos prove the fun we had!”


Around 9:00 the High School students “crunched” during their enrichment time. A reporter from The Crescent News came and took a photographs of several students crunching along with their principal, Mr. Tim Breyman. As part of the experience, students in Speiser’s global foods class made apple sauce, where they also learned the process for correctly canning it for later consumption. Among those students involved in the apple sauce project was senior Adrian Metz.


“I thought it was a cool experience,” beamed Metz with a big smile on her face. “I’ve never made apple sauce before and getting to do it with my friends was cool. It was also a lot easier than I thought it would be.”


Finally, the Elementary students “crunched” all day! Mrs. Annie Zipfel was brave enough to make caramel apples with all of her 4th Graders. To assist with the event, several members of the Fairview Pride Club volunteered their time to help Zipfel complete this unique project.


“Since I teach reading, I like to do a few activities a year that involve following recipe directions,” noted Zipfel when asked what motivated her to take this event to the next level. “We talk as a class about how important it is to follow directions in order to get the outcome we want.


“I also chose to do the caramel apples because kids sometimes need a break! We are so go, go, go all week with academics. It is nice to slow down with a fun, engaging activity! I loved seeing how excited they got over the apples. Many of them had never had a caramel apple before!”


Speiser noted that this event was a total school event. “Custodians, office workers, and other staff members were encouraged to crunch on apples that were located in the individual offices,” concluded Speiser.


A big thank you goes out to the teachers and staff for their coordination and financial dedication to this fun experience. Special recognition goes to the teachers association, which graciously purchased the apples, to Miss Jessica Nagel for arranging to have the apples picked up at a local orchard, and to Miss Emily Wilitzer, Mrs. Beverly Singer, and Speiser, who were in charge of organizing the activities for the individual buildings.


Shown in the top picture below are several middle school students with their teachers taking part in the festivities. In the bottom picture, Mrs. Zipfel and her students prepare the caramel for dipping.

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Physics Students Learn the Importance of Structural Strength

When it comes to support systems, such as bridges, buildings, and other structures… well most people have pretty high expectations. Why? Because these structures are everywhere, and we expect them, without exception, to handle high volumes of weight. In the matter of bridges, we expect them to get motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians safely from one side to the other. However, what we take for granted can only be achieved when bridges and other similar structures are built to manage the necessary weight needed. Recently, Mrs. Sarah Dominique’s physics class completed a student-centered activity that required them to build support systems that would withstand a minimal amount of weight.


“To wrap up the unit on scientific inquiry, the students were assigned a project to build a geodesic dome completely out of newspapers and tape,” explained Dominique. “They had to incorporate the ideas of tension and compression as well as geometric shape strength to build the strongest dome possible.”


Students had a specific set of rules to follow, which made it tough for the domes to hold much weight without a well-thought-out weight-distribution system.


“Before starting their final dome, the students had to do research on weight distribution, geometric shape strength, and compression,” continued Dominique. “Once they had completed this research, they designed a ‘blue print’ of what their dome would look like. After the blue print was approved, they moved on to building a model out of toothpicks and gumdrops. This allowed them to explore the field of engineering and architecture as well as how to improve a design throughout each step of the process.


“After their model was built and approved, they were allowed to begin work on their domes. In order to pass, each dome had to hold at least 45 pounds. Everyone passed!” she exclaimed.


To add an extra twist to the experience, the project became a contest to see which team's dome could hold the most weight. The winning team consisted of Alistair Smith, Riley Lucas, and Austin Allen. Their dome held an astonishing 135 pounds.


When asked what he learned from this experience, Smith noted that “the structure of an object can provide even weak materials with strength. It was rather impressive that the smaller towers could hold as much weight as they did.”


Each member of the winning team played a different role in the success. Allen noted his role was to construct the newspaper roles.


“What I did for the group was have the maximum amount of newspaper sheets that can be rolled into one newspaper role,” explained Allen, who hoped the roles would provide the greatest amount of strength permitted by the outlined guidelines. “The most challenging step was angling the newspapers roles and taping them together” at the best angle for support.


A picture of the winning structure hangs proudly in Dominique’s classroom on her "Wall of Champions."


“This wall will consist of the winning team for each project we do throughout the year,” stated Dominique. “Their picture will remain on the wall as the "Newspaper Dome Record Holders" until they are beaten by another team in a future school year. I plan to continue this throughout my teaching career to allow students to compete for a chance to leave their mark on the physics classroom.”


Shown in the top photo below are Austin Allen, Riley Lucas, and Alistair Smith constructing the winning dome. The bottom photo paints a clear picture of how the strength of the domes was measured as Dominique Mansel-Playdell adds additional plates to the structure as Evan Mallett looks on with interest.

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Acts of Kindness in full swing at Fairview

The students in all three Fairview Schools continue to do amazing acts of kindness. After participating in a highly-inspirational presentation from motivational speaker Brian Williams, the students rose up to the challenge. Williams encouraged the children to give back to the community, and project number one was to collect and donate gently used shoes for those in need.


To get the ball rolling, Mrs. Sherrie Brown and her staff made the students and community aware of their goal.


“We announced it (shoe collection) each day, including doing other acts of kindness,” explained Brown. “We sent a letter home, and donations just started happening.”


In all, students received 168 shoe donations from the Fairview and surrounding community. Half of the shoes will be kept in the community, while the other half have been sent to an organization that will distribute the shoes to needy children in Africa.


High school students also did their part by sorting and packaging the shoes. Among those who helped sort and package was senior Riley Lucas.


“We sorted, counted, and organized them (for shipment),” explained Lucas.


When asked about how such work makes him feel, he quickly responded that “It means a lot. Obviously not everyone has as much as some people. They don’t have the opportunities. It’s a special feeling knowing that you’re helping other people,” concluded Lucas.


Shown in the picture below are several high school students surrounding Mr. Breyman with a large shipment of shoes ready to go.

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Mrs. Panico's Students Are Excited About Having an "Ahh!" School Year

Mrs. Kelly Panico has one simple question for her second graders this school year: Do you want to have an “Ahh!” year or a “Blah!” year? Of course, the resounding answer was to have an “Ahh!” year, and to help make that happen her students made elephant toothpaste.


“This was a science demonstration that created an oozing foam,” stated Panico. “When it went from a liquid to a foam, the students all said ‘Ahh’! So in a way, it was an analogy to having a good school year.”


Several students loved the experiment, including Will Mavis and Grace Zeedyk with each of these students having a slightly different description of the process and end result.


Explained Zeedyk: “We put chemicals in a science container, then we put water in it. It looked like a melted Popsicle,” she said with a big smile.


Mavis’ description was equally fun. “It looked like tooth paste and a sunset” referring to the orange and yellow colors. “We put food dye in it, and it foamed over,” he said, while also beaming with pride.


Here’s hoping this particular science lesson leads everyone at Fairview Elementary School to have an “Ahh!” year.


Shown below are Mrs. Panico’s students proudly showing off the end result of the elephant toothpaste.

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Fairview Teachers Continue To Secure Classroom Supplies Through Grant Writing

For Fairview Elementary School teachers Kim Beek, Taryn Monroe, Brooke Snyder, and Jami Speiser, finding innovative ways to enhance their classrooms has become a “grant writing thing.” All four of them currently have projects on the Donors Choose website. In addition, three of the four teachers completed projects either last school year or over the summer.


Flexible seating is a high priority in elementary classrooms right now, as it provides many benefits for younger learners. Said Snyder: “Kids love them (seating options). It improves their ability to sit for longer periods of time.”


Another innovative seating idea for keeping students’ attention during class is a stretchy band known as “Bouncing Off Some Energy.” They are large rubber bands that attach to the bottom of a student’s desk. Students can put their feet on the band and “bounce” their feet freely. Monroe uses them with her students with much success.


“It’s like a fidget for students to move while I’m teaching,” stated Monroe. “They are not distracting to anyone because they are down below the desk.” As far as keeping a student’s attention, she continued, “We had them last year, and they were phenomenal.”


The Young 5’s classroom, taught by Beek, is full of innovative equipment secured through available grants, such as a Light Table, Flexible Seating, and Trikes for Gross Motor Play. When asked what motivates her to pursue available grant dollars, Beek exclaimed, “Because I want things for my students, but I know that our district doesn’t always have the available funds to pay for everything.”


The Light Table has turned out to be a great learning tool for children.


“My students are using the light table to learn about letters, numbers, counting, and sorting,” beemed Beek with pride. “I am planning to create an additional project in the future to try to get additional math items along with STEM activities for the table.”


The kindergarten students in Speiser's room will soon be introduced to an art easel. Her goals are to enhance the reading experience.


“It’s a magnetic, write-on board,” explained Speiser. “We will use it for our big books that go along with our reading series. It will help with letter manipulation."


Everyone at Central Local Schools appreciates the hard work of our teachers and encourages the continued efforts of grant writing.


Shown in the top picture below is third grader Wyett Greenwalt demonstrating the rubber bands. In the bottom picture, students in the Young 5's program work with the Light Table.

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Innovative Seating Helps Younger Students

When Katrina Tonneas saw an avenue to create a better learning environment for her students, she jumped on the opportunity. Through a series of generous donations and grant money, she was able to raise the necessary $700 and purchase several new “desks” that provide her students a unique style. The veteran intervention specialist explained that the flexible seating and lapdesks enhance many different forms of learning.


“The students are more engaged, and they’re attention is a lot better,” stated Tonneas. “When they're grounded (their feet are on the floor), they're better able to concentrate.”


The seating also allows for students to have movement breaks while building up key muscles without them even knowing it, especially stomach and back muscles.


“The seats help create stronger cores,” continued Tonneas. “Strong core muscles are important for a person’s overall health.”


The set-up also allows for enhanced student-teacher interaction.


“We (teachers) can see better what students are doing, which allows us to provide even more support,” concluded Tonneas.


Shown below are several students showing off their new seating arrangement.

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Makerspace Provides Great Educational Opportunities for Students

The Fairview Middle School staff continues its mission of providing student-centered and DIY (do it yourself) Education for all students. To assist in this mission, teachers make frequent use of an excellent educational classroom known as Makerspace located in the middle school wing.


By definition, a Makerspace is an area in a school, library, or community center that provides children with educational materials that range in high-tech scale, such as 3D printers and robots, to low-tech scale, such as Legos and cardboard used to design, create, invent, and tinker.


"The Makerspace at Fairview Middle School has both high-tech and low-tech materials for its students and so much more!" exclaimed 7th grade science teacher Trisha Schlachter. "Today, you may see students operating robots through an obstacle course that they designed, and tomorrow you may see students printing a miniature version of an endangered animal with the 3D printer."


The Makerspace is available to all teachers in all subjects. In addition, the district employs a gifted instructor who teaches two STEAM -- science, technology, engineering, art and math

-- courses each school day.


How did the school acquire all these materials?


"Fairview Middle School has a great team of teachers willing to write grants, create crowd-sourcing pages, and simply ask for donations," explained Schlachter.


To date, the school has received nearly $2,500 in STEAM materials, almost exclusively through grants, including spheros, ozobots, and snap circuit kits. Most recently, Fairview Middle School was awarded a $1,000 check from North Western Electric Cooperative’s Operation Round-Up program to help purchase a new 3D printer.


"Faiview Middle School truly defines the concept of TEAM where Together Everyone Achieves More!" concluded Schlachter.


For more information about this great program, contact the middle school office.


In the picture below, Darin Thorp, President/CEO of North Western Electric, presents a check to Mrs. Schlachter.

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Local Group Donates Backpacks

Acts of kindness never get old, and a recent donation of backpacks by the Defiance V-Twin Motorcycle Club is a shining example of such kindness. Recently, several members of the club met Superintendent Steve Arnold at Estel Chevrolet in Defiance to pass out six large boxes of backpacks for elementary and middle school students who may otherwise not be able to afford one.


"A friend of mine once told me that we were put on this earth to help other people," stated Arnold. "I've always remembered that advice, and this example of kindness from the V-Twin Motorcycle Club certainly backs up that philosophy."


From pink and blue "My Little Pony" to scarlet and gray Ohio State, students have had an array of choices. Arnold stated that over half the backpacks have been claimed so far.


"This is another example of how the people in this community rally around one another to help provide the essentials. It's so impressive and encouraging,"


When asked how and when he learned about the offer, Arnold explained: "My assistant, Laura Brady, made most of the arrangements. Someone from the club contacted her to say they would be at Estel's on August 15. So I made sure I was there.


"When I arrived to pick up boxes, everyone was exceptionally friendly. We are very grateful to the V-Twin Motorcycle Club for helping our students."


Several backpacks are still available, so students needing one should stop by either the middle school or elementary office for assistance.


Shown in the top picture below are seniors Megan Leichty, Josiah Adkinis, Samantha Vance, Blake Smith, Nevaeh Midgett, and Simon Hammon showing off a number of backpacks. In the bottom picture, Mr. Arnold is seen posing with members of the club.

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2019 Manufacturing Camp a Smashing Success

School may have been out for the summer, but the recess from classes didn't affect several middle school students from participating in a hands-on, student-friendly learning experience known as Summer Manufacturing Camp. Coordinated through the combined efforts of Fairview Middle School and the Defiance County Economic Development Office, several FMS students enjoyed four days of on-the-go activities.


Among those attending camp this year was freshman Dylan Winger, who had nothing but praise for the four-day event. "It was a great experience," he quipped with a big smile. "I learned quite a lot and did things that I wouldn't normally be able to do such as driving big equipment."


On-site visits to Nemco Foods in Hicksville, Spangler Candy Company in Bryan, B&B Molded Plastics in Defiance, Miller Brothers Construction in Archbold, and the Four County Career Center Construction Lab in Archbold were among the many highlights of the camp. For seventh grader Logan Hardy, he beamed with excitement when describing the Miller Brothers visit.


"I got to drive a really big water truck," exclaimed Hardy, unable to hide his enthusiasm. "It turned in the center. It was a bit nerve-racking at the beginning, but it got better.


"It was really fun because they had a bunch of different equipment set up that we got to try out. We also answered questions, and I won a pair of safety glasses."


Along with the visits to the area companies, students also participated in various in-house activities, including building with large Tinker Toys, scavenger hunts, and life skills stations.


When asked what he would say to other students about future events, Winger noted, "If you're not doing anything next summer, and you're interested in figuring out what you may want to do in the future, then give this camp a try."


Among the many adults who worked behind the scenes to make this a successful, educational happening was middle school counselor Adam Brickner. However, Brickner was quick to pass along credit to others.


"The positive and productive collaboration between Fairview Middle School and the Defiance County Economic Development office is what made the planning and implementation of the camp so successful," stated Brickner. "A special thank you to Carla Hinkle from the economic development office for being the catalyst behind this successful program in Defiance County."


For information about participation in future camps, parents are encouraged to contact the middle school office and to speak with either Mr. Brickner or Mrs. Geis.


Shown in the top picture below is an instructor from Four County CC demonstrating the importance of accurate measurements. The participants and adults gather for a group photo (bottom picture) at the conclusion of camp.

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Excitement Is High For New School Year

As students return for the 2019-2020 school year, spirits are high in all three buildings. To help express this excitement, the middle school staff gathered for fun, "Welcome Back" picture.


From everyone at Central Local Schools, let's make this one of the best years ever.

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Fairview Sixth Graders Are Introduced to Lego Mindstorm

Sixth graders in the Fairview Middle School STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math) class have recently completed the Lego Mindstorm EV3 unit with much success. This hands-on unit, facilitated by Mrs. Sara Schaper, is a week-long project involving a software platform produced by Lego for the development of programmable robots based on Lego building blocks.


Several students found this unit to be both a lot of fun and challenging at the same time. Among them were Alexa VanArsdalen and AyDan Judd, both of whom Schaper noted were strong students in this lesson.


“It was pretty fun,” stated Judd, who noted that there were challenges along the way. “In engineering, if something doesn’t work right the first time, you can bounce back. It took us multiple times to get it right. At first, it was kind of irritating, but once we figured it out, we had a lot fun.”


Fairview MS has placed much emphasis this year on introducing engineering to its students with special emphasis on getting girls interested in this field. It has clearly made an impression on VanArsdalen, who one day wants to make a difference in the veterinary field.


“I would like one day to help build machines that help fix veterinary equipment,” she noted. “In building and coding, it teaches you engineering. It was pretty fun.”


Central Local Schools partners with Northwest Ohio Computer Association (NWOCA) to provide this lesson to all sixth graders. Chris Malanga, Educational Integration Specialist for NWOCA and a certified Lego Mindstorm instructor, has come to Fairview every quarter for a full week to work with each sixth grade STEAM class on this special unit.


“In small groups, Mr. Malanga leads each group through the steps in creating their LEGO robot,” explained Schaper. “He teaches the class how to build the robot, bring it to life, and then command and play. He then creates challenges for them to complete. Those students that are pretty savvy with the programming are then given extra challenges to tackle.”


His efforts are greatly appreciated.


“I would like to thank Mr. Malanga for coming here four different times this year for a full week each time,” continued Schaper. “He really has a knack for working with kids.”


Shown in the picture below are sixth graders Kiana Honemann, Alexa VanArsdalen, and Zach Pettit working as a group to assemble their robot.

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High School Counselor Attends Army National Guard Educator Event

Affording college tuition is often a burdensome deterrent for many of today’s aspiring high school graduates. To help stem this issue and to learn additional ways for all Fairview HS students to afford college – and not have large student loan debts to repay – Lori Polter, Fairview High School counselor, recently attended the Army National Guard Educator Event at the military base in North Canton, Ohio. The main objective of this event was to educate school personnel on the benefits of service in the Army National Guard and to outline additional sources of revenue for aspiring college students.


“Those in attendance received information on the Ohio Tuition Program and the GI Bill, which can both be used by enlistees or their dependents to pay for college,” stated Polter. “Recruiters were on hand to interact with us and answer questions that we had about the enlistment process.”


Attendees participated in several information sessions, where they learned about various career opportunities in the Guard, such as military police (MP), transport specialist, pilot, mechanic, and cybersecurity specialist. To provide visual and real-life experiences, attendees were provided with an inspiring tour while discussing different predicaments students and may face one day.


“We were given a tour of the hangar, during which we were allowed to climb into helicopters and other transport vehicles that are utilized at this facility. In addition we learned about opportunities the Army National Guard offers to high schools, such as classroom presentations on decision making, one day "boot camps" for sports teams, and public service displays on such things as the dangers of impaired driving through the use of simulation goggles.


“The highlight of the day was definitely a forty-minute ride in a CH-47F Chinook helicopter,” she exclaimed. “Another great part about the flight that I learned at the completion of it, was that the pilot was female. It is always exciting to share stories with our female students about women in the work force who are breaking down gender barriers.


“It was an amazing experience I won’t soon forget.”


Shown in the picture below are this year’s attendees just before boarding the helicopter.

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Four County Students to Begin Employment Following Signing Day Event

Four County Career Center is a highly-valued educational partner with Central Local Schools and Fairview High School. Each year, several members of the junior and senior classes make the decision to attend Four County to learn a trade or skill that will lead to a career of choice.


To help showcase its many talented students, Four County recently hosted the first "Defiance County Skilled Trades Signing Day" where students from the five Defiance County high schools, who have signed employment agreements with area employers, were honored. As part of this program, students were called one-by-one to the front of the gallery to sign a document and be photographed with family members and school personnel.


Fairview is proud to have had three young men be part of this nice event:


* Eric Culler, who studied Agricultural/Diesel Mechanics. He will go to work for Culler Cattle and Grain, located near Edgerton, while continuing his education at Northwest State Community College.


* Blaine Gier-Grant, who studied Auto Collision Repair. He will go to work for Stevie G's Restoration, located near Antwerp.


* Logan Joice, who studied Welding Fabrication. He will go to work for Allied Moulded Products, located in Bryan.


When asked about his choice to attend Four County, Culler knows he made the best choice for his future.


"We've had a really good time here," stated Culler in reference to both himself and his classmates. "It's been a wonderful experience to come here with all the opportunities we were offered."


Gier-Grant echoed his classmate's sentiments: "It was a great experience."


From everyone at Fairview High School, we congratulate Eric, Blaine, and Logan on this great accomplishment and wish them well as they enter the next chapters of their lives.


Shown in the picture below are our three distinguished students (Culler, Gier-Grant, and Joice) with high school principal, Mr. Tim Breyman, following the event.

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Fairview Senior Makes Good on Her Prediction

Four short years ago, several chapter members of the Fairview Future Farmers of America -- better known as FFA -- were sitting at the State FFA Convention watching student after student from other schools cross the stage to be recognized for their excellence in the program. After witnessing this exciting events for several minutes, Fairview's students starting asking one another a simple question: "Why isn’t that us?" According to Miss Jessica Nagel, the first-year FFA instructor at that time, the answer was also simple.


"The short answer was because we didn’t apply for the awards," stated Nagel, who is now in her fourth year working for Central Local Schools. But in that moment, all would change.

"There was a freshman girl who said to me, “'I am going to win one of those awards before I graduate,' and from that day on she has been working on making that goal a reality."


That girl is, Rose Zeedyk, who will graduate with the Class of 2019 on Sunday.


Agriculture Education is made up of three parts: Classroom instruction, FFA, and SAE (Supervised Agricultural Experience). When a student enrolls in Agriculture Education, they automatically join the FFA program. FFA is the awards and leadership portion of the program. The SAE portion involves projects or jobs of the students' choosing that help them reach their career goals.


"Once a student chooses a project, whether it's raising a crop or an animal, or getting a job or working in a landscaping business, they have to do the work and keep records of all of their hours and tasks that they have completed," explained Nagel. "Once they have accumulated a couple of years’ worth of records, they have the ability to begin to apply for awards. These awards compare students across the area, state, and nation to other students that have similar projects, and the best projects receive proficiency awards."


To begin her quest, Rose began cash renting ground to raise crops, while working for her dad to learn how to manage her own farming operation. Now as a senior she has made good on that commitment, as she was awarded 1st place in Diversified Crop Production, 2nd place in Fiber and Oil Crop Production, and 2nd place in Grain Production, all for the crops she raises on the ground she rents.


Through the three years of this project, Rose has planted and harvested 125 acres of soybeans and 99 acres of corn. She decided to cash rent land from her dad to grow these crops. Through these projects she has used different methods to make a profit.


She became interested in this project by growing up on a grain farm and constantly being involved in the responsibilities of grain farming. As a freshman, she set the goal of purchasing her own farm ground before she graduated from high school. She has accomplished that goal by purchasing 79 acres for the upcoming planting year that she will be farming in addition to the ground she cash rents.


“Through my years of renting ground and purchasing my own ground, I have solidified my spot in the family farm operation that will continue with me as I get older," stated Zeedyk. “Through my time in SAE, I have transitioned from a girl doing what her dad said, to a business women making management decisions for her farm and herself.


"During my first year, my dad told me what I was going to do and how I was to do it. He used activities and learning tools to teach me different germination rates and chemical application practices. My second year, I was allowed to make decisions and did all machine operation on my own. I made decisions while having conversations with my dad to best utilize his ground. This year, I made management decisions on my own and profited from my crops.”


As a result of her dedication and hard work, she will be representing Fairview and the Ohio FFA Association as she submits her application for the National FFA Diversified Crop Production Proficiency award later this summer. We wish her all the best of luck.


Pictured below are Rose (third from left) with fellow FFA members Garrett Bennett, Cassie Mavis, Kaitlyn Zeedyk, Clair Shininger, and Tristan McGuire.

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Central Local History on Display in MS/HS Library

The Fairview Pride Club, in conjunction with the superintendent's office, has kicked off a new initiative. With the goal of continuing to recognize the proud history of our great school district, the Pride Club is actively seeking memorabilia from the four original school districts that came together in 1958 to form Central Local Schools: Farmer Local School, Mark Center Local School, Ney Local School, and Sherwood Local School.


“One of the first groups to visit me when I arrived this past summer was the Fairview Pride Club,” said Mr. Steve Arnold, superintendent. “I met with Dan Hasch, Susan Zeedyk, and Chery Wonderly. We had a great meeting and agreed that we would pursue this initiative. It went over very well during my time as the superintendent at Wayne Trace, so I thought we would introduce the idea here as well.”


After advertising the idea in the first two district newsletters, Tom Shininger (and his wife Gloria) brought Mr. Arnold two unique items: a 1938 Ney Hawks senior autograph book and a 1948 Mark Center Eagles letterman’s sweater. Not long after that, Mrs. Zeedyk brought several items from the early years of Central Local Schools as well as a book about the history of Defiance County basketball. Because the book goes back to the middle part of the 20th Century, it contains articles and other information about the original four school districts.


Once a few items had been loaned, the discussion turned to where the items would be housed. “We’ve looked at several different options, but concluded that the MS/HS library is our best choice for now,” stated Arnold. “We currently have about six items on display and hope to see that number grow as the word gets out to the community.”


Arnold encourages anyone who has items that they are willing to loan to the school as part of this initiative to contact him in the central office. As part of the process, he will craft a small placard indicating the origin and owner of the items, which will be included in the display. In addition, all items would be on loan and returned to the owner(s) upon request.


"We think this is a creative way to honor our history while making use of some items that otherwise may be folded up in a box in someone's closet or attic," concluded Arnold.


Shown in the picture below is the current display. The blue sweater in the forefront is the above-referenced sweater from Mark Center.

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Fairview Elementary School Honors Volunteers

As the saying goes, “It takes a village to raise a child.” At Fairview Elementary School, this theme is alive and well. Along with the dedicated teachers and staff members providing a solid educational foundation, a large number of community members volunteer many hours of their time to enhance the overall educational process. In place for several years now, this program and the volunteers receive glowing praise from building principal, Mrs. Sherrie Brown.


“By having mentors and volunteers at Fairview Elementary, it allows the children to receive one-on-one attention in order to strengthen their academics, verbal skills, and confidence while building a special bond with the person that provides them the help and support that they need,” said Brown about the great people involved. “Our mentors and volunteers hold a special place in our heart since they provide us with so much time and energy that helps not only our teachers but our students as well.”


Ranging in age from high school students to retired senior citizens, the volunteers provide an array of services, including copying, laminating, and working directly with students on school work and social skills. Among the high school students involved is senior Baylee Grine, who has been volunteering at the elementary school for two years. When asked about her motivation for signing up for this program, she simply stated, “Just helping the kids. I think it’s a good program, and I like it a lot.”


Knowing how much help to provide is something Grine has learned over time. “I give them as much help as they need without providing the answer.”


To help show its gratitude to this dedicated group of people, school administrators, cafeteria staff, and teaching staff teamed up to provide lunch and pass out a few tokens of appreciation at a recent event held in the elementary library on April 25. Nearly thirty people attended this event.


Prior to the meal, Brown addressed the crowd and glowingly announced: “Thank you to all of our mentors and volunteers for providing us with your time. We are forever grateful.”


Shown in the picture below is a number of this year's attendees at the luncheon.

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Wobble Chairs Help Young Students Develop Core Muscles

When students in Ms. Kim Beek's Young 5's classroom enter her room each day, they are doing much more than just learning academic and social skills. With the help of seats known as Wobble Chairs, they are also developing necessary core muscles that will help them in their everyday lives.


Core muscle development has been proven to improve balance and stability while making most physical activities easier to accomplish. It also leads to better overall health of both children and adults alike, leading to more focus and better attendance.


Ms. Beek loves what she’s seeing so far with her students: “These options are working out very well for the Young 5's students this year. These options are giving them the opportunities to move as they work, build their core muscles, and provide options for those students who learn better in their own developmental way.”


To help meet the classroom’s needs, Ms. Beek used an available source of revenue for schools known as DonorsChoose.org. Through the generosity of many people both in and out of the district, having a full set of chairs became a reality fairly quickly.


“We received fifteen seat cushions and six gray Wobble Chairs from sixteen donors on the website www.donorschoose.org,” she stated with a big smile on her face. “We are very grateful for this website and the opportunity to get these items for our classroom! We plan to create another project to get a light table for our classroom.”


Shown below are three of the Wobble Chairs used by students each day in the Young 5's classroom.

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High School Engineering Students Attempt to Build Earthquake-Resistant Buildings

What would happen if an earthquake hit an area near you? How much unusual force could the buildings endure? Would the structures still be standing the next day? Students in Ray Breininger's Engineer Your World course attempted to answer these questions and more through a recent, hands-on unit.


"Students studied earthquake science and current earthquake-resistant buildings," stated Breininger. "Students were challenged to build and design a safer building to withstand an earthquake frequency between .5 to 2 Hz while staying within a budgeted amount."


The term Hz is an abbreviation for hertz, a unit of measurement named after German physicist Heinrich Hertz that measures the rise and fall of a wave per second.


Equipped with balsa wood and hot glue, the students formed teams and began construction. The formation of teams added another interesting dynamic to the overall goal of building a strong structure.


"At the beginning of the year, we took a test to see what kind of workers we are," said sophomore Tyler Martin. "I was partnered with Macy Driskell. We were both labeled as head workers."


When asked about working with another head worker, Martin noted, "It was kind of difficult because we both had strong ideas. We had to work together to make a final tower. In the end, we found out that both of our ideas were better than one separate idea."


While constructing the models, students used shaker tables and Excel to collect data on their designs. After testing their designs, they built a final tower utilizing their data and retested them. In fact, some groups tested their designs multiple times before they eventually passed.


"The goal was to stay under a certain G Hz," added senior Eric Guzman. "We achieved the goal by testing different kinds of models. We did four tests of different models before one passed."


Here's hoping for no earthquakes in the area, but one set of Fairview seniors has taken the first steps to learn the necessary requirements to construct the strongest buildings possible.


Shown in the photo below is an example of a team's designs.

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Students Combine Math Skills with Fundraising for Children's Medical Research

For over twenty-five years, students at Fairview Middle School (FMS) have teamed up with the caring Central Local community to support St.Jude's Children's Research Hospital through the annual St. Jude's Math-A-Thon. This year was no exception, as students raised more than $2,000 during the week-long, academic-based event that concluded earlier this month.


St. Jude's, founded in 1962 by comedian/entertainer Danny Thomas, specializes in providing untiring research and medical care for children. With the motto of "no child should die in the dawn of life," St. Jude's has raised millions and millions of dollars through charitable donations to help save children's lives. Annual events such as the FMS Math-A-Thon are proof that anyone can make a difference in a child's life.


The event itself requires students to complete a variety of math problems. Pledges are made for each number of problems completed correctly, so the more correct answers students have, the higher the donations will be.


"I've been involved with this event since 1994," said Beth Bechtol, event coordinator and seventh grade math teacher. "Over the years, I know we've raised over $50,000."


Prior to this event coming to FMS, two teachers from Farmer Elementary School started it there. "Mrs VonDeylan and Mrs. Rhodes brought the idea to the middle school when the sixth graders were moved here (the current middle school)," stated Bechtol. "We've kept it going ever since."


Among the several students who stepped up to the plate was sixth grader Elizabeth Bok. When asked about what motivated her, she stated very humbly, "Most of my donations came from my business called B4Caring. I used my own money because I really wanted to help other kids."


It doesn't get much better than that.


From everyone at Fairview Middle School we say thank you to the Central Local community for supporting the students' efforts to support St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital.


Shown below are several middle school students who participated in this year's event.

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Local Candy Company Provides a "Sensory" Lesson for Sixth Graders

Representatives from Spangler Candy Company in Bryan recently visited the Fairview Middle School STEAM class to present an interactive, hands-on lesson on how a person's five senses all play a key role in the enjoyment of various foods.


Facilitated by Spangler employees DaWanda VanBuskirk and Chery Thomas, students were introduced to each individual sense and its effects on the pleasure of eating. Although taste and smell are pretty obvious when it comes to the enjoyment of food, sight, touch, and hearing are also highly important. How the food feels on your tongue and mouth, the crunching noises you hear when you eat, and certainly how a food looks are all enormously important.


VanBuskirk stressed that consumers will continue to purchase products that fulfill their sensory expectations. If not, they will rarely purchase a product again if it doesn’t.


Students also learned that much effort and testing goes into the planning of various flavors in hopes that customers will continue purchasing their favorites.


“They (VanBuskirk and Thomas) explained the details of their jobs in the lab including such tasks as developing the flavor profiles for existing and new flavor projects,” stated gifted education teacher Sara Schaper. “They work with several flavor companies throughout the United States to create just the right flavor for their products.”


Color also plays a huge role in the tasting experience of food. To help illustrate this point, students were given several colorless pieces of candy to sample with the goal of identifying the flavor. Said Schaper: “Students were given five suckers without color and a list of the top flavors. Their task was to taste each one and try to guess the flavor. The students really enjoyed this activity.”


One student, Nevaeh Grond-Chapman, was the only student able to name each flavor. She explained how she was able to name a few of them.


“I’m not allowed to have candy much, but I was able to taste the blue berry,” she said with a smile on her face. “I recognized the cotton candy from a carnival I went to, and I recognized the fruity pebble from the cereal. I had that for breakfast this morning,” she exclaimed.


Many thanks go out to Spangler and its staff for providing this educational activity.


Shown in the picture below is VanBuskirk facilitating the “flavor-guessing” activity.

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Fairview High School Science Students Participate in Annual Science Museum

Science education remains alive and well in the halls of Fairview High School as evidenced by the fourth annual Fairview HS Science Museum, held February 28 and March 1 in the MS gymnasium.


Under the guidance of teachers Amy Woodring, Jacob Panico, and Ginny Pettenger, students in the upper-level science courses, which include Anatomy & Physiology I, Anatomy & Physiology II, Honors Chemistry II, and Physics, presented interactive displays for small groups of elementary students on both days. Seventeen different high school groups used a hands-on approach to introduce a multitude of different scientific topics. New this year was a two-day approach, allowing more time for more elementary students to be involved. Thursday's presentations included students in grade 3-5, while students in grades K-2 had their turn on Friday.


"The two-day format was new this year but was very well received by the elementary teachers and students," stated Woodring when asked about the new setup. "We were able to take more time and include more students this way."


Concerning topics and groups sizes, students were given a fair amount of latitude. However, they also needed to stay within the bounds of certain expectations.


"The high school students were allowed to pick their own topics, but the topics were required to be within each classes' discipline," explained Woodring. "For example, the Anatomy & Physiology presentations needed to be about something related to the human body."


The group sizes ranged from three-five students, depending on the class size. In addition, many students (all juniors and seniors) are currently taking more than one science course, and students were required to research and present a project for each class for which they are enrolled. This year, senior Kamryn Bolland is enrolled in three science courses, so she had three projects to complete. In order to avoid conflicts, one of her groups presented on Thursday and the other two groups presented on Friday. Students who were in more than one group divided their time between the groups on their presentation day.


"This experience was challenging in a productive way as far as learning about time management and working with different groups of people," explained Bolland about her daunting task of completing three projects. "I also needed to be creative with three different subject matters."


When asked about taking multiple science classes this year, Bolland said, "I took three science classes to challenge myself as a senior even though I'm not planning to go into a science-related field." Bolland's plans right now are to major in early elementary education.


Preparation for this year's event was lengthy and intense, as each class began the research and preparation the week before Christmas break, working on the projects periodically through the last week of February. Adding to the pressure was the fact that this unit is a large part of the students' 3rd quarter grade in each of their respective classes.


When discussing what all she observed from this year's event, Woodring noted, "It is always very interesting to see how the high school students respond to the elementary students and vice versa. The high school students are able to experience what teachers go through in regards to trying to keep their students' attention and what it is like to teach the same thing multiple times. I think this gives some of them a new appreciation for their teachers."


Shown in the top picture below is Alexis Rucker providing a hands-on demonstration of her research of Boo Bubbles. In the bottom picture, Luke Skinner and Jakob Backhaus take turns explaining the effects of Instant Ice.

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Middle School Girls Experience Engineering Day at University of Toledo

For many years, girls have either shied away from or been discouraged from pursuing career paths in the world of engineering. After all, this has for too long been known as a profession for men. Well, the University of Toledo along with several schools in Northwest Ohio, including Central Local Schools, are taking notice. Add to the fact that thousands of jobs just in the state of Ohio remain unfilled due to a lack of qualified workers, prompting schools to begin a serious effort to attract girls into the world of engineering.


To help with this effort, twenty-seven girls and three chaperones from Fairview Middle School ventured to the "Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day" at UT on February 21.


Facilitated by a panel of practicing female engineers, the professionals spoke to the girls about the need for more girls to pursue the field of engineering as a career and the fact that there are many available jobs for applicants with the right training and skill set.


"This experience was an introduction to the different disciplines within the engineering fields," stated Anne Frank, sixth grade science teacher and one of the three chaperones to attend the event. "A panel of women answered questions about engineering and how this field might interest girls. The professionals also engaged the students in several hands-on activities to show them what they may do on a daily basis in various engineering professions."


Among other planned events, the girls built and tested stick bridges, created Jelly marbles, and explored energy with solar panels. As part of the solar energy project, one large light represented the sun. This light shone on a panel, which was connected to several different wires. The energy from the large light produced enough power to turn a fan blade, make smaller lights shine, and make a speaker create a buzzing noise. Needless to say, the students had a great time.


"It was really fun because we could ask questions to the actual women working as engineers," stated sixth grader Cheyenne Zeedyk, one of the twenty-seven girls who attended. Among other things, "we learned how to make bubbles from bubble tea. It was really cool."


Shown in the top picture below are several Fairview students experimenting with the solar panels. In the bottom picture below, the girls pose for a group picture.

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Fairview Middle Schoolers Perform Well at Math Counts Event

Several Fairview middle school students will need to make room on their trophy cases after successfully participating in a regional Math Counts competition held recently at the Northwest Ohio ESC in Archbold.


The Competition Series, which is open for students in grades 6-8, showcases four levels of live, in-person math competitions: school, chapter, state, and national. Each level of competition is comprised of four rounds: Sprint, Target, Team, and Countdown Round. Altogether, the rounds are designed to take about three hours to complete and require an intense amount of preparation, concentration, and dedication in order to be successful.


"Thirteen of our students have been working with me during Club/Activity time on Tuesdays and Thursdays to prepare," stated eighth grade math teacher Beverly Singer. "Recently, I've only had the ten students that I took to the competition, so we really geared up our preparation in hopes of having success."


And successful, many students were. Six students participated as individuals with eighth grader Michael Mansel-Pleydell placing third overall, and eighth grader Quinton Smith finishing sixth overall in their grade-level competitions. In the team competition, the quartet of Clayton VanArsdalen, Lester Smith, Mansel-Pleydell, and Quinton Smith placed second overall.


As an added bonus, any individual finishing in the top six overall was invited to enter the Countdown round, where Mansel-Pleydell finished a highly-respectable fourth place.


"Twelve schools competed, so there was a great deal of good competition," said Singer. "I'm very proud of these young people. They did most of the work and are very smart."


Mansel-Pleydell had all positives to report. "It was a new experience for me. It challenged me, and I really enjoyed it." When asked about students participating in this event in future years, he was quick to note: "Come prepared."


Quinton Smith echoed much of what his teammate stated. "It was fun competing. We also worked real hard to prepare for this event. I'm glad I was able to go."


By placing in the top two, the above-mentioned team has qualified for the state competition, scheduled for March 9 in Columbus, OH.


Great job, math students!


Shown in the top picture below is our group of participants, along with Mrs. Singer (center back). In the bottom picture below, the second-place team of Lester Smith, Clayton VanArsdalen, Michael Mansel-Pleydell, and Quinton Smith poses with Mrs. Singer and some of the hardware they collected.

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Central Shares Teams Up With Fairview Staff and Students To Provide Help For Area Families

Unfortunately, tragedy can strike at any time to anyone. Fortunately, many giving people and organizations in our great school district have stepped up over the years to help families dealing with such hardships. Among them is Central Shares.


What is Central Shares?


"Central Shares was originally established to help families and children in the Central Local School District meet their basic needs and feel more accepted, especially at Christmas time," stated Betty Penner, president of the organization. "Later, Central Shares added helping families with school supplies and back-to-school clothes."


However, their generosity doesn't stop there. Recently, two local families lost their homes and many of their belongings to devastating fires on the same weekend. But through the great generosity of numerous people and the coordination of Central Shares, financial assistance was available.


"In a time of need like this, it just shows how willing people in our community are to help," said high school counselor Lori Polter, who played a key role in the collection process. "As soon as it was announced, donations of all sizes started rolling in."


The mission for Central Shares continues to evolve, but this organization will continue its great work with one main objective in mind: "The mission of Central Shares is to help families in the Central Local School District meet basic needs. We especially strive to make life better for the children in these families," concluded Penner.


In the picture below, Mrs. Penner (center) poses with school representatives Mrs. Amanda Troyer (left) and Mrs. Polter.

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Giving Back to the Community: Fairview FCA Does That And Much More

From raising money for families in need, to visiting residents in an assisted living facility, to developing tomorrow's leaders, the Fairview Fellowship of Christian Athletes is a group with a vision. More commonly known as FCA, as many as 100 students are involved in a variety of activities, all of which are designed to provide services for the Fairview community.


FCA meets before and after school to plan events and to carry out its mission. Meetings, normally scheduled for the first and third Fridays of each month, are an opportunity for students to organize the next events, as well lead a lesson or listen to a guest speaker.


"The Fairview FCA does lots of work behind the scenes to make Fairview a great place to go to school," stated Jacob Panico, who is in his tenth year of voluntarily leading this group. "The work involves outreach activities to get lots of students involved, meetings to raise up leaders within the group, fundraising to help out community members , working with elementary students as positive role models, and learning and teaching the Gospel message."


As stated above, raising money for those in need has been a key objective of the Fairview FCA. In fact, this group of ambitious young people has raised over $1500 in the past two years, which has gone directly to families with immediate needs in our district. Current and future fund-raising efforts will continue. In fact, a large effort just came to completion with a sizable donation being made to two families in the district who suffered devastating loses.


"We raised money for families in our district whose homes were recently destroyed by fire," stated junior Adrianna Roth. "We collected money during lunch from students willing to donate and from parents at the Little Hoopsters events in January. Many people stepped forward and contributed. We are very grateful to these people who donated money to help those in need."


Large-group activities have become very popular. On Tuesday evening before Thanksgiving break, the students organized the 6th annual "Class Warfare", which pitted the four high school classes against one another in friendly games of competition. Eventually won by the seniors, games included dodge ball, Bible trivia, and scooter races. Over eighty students participated.


"We spent numerous hours planning this glorifying event," said sophomore Ryan Richards. "Students came and enjoyed themselves while bonding with one another and growing their leadership skills. This was a successful event."


In the month of January, over thirty high school FCA members volunteered each Saturday morning to help teach Fairview 2nd and 3rd graders the skills of basketball. Along with leading drills and coaching games, FCA students shared a positive message about being STRONG. The message behind STRONG is "I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, and I have remained faithful."


"I think all the kids really enjoyed playing basketball and spending time with their friends," stated sophomore Brook Mavis. "The high school students really enjoyed helping them out as well. We also used this time to teach the kids about being strong mentally and physically even at times where they're dealing with struggles."


Finally, a number of students recently visited Genesis Health Care in Bryan on a Sunday afternoon, interacting with residents and delivering Valentines.


"We were doing things in school that involved students, but we wanted to try to find a way to give back to the community," said senior Riley Collins. "We thought this would be a great way to get students involved in a very relaxed environment while bringing some happiness to some people who may not have many visitors."


In the top picture below, students listen to testimonies from Brook and Cassie Mavis during a large-group event. In the bottom picture below, several students pose with a resident of Genesis Health Care after she received her Valentine note.

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Eighth Graders Dive Into A Potential Career As Part of English/Language Arts Project

Through the experienced tutelage of English/language arts teacher Tracy Robinson and intervention specialists Brittany Yaichner and Stacy Nadler, the Fairview eighth graders recently took a deep dive into a chosen career as part of a Career Fair project.


Done annually, this unit drives home several of the required state content standards. Said Robinson, "This unit hits many standards, including research, writing informative text, conveying information, and determining relevance of content."


With much anticipation, this unit began back in December with a career survey and a career day. The bulk of the lesson then centered on a well-expressed explanation, subsequent in-depth research, and the publishing of a research paper, all which focused on a chosen career topic. The unit culminated with a full-day-visit to Four County Career Center, Northwest State Community College, and the APT Manufacturing Company in Hicksville.


"The field trip was amazing," said Robinson. "The students got to see a number of concrete, real-life manufacturing and engineering jobs. It opened our students' eyes to other opportunities available in today's workforce."


To bring completion to this endeavor, the students presented a Career Fair project on February 7, 2019, as the final portion of their career unit. The Career Fair project consisted of the students making a tri-fold presentation board that contained information they learned while researching their chosen career topic. After the tri-fold board was constructed, the students formally presented information about their careers to the sixth and seventh-grade students who visited their stations, all done in a structured environment and set up in the high school and middle school gyms. The sixth and seventh-grade students were then given questions to complete, and the answers were derived from both the information placed upon the eighth graders’ tri-folds and the information received from the eighth graders’ presentations.


"I felt the students were well prepared with their presentations, and I got many compliments from other teachers and other students on how seriously our students had taken this project," summarized Robinson.


This Career Unit allowed the eighth-grade students a chance to research their chosen career and makes it a more realistic experience. Reactions to their choices were mixed.


Stated Robinson: "By the end of this career unit, some students were more excited than ever about their chosen careers, while others were not certain they wanted to pursue that career, or in some cases were absolutely certain they did not want to enter that career.


"Whatever decision the students make about their chosen career, they have been given an opportunity to reflect on what pathway they may want to pursue and hopefully clarify their options for their futures."


Displaying their presentations in the pictures below include Rose Wanjema (top picture) and Dylan Winger (bottom picture).

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Agriculture Programs Offer Students Hands-On Experiences

For many Fairview High School students, working with farm animals is all they know, having grown up on farms or working near farms on a daily basis. However, several other students don't have that first-hand experience outside of the school day. Fortunately, the Animal Sciences classes, which are offered as part of the regular agriculture curriculum, make a big impact for students wishing to learn these skills but without the opportunities at home.


"We want all of the kids to have the ability to meet content standards by having hands-on activities even if they don't have animals at home," stated Miss Jessica Nagel, vocational agriculture teacher. "To make this happen, we raised twenty meat chickens in the shop. That project focuses on different feeds and how they affect the production of meat on the birds."


Along with chickens, students also raise rabbits from near-birth. The state content standards for rabbits are very similar to those with chickens, just with a different set of variables.


"There are also two rabbits in the classrooms that allow the freshmen to have animals that they care for daily," added Nagel. "We have the ability to breed them to learn about livestock reproduction. The offspring can then be used as SAE (supervised agricultural experiences) projects."


SAE projects are done outside of class time and offer students experiences of their own interest. "These are projects where students get to choose what they want to learn," continued Nagel. Senior Anna Lechleidner, for example, was able to land a job placement at Family Farm and Home in Defiance as part of the SAE program.


Along with learning a great deal about farms, "This job has taught me a lot about budgeting and time management," stated Lechleidner. "I also get to make money doing something I enjoy," she said with a smile.


Another part of the experience with chickens involves "rate of gain" which measures how many pounds of feed are needed to get a chicken up to the desired eight pounds.


"We use different amounts of feed and test the weight of the chickens based on these amounts," said Nagel. "This is a good project for students to see how much food it takes to raise an animal."


Below, monitoring said weight of gain is sophomore Macy Driskill.

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Fairview Seventh Grader Takes Cross-Curricular Lesson To A New Level

One might say that Andy Mosier knows a thing or two about coding, as evidenced by a recent cross-curricular project done at Fairview Middle School.


Mosier, a seventh grader, combined lessons from English/language arts, computer literacy, and the middle school coding club to design and code The Mirror of Erised from Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone.


"The mirror tells you what your greatest desire is," said Mosier. "Students push a button on a remote, and text will appear."


In addition to this unique design, Andy has created many other objects from this popular story, each coded electronically to perform something different. For example, he has designed a Golden Snitch with flapping wings, a wand that lights up, the Marauder's map which displays footprints that light up, and the Hogwart's castle which lights up to the music of the Harry Potter theme song.


"Coding is mostly something I enjoy. I first started learning about it at the MakerFacturing STEM Camp at Northwest State (Community College in Archbold), and now I'm more advanced at making projects."


His teachers are certainly impressed too. "I was overwhelmed," exclaimed his ELA teacher, Miss Addie Batt, when describing Mosier's work. "Andy goes above and beyond. Every time we go to the library, Andy checks out a new book about coding. I always ask him 'What can you teach me?'"


"Andy is a self-teacher," stated computer literacy teacher, Mr. Ray Breininger. "This is his passion, and he has done a lot of self-learning."


Mosier is also eager to help his classmates learn. "He and another student have created games for other students to play," continued Breininger. "In the coding club, he is a reference for the other students to build what we are building in class."


From everyone at Fairview Middle School, great work Andy... and we look forward to many more projects on down the line.


Pictured below is Mosier proudly displaying The Mirror of Erised.

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Fourth Grade Students Combine Art, Math, and the Holiday Season

Christmas trees in all shapes, colors, and sizes: That's what the fourth grade students at Fairview Elementary School recently completed through two different projects that combined art and math.


Led by Mrs. Brooke Snyder and Mrs. Amy Eitniear, and through the generous help from many parents and community members, students created "hanger Christmas Trees" using coat hangers, several varieties of tinsel, and various adhesives to hold the trees together.


"Fabulous Fun by all!" exclaimed Mrs. Eitniear. "Thank you to all the parents who supplied materials for their student & sent extra "stuff" to share. It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas!"


The second activity, done in conjunction with Mrs. Kathy Holtsberry from the Sherwood Library, involved working with shapes and the concept of tessellation. This word is defined as "to cover (a plane surface) by repeated use of a single shape, without gaps or overlapping." The students were challenged with measuring their shapes so that each of them was identical as to avoid said gaps or overlapping.


Mrs. Holtsberry read the story Christmas Tree Tangle by Margaret Mahy, then each student decorated identical Christmas tree cutouts.


Said Mrs. Eitniear: "Students put all of their individual trees together to make a larger tree. and we talked about tessellation using the example of the tree."


Shown in the top picture below are fourth grade students with their hanger trees, while the bottom picture portrays the art of creating a Christmas tree through the use of tessellation.


Congratulations to everyone involved in this creative, cross-curricular lesson.

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Seventh Grade Students Experience Cross-Curricular Lesson

In an effort to bring symmetry to a the classroom, the Fairview seventh grade teachers outlined and introduced a cross-curricular lesson to the Fairview seventh grade students on the topic of ancient Greece, which is one of the learning standards for seventh grade social studies. For those not familiar with the term "cross-curricular lesson," this is a learning strategy used where multiple content areas center around one theme with the goal of presenting more meaningful and "real" lessons to the students.


in social studies class, students were introduced the topic of ancient Greece and participated in discussions with other students about how this culture has influenced many parts of the world for generations. To make this topic more meaningful and easier to understand, students in English/language arts class read myths and legends, including the novel Percy Jackson.


To bring math into the equation (no pun intended), students learned and applied their knowledge of fractions, ratios, and proportions by appropriately changing ingredients for a recipe of a popular Greek dish. Since Athens is well known for hosting the original modern Olympic Games, students in science class coded ping-pong-balled-sized apparatuses called Ozobots to compete in one of the following events: figure skating, slalom skiing, or curling. They then created games of their own with rules and coded the Ozobot to complete the game successfully.


In an attempt to bring imagery to the unit, students traveled to the Toledo Museum of Art to support their studies in art class. And to bring physical education components into the lesson, students competed in a scaled-down version of the Olympic Games.


The culminating activities included a dress-up day with a fashion show and a lunch buffet, which included a variety of unique Greek recipes.


"I would like to thank the seventh grade team for bringing content to life and providing experiences that students will never forget," said Mrs. Suzanne Geis, MS principal.


Shown in the top picture below is our seventh grade team of teachers responsible for crafting this creative unit: (left to right) Sarah Friess, Trisha Schlachter, Beth Bechtol, Nikki Grine, Brittany Yaichner, and Addie Batt. In the middle picture below, Cody Huffman is seen portraying a Greek god as part of the dress-up fashion show, while in the bottom picture below, students take the starting line to participate in one of the many Olympic events.

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Foreign Language Department Gears Up For Overseas Trip

Note: This is part three of a three-part series highlighting the Foreign Language Department


An overseas trip, hurricane relief, a reading challenge, and more highlight the third part of the three-part series showcasing the continued activities of the Fairview Foreign Language Department.


Hurricane Relief


Following the devastating hurricane in Puerto Rico, several students stepped up and led in-class lessons centering on problem-solving and activism. Through their efforts, students were able to raise over $1,000 in aid, which was sent during the 2017-2018 school year. This money was used in a variety of ways including to help build a new preschool.


Ambassador Leadership Summits


To help promote achievement and leadership, the department has recognized twenty-five high-achieving foreign language students this school year with nominations for the Leadership Summit for Ambassador Leadership Summits, held at Yale University, Johns Hopkins University, UCLA, and Harvard Law School.


Says Mrs. Jacqueline Davis, Spanish teacher and department advisor: "The goal of this program is to unlock leadership potential and build confidence, expand global awareness and learn how they (nominated students) can make a difference in their community, and gain a competitive edge for college admissions."


Reading Challenge


To build skills in reading and word recognition, four students recently finished at least eight books each (written in Spanish). Following the completion of the books, the group got together over snacks and Scrabble to discuss various themes.


Library Collaboration


With the help of Mrs. Sally Miller, Fairview MS/HS librarian, and Mrs. Kathy Holtsberry, Sherwood Public Librarian, our local libraries have made a conscientious effort to expand their offerings to students by providing additional books and materials written in foreign languages.


American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL)


With the overall goal of matching individual students with their foreign language needs and goals, students recently took part in a student survey from ACTFL. As part of the process, students received College Scholarship Match Reports.


Paris 2020


Finally, the biggest news of all may be a trip to Paris scheduled for 2020, with plans and fundraising activities currently in motion to help supplement the costs of the trip. A Yankee Candle Sale is set to open in January 2019 (with the school receiving 40% of the sales), while a Royal Tea fundraising event was held in October with several people in attendance. The Royal Tea featured an array of flavors for sampling, a guest speaker who spoke of a recent trip to England, and Miss Kari Rosani on the bagpipes.


"Thank you to the village of Sherwood and Sherri Ramey for allowing us to use the Crystal Fountain Auditorium for our fundraiser," stated Mrs. Davis.


For enrollment information about this exciting opportunity, visit www.eftours.com/2096726ex.


For anyone wishing for more detailed information about the trip to Paris or for answers to any general questions about the Fairivew Foreign Language Deparrtment, interested persons should contact Mrs. Davis at the school. And remember to follow the department on Twitter @FairviewFLDept to stay current on in-class activities, extensions, college foreign language programs, study abroad programs, international current events, and opportunities for future foreign language careers and activism.


Shown below is senior Trevor McMahon offering information about all the Foreign Language Department has to offer students at Fairview High School.

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Fairview Teachers Team Up With Central Shares

Central Shares, a charitable organization in the Central Local School District, seeks to provide needed essentials to members of the community. To help with this effort, the Teachers Association of Central Local Schools (TACLS) has teamed up with Central Shares by coordinating a food drive.


The event kicked off at the last home football game on October 26. Several teachers braved the unfavorable weather that evening by tailgating and "stuffing the trailer" outside the ticket area.


"This was a great example of how our teachers can come together and be unified in helping our community," says Jill Speiser, family & consumer science teacher.


The food drive will continue through the holidays, so community members interested in contributing to this cause may do so by dropping off items in the elementary school atrium.


Shown in the picture below are several teachers who were present at the football game on October 26.

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Sixth Graders Introduced to the STEAM Experience

STEAM is coming from all directions in the Maker Space room at Fairview Middle School as Mrs. Sarah Schaper introduces several new concepts to this year's sixth grade students. STEAM, an acronym for science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics, is in full swing this year.


"In my first year teaching STEAM, I have tried to involve outside help from the community in teaching the students new things, especially involving technology," says Schaper. "I contacted Chris Malanga from NWOCA, and he came for four days to present to the kids about LEGO Mindstorm."


Evidence strongly suggests that hands-on lessons are most effective, especially in the world of science, and LEGO is a great tool to motivate students.


"They enjoyed building the LEGO robot and creating the programs to make their robot move," continues Schaper. "I am hoping to encourage the students to investigate their interests in various projects that involve engineering and computer programming."


Getting both boys and girls excited about STEAM is critical, as these areas of study have been dominated for years by men. But clearly, both boys and girls alike were equally excited to participate in the LEGO project.


"Many were very excited about tackling this project!" exclaimed Schaper with excitement.


Shown in the picture below facilitating a class of sixth graders hard at work is Mr. Malanga from Northwest Ohio Computer Association (NWOCA).

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Fairview Foreign Language Department Continues Making Program Advancements

Note: This is part two of a three-part series highlighting the Foreign Language Department


From designing a website, to offering advanced curricular options, to welcoming a student teacher to the building, the Fairview High School Foreign Language Department continues making tremendous advancements in just a short time period of time.


“We are so thankful for administrative and community support as we have been working hard to revive and build our foreign language department," indicates Spanish teacher Mrs. Jacqueline Davis. "By making long-term improvements, we show our students how important their foreign language education can be. That directly effects their immediate futures, college experiences, and career options.”


The new FL Dept. website features a variety of Spanish class resources, foreign language resources, extension activities, community shout out's, and event photos. Visitors to the website (which can be accessed on the Central Local web-site or found on Twitter @FairviewFLDept), will find a list of reasons for studying a second language, a list of positive effects of a full foreign language education, and other statistics and advantages of being able to speak more than one language.


"If we want long-term foreign language education success, we need information to be accessible to students and families," continues Mrs. Davis. "Our website is a way to help connect students to their current language interests, and long-term language goals. We want to thank our tech director, Mr. Adam Singer, for his continual help updating our site and announcements."


Having the necessary curricular tools is a vital part of learning a new language. Fortunately, students have been introduced to new textbooks that align with AP Prep, and a recent Central Local Mini-Grant has paved the way for a new set of authentic text novels. Just this October, Davis applied for an additional grant through the Ohio Foreign Language Association to continue building classroom resources, while students are applying the school-wide E+R=O initiative in Spanish.


"Community collaboration has been vital as we continue updating our curricular materials to national standards, while still incorporating our community’s values. We thank our Board of Education for the purchase of our new text books; The Fairview Mini-Grant Committee for our new Spanish II authentic novels; and the Fairview High School Library and Sherwood Community Library for their collaboration and new multi-cultural young adult literature. These advancements are designed to fuel literacy, multiculturalism, bilingualism, and most importantly, student engagement. The more we build an environment that embraces foreign language, the more likely our students are to become bilingual in their lives and careers."


As a final piece of excitement, Mrs. Davis is pleased to note that she will have the opportunity to mentor a student teacher for the first time this year.


“We are so excited to have Mr. Andrew Dennis with us this year from Bowling Green State University. He responds very well to the kids and has a heart for linguistics. We are really looking forward to his student teaching in the spring.”


Congratulations to Mrs. Davis and the foreign language department for its continued advancements.


Shown in the picture below are Spanish I students enjoying authentic foods they prepared and presented for Mexican celebration Day of the Dead.

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FCCLA Continues to Give Back to the Community

The Fairview FCCLA (Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America), under the direction of Mrs. Jill Speiser, continues to make a positive difference in many facets of the community by providing an array of services.


"We are a group that loves to get together and do things!" exclaims Speiser with a big smile on her face. "It could be for a community service project, for leadership in the chapter, or for a competitive project."


From cleaning up the roads to bringing joy to the elderly, students are willing to step up to make a difference.


"We started off the year with several different activities such as participating in different county fair activities and picking up trash for the Adopt a Roadway program. We've also decorated pumpkins and delivered them to the nursing home."


The FCCLA students are constantly seeking additional training and learning new ways to help others.


Says Speiser, "We went to Pioneer Career Center (Shelby, OH) for a Chapter Officer Training. From there we went to Camp Palmer for our Fall District Rally." Speiser notes that these events are designed for students to work with other students to develop leadership and service skills, all while making friends from other school districts.


Several future events are also in the planning stages, according to Speiser.


"This year, Fairview has three District Officers that get to plan and run the District Rallies. In the near future we plan to visit the Fort Defiance Humane Society, go caroling at nursing homes, have a Thanksgiving Potluck, and start working on our competitive projects that get judged in early March."


For more information about this motivated group of young people, contact Mrs. Speiser at Fairview HS.


Shown in the picture below are several members of this year's club taking a short break from picking up trash along Coy Road.

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Fairview Foreign Language Department -- Organized, Energized, and Active

Note: This is part one of a three-part series highlighting the Foreign Language Department.


The Fairview Foreign Language Club, under the direction of Mrs. Jacqueline Davis, is setting a very high bar for activity. Designed to bring a greater understanding of cultures from other parts of the world, the department aims to immerse its members in a variety of activities.


“Our activities are an opportunity for students to explore various aspects of cultures they may not see or experience in Northwest Ohio," states Davis. "While the activities are entertaining, the goal is to educate and empower students to be global-minded. We want to be well-informed, to appreciate diversity, and to make the world a better place.”


Organized with officers, members elected the following students for the 2018-2019 school year: Alena Gallindo, president; Adrianna Roth, vice president; Natalie Marshall, secretary, Alayna Willitzer, treasurer, and Jalee Elson, Trevor McMahon, & Josiah Adkins, student ambassadors. Davis believes these young people are an integral part of the club and states, "Our officers for 2018-2019 have shown tremendous leadership in the last year. Because this is only our second year in operation, their vision for student-led activities has defined our diverse expectation for learning. Each of them represents and demonstrates the global-minded values we hope to instill throughout the year."


Monthly meetings are held at least one time per month. Each meeting is designed to highlight one particular country’s language, customs, and food. Recently, the club heard from current students Kaleigh and Alexis Hart about their travels to Europe.


Continues Davis, "In the last month, students have been excited to hear Kaleigh and Alexis share about their recent trip to ten European countries."


In addition, "We learned the Japanese alphabet and completed our first fundraiser. Next month, we are looking forward to learning about the country of Greece, visiting a Greek restaurant, and talking to a nurse who recently returned from working there."


The club got off to a roaring start a year ago with several educational excursions, including trips to Bowling Green for Middle Eastern and Irish food; to Bowling Green State University for a Caribbean concert; to The Valentine Theater in Toledo for the Italian Opera “Rigoletto”; and to Valparaiso University to explore their multicultural and foreign language programs and authentic Spanish food. Additionally, several former and current students have come to meetings to speak to the students, including Austin Rucker, who spoke about his life and experiences Germany; Chris Yagel, who spoke about his life in Japan, and the Hart sisters (noted above), who discussed their summer trip to Europe.


Also, in a collaborative effort between student ambassador Jalee Elson and cafeteria director Chris Bok, students were afforded the opportunity to try different foods from around the world during Foreign Language Learning Week held in March of 2018. "This school-wide event was the first of its kind, and also offered a trivia competition, school-wide décor, themed dress-up days, and a fundraiser," says Davis.


Not to be outdone, this year's planned events include visits to Carmen the Opera, the International Festival at Valparaiso University, Oktoberfest with BGSU’s German club, a sushi party, international Christmas caroling, and an International Dinner hosted by the Sherwood Pizza & Subs.


"So many of our activities are student-led and involve community collaboration; the kids tell me what they are interested in exploring, and we make that happen. We try to find as many local events and activities where culture, diversity, and language are highlighted. I love watching students follow their curiosity to try new experiences for the first time; that’s a life skill."


Finally, another group of twenty students interested in Japanese language, food, culture and travel, affectionately known as the Japanese Crew, have been meeting monthly as a Foreign Language Club extension.


"We were surprised by how many students have been interested in learning about Japanese language, food, and experiences. We have been so blessed to have new student Chris Yagel here to spark our interest, teach us the alphabet, and share his culture with us. In addition, Mrs. Miller in the library has introduced us to a vast wealth of Japanese resources on Japanese cooking, history, culture, and customs. We are hoping to have our first sushi-making party before Christmas."


You can follow the Foreign Language Club and the Foreign Language Department on Twitter @FairviewFLDept.


In the picture below, Mrs. Davis (second row, center) is flanked by this year's members of the Fairview HS Foreign Language Club.

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Motion Created Through Many Forms of Energy

What makes an object move? Why does it move as far as it does? What causes it to slow down and/or change directions? These questions and more are being answered in Mrs. Tonya Kelly's classroom as her students are learning all about motion and the forces needed to make objects move.


As part of this lesson, students created balloon-powered "race cars" with the goal of making them travel distances as a result of air being extracted from a balloon.


"They (the students) researched Newton's Third Law of Motion," said Kelly. "They adjusted the mass and weight and came up with just the right amount of force."


Most people have probably learned Newton's Laws at some point in their lives, but as a quick refresher, Newton's Third Law is best known in the terms of "For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction." When air leaves the balloon, this force causes the car to move.


Like many experiments, the results varied. However, students were excited to see that their continued trials and tribulations led the cars to move the desired distance.


In fact, "In one trial run, the car traveled ten feet," stated Kelly.


Shown in the top picture are Allison Rhodes, Nolan Polito, Lester Smith, and Michael Mansel-Pleydell showing off their model and providing details to the class. In the bottom picture, Rhodes is prepared to release the air to see Newton's Third Law in action.

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Fairview Middle School Earns Momentum Award for Second Consecutive Year

Student growth and academic achievement continue to be at the forefront in the halls of Fairview Middle School, as for second consecutive year, FMS has earned the Momentum Award from the Ohio Department of Education. Based on academic progress, schools that show continued growth in the areas of "Achievement," "Progress," and "Gap Closing" are the recipients of this prestigious designation.


This award is the result of many factors, most notably the buy-in of the staff members to find creative means to reach a variety of learning styles.


"The teachers are continuously working to find ways to meet individual student needs so all students are successful," says Mrs. Suzanne Geis, building principal. "They are relentless. These teachers are taking ownership of student success."


Geis believes her staff has adapted to the changes coming in the world of education.


"Our teachers have students' complete learning style surveys and interest surveys so lessons can be designed to align with those interests and needs, which leads to deeper engagements and learning."


On behalf of Central Local Board of Education, we send many congratulations to all Fairview staff members, students, and parents who made this award possible.


Shown accepting the award at the recent Northwest Ohio School Boards Association fall banquet are (second from left) Mrs. Beth Bechtol, Mrs. Suzanne Geis, Ms. Addie Batt, and Mrs. Beverly Singer. They are flanked by OSBA president Randy Smith (far left) and NWOSBA president Penny Kill (far right).

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Miss Friess Uses Art to Open Doors with Students

Attention all artists: The east wing hallway of Fairview Middle School is currently an art lover's paradise as Miss Sarah Friess' sixth grade art class students have adorned the walls with non other than self portraits in the form of Lego characters.


"The premise of this particular project is to get to know my new 6th grade students through their self portraits as Lego characters," says Friess. "They are asked to add at least five things about themselves in their drawing. Those five things should help their friends and classmates recognize them."


Drawing oneself is never easy, especially for young people, but this lesson helps to alleviate some of the hurdles that students face when asked to draw a picture of themselves.


Says Friess, "If you ask most students to draw themselves, they have a tendency to shut down because 'That’s too hard!' or 'I don’t know how to draw a face!' When you ask kids to draw something like a Lego person to look like them, they can process that differently and are far less intimidated by the idea.


"I start each quarter with a new batch of 6th graders and love doing this project!"


To help illustrate the idea, Friess created a Lego character of herself (second picture below) and states "the kids really look forward to making their own."


Over the years, Friess has attempted to create a culture where kids look forward to going to art class.


"It’s a wonderful feeling as a teacher… knowing the kids are excited to get to your class and start making art. The best part to my job is creating an environment of trust and respect where kids feel free to do their best without judgment or ridicule."


Among the many fine pieces of artwork currently displayed is the Lego self portrait created by Natalie Timbrook (seen in the picture below). Great job to Natalie and the sixth grade art class students.

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Mrs. Woodring Introduces Ecosystems

When you walk through Mrs. Amy Woodring's classroom door, one of the first sights you are sure to notice are the beautiful colors on the other side of the room. Lots of green, orange, white, and pink to name a few. No, her students aren't studying the colors of the rainbow, but rather they are being introduced to the world of ecosystems.


As part of this hands-on lesson, students designed their own ecosystems with use of a variety of products, most notably two-liter bottles, stones, dirt, plants, water, and live creatures such as snails and fish.


"The Biology classes have been learning about ecosystems and the biotic and abiotic factors in them," says Woodring. " As part of this unit, I had the students research different types of ecosystems that could be constructed out of a 2-liter bottle. They could choose an aquatic or terrestrial system."


Students were put in groups with each student having an equal part in the projects. Using the bottle as the living environment, most groups chose to cut out part of the top and begin adding contents. As seen in the pictures below, many went with water (aquatic), while others chose dirt (terrestrial).


"They (the students) had to make a list of materials they needed and a procedure to follow to construct the ecosystem. Students brought in most of the items used during construction."


The overall goal of this lesson was to teach students that for life to survive, the right environment must exist, including adequate oxygen and food. In the absence of one or the other, the organisms were not going to make it long.


"Some of the fish didn't make it through the weekend, but the snails all appear to be doing fine," noted Woodring earlier this week. "The water has to be just right for the fish to survive, and the students are learning how to make that happen."


Shown in the pictures are several examples of the finished products.

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Central Local Celebrates Years of Service to the District

To help celebrate years of service to Central Local Schools, staff members posed for group pictures at this year's opening day staff meeting.


Staff members with 30-plus years include (left to right) Mary Ann Steffel, Susan Kozumplik, Diane Stover, Dave Miller, Lisa Vance, and Tara Czartoski.

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Staff members with 26-29 years of service to the district include (left to right) Staci Renollet, Steve Rohrs, and Lisa Nusbaum.
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Staff members with 21-25 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Beth Bechtol, Stacy Nadler, Denae Roose, Denise Pannell, Sandy Heighland, Kari Rosania, and Jenny Johnson; and in the back row (left to right) Diane Meyer, Lauren Beck, Kelly Dempsey, Anne Frank, Cheryl Harding, Addie Batt, and Kevin Sims.
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Staff members with 16-20 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Kim Beek, Joni Culler, Molly Hauer, Amy Eitniear, Nikki Grine, Tracy Robinson, Lori Polter, and Beverly Singer; and in the back row (left to right) Jake Panico, Vicky Moore (with Ralph), Adam Brickner, Curt Foust, Ray Breininger, Brooke Snyder, Jess Hotmire, Katrina Tonneas, and Andy Singer.
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Staff members with 11-15 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Amanda Troyer, Jill Speiser, Vickie Crites, Lisa Ford, Amy Woodring, and Kelly Panico; and in the back row (left to right) Trisha Schlachter, Terri Cooper, Sheryl Short, and Sarah Friess.
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Staff members with 6-10 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Nancy Scantlen, Chelsey Hartz, Tonya Kelly, Lauren Hurtig, Annie Zipfel, Courtney Cobb, Emily Willitzer, Megan Gearhart, Julee Bayliss, and Brittany Yaichner; and in the back row (left to right) Jessie Timbrook, Adam Singer, Doug Rakes, Nic Alvarez, Taryn Monroe, Jessie Sliwinski, Jason Wermer, Eric Drummelsmith, and Kurt Nusbaum.
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Staff members with 1-5 years of service to the district include (front row - left to right) Amy Dunlap and Nicole Carone; in the middle row (left to right) Sherrie Brown, Jessica Nagel, Kim Dockery, Janie Laukhauf, Sally Miller, Ginny Pettenger, Lindsay Imm, Jacqueline Davis, Suzanne Geis, and Maggie Schneider; and in the back row (left to right) Josh Neilson, Brady Ruffer, Kerry Samples, Meagan Taylor, Tim Breyman, Laura Renollet, Alison Ciolek, Joe Kime, Scott Hall, Bodi Kaufman, and Jason Pelz.
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Staff members new to the district this year include (front row - left to right) Kari Myers, Kristi Schooley, Jami Speiser, Cara Drummelsmith, Shanna Collins, and Joanna Harmon; and in the back row (left to right) Kelly Hug, Laura Brady, Andrew McMaster, Derek Smalley, Nick Karayianopoulos, and John Echelbarger.
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The "Middle School Mission" At Work

Fairview Middle School faculty and staff understand that the middle school years can be a tough time of transition and self-doubt. The staff also understands the high academic demands coming from the state of Ohio and the tremendous importance of building a strong educational foundation. Fortunately, those who work daily with children this age also understand the necessity for meeting the needs of the whole child. As a result, Mrs. Geis has built time into this year's weekly schedule for special group activities and R Factor disciplines, all which lead to the overarching "Middle School Mission."


"Life happens," says Principal Geis. "A variety of events will take place throughout our day. We cannot control the events, but we can control how we respond to each event in an effort to creating a positive outcome."


The outcome Geis refers to is the R Factor. "Learning how to manage our R can be the difference between a successful outcome and a frustrating, angry or negative consequence."


Fairview Middle School also stresses the "above the line" responses and behaviors. Students are learning how to make choices with intention, while learning that actions and words are choices that lead to outcomes.


To enhance this growing program, students leaders have been chosen and/or have volunteered to lead monthly focus groups with the guidance of a teachers.


"Each group of student leaders plans activities for the student body promoting and modeling the particular focused R Factor discipliine," continued Geis. "The goal is to provide opportunities for students to put the disciplines into practice."


All students have also been divided into different teams with mixed grade levels to participate in activities promoting cooperation and recognition of each other's strengths. The main goal of the program is to provide opportunities for students to make positive connections with students in other grade levels and with the adults in the building in an effort to create a more inclusive and supportive school environment where all students can flourish.


In addition to R Factor push, MS teachers are offering special club-type activities every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon for students in each grade level. Examples of the clubs, which will change each quarter, include the following: drama, photography, current events, walking, chess, arts & crafts, coloring, math, science, Cricut crafts, helping others, and book club.


"The R Factor disciplines and student activities all support our middle school mission which is to develop and foster social awareness in an effort to continuously promote a positive learning culture conducive to maximizing each student's individual potential in becoming the best version of themselves.," summarizes Geis.


For more information about this ground-breaking program, interested individuals should contact the middle school office.


Seen in the top picture below is Miss Addie Batt supervising the chess club. Underneath, Mr. Nick Karayianopoulos demonstrates a scene for the drama club.

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Computer Literacy Class -- How Pixels Affect Our Lives

Students in Mr. Ray Breininger's computer literacy class are doing their best to keep up with the fast-paced changes in today's ever-advancing world of technology. Among many projects planned for this year, students are currently experiencing the complex world of coding. What is coding, you might ask?


"Coding is another term for computer programming," says Breininger. "The eighth grade computer literacy students are participating in a project-based, stem coding class with a circuitry prototyping component."


Students recently completed a nine pixel animation machine. Despite students' love for technology, many did not know until this lesson how pixels (short for picture elements) affected their everyday lives.


"This lesson focused on the fact that students use monitors everyday on their phones, computers, tablets, and TV's," continued Breininger. "Students learned that the displays on most present-day monitors are composed of millions of pixels, which are tiny points that the computer can light up in different colors."


Although most people take for granted just how incredible today's technology is, students are always eager to understand why their devices are capable of doing what they do.


Students learned that "all these pixels together make up the text, images , and videos" they read and see on their screens everyday.


After building a simple monitor using LED's, students learned how to use custom functions using the Arduino platform to code a simple message like "help."


A variety of supplies, both simple and complex, are needed to complete the monitors. Students used practical, everyday materials like hot glue and cardboard to build their enclosure constructions: yet for the electronic part of their projects, they used more advanced products found in a Sparkfun Inventor kit. The main component of the Sparkfun Inventor kit is the Arduino Red board micro-controller.


Learning these skills in the middle school are prerequisites for being successful in certain high school classes. Says Breininger: "The use of the Arduino micro-controller prepares students for the necessary coding background required by the high school engineering course."


We wish our students ongoing success as our teachers continue challenging them with relevant, modern lessons each day.


Seen in the top picture below is Tatum Sheets demonstrating his working nine pixel animation machine. In the bottom picture, Carrie Zeedyk uses a template to cut out her enclosure construction for the nine pixel animation machine.

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Emotional Support Dog Helps In Many Ways

Ralph, a five-year-old tri-colored beagle, is an Emotional Support Dog who comes to Fairview Elementary School each Friday with his owner, Mrs. Vicky Moore. Mrs. Moore is the Title I teacher for kindergarten and grade 3. She also provides needed support for students in grades 4 and 5.


Says Mrs. Moore: "The children love Ralph, and Ralph loves the children. Fridays are testing and progress days, and Ralph is able to provide a calming environment for students during these assessments. In addition, Ralph gives us all comfort and support."


Ralph (with some assistance from Mrs. Moore) reads to classrooms full of children at special times during the year. At each of these events, he shares ten messages and asks the students to make a promise to work on these messages: BE...

R - responsible and respectful

A - attentive and amicable

L - likable and a good listener

P - patient and proud

H - honest and helpful


Here are a few statements from teachers at Fairview Elementary School:


"Ralph is patient, loving, huggable, well-behaved, and has the best ears ever!"

"You put a smile on our faces and make us look forward to Fridays."

"You brighten my day, and you're so good with the kids at FVE."

"You bring happiness to all who see you."


Many thanks go out to Mrs. Moore and Ralph for making a positive difference for the students at Fairview Elementary School.


Shown in the photo below is Ralph welcoming a new student to the our district.

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Fairview Freshman Authors Novel

Everyone wants his or her high school years to be memorable, and for Andrea Macsay, she has gotten off to a great start. At just fourteen years old, Andrea has published her first book, Moonglade, which she began writing and editing one year ago.


"Writing is just really revolutionary, and the variety of words can change the hardest of hearts," says Andrea. "The beauty of words can paint a whole new picture of something so simple."


Moonglade is an adventure featuring characters Bella and Jack who just want a normal get-away vacation with the goal of putting their stress behind them. Trouble, however, soon begins when their plane experiences mechanical issues and falls from the sky. As they plummet to Earth, they wish only to survive.


Meanwhile, back in Jack and Bella's home state, an unloved little boy named Jeremiah seeks some worth in this world. Under the power of his foster parents, who hate anything and everything, including Jeremiah, they throw him outside to live among pigs and force him to adapt to an unhealthy sleeping schedule. One day after the news exploded of the plane crash, Jeremiah has the brilliant idea to join the search party. And thus the story begins.


"The movie Castaway really inspired me to create this story based on the many ways an author can make a story come to life. There are many troubles that the characters go through, and I feel that them pushing through them is very encouraging to many people."


The school library currently has two signed copies of Andrea's book, so to learn how this exciting plot twists and turns, be sure to borrow a copy soon.


From everyone at Fairview High School, we offer Andrea Macsay (shown below holding her book) many congratulations and wish her much success as she continues her writing in the future.

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Real-Life Science Experiment with Mrs. Schlachter

As a veteran science teacher, Mrs. Trisha Schlachter knows a thing or two about science experiments. But she experienced a "first" on opening day this school year.


While presenting new information to her ambitious students, a cracked tooth suddenly fell out of her mouth. Seizing the opportunity to make the event a teachable moment, she showed the students how to quickly and correctly bag up the tooth so that it would remain in good order for the balance of day. With the safety of her tooth in check and her students having learned a valuable lesson, she went about the rest of the day finishing her classes.


The next day she arrived with a new tooth, but this group of seventh graders may always remember their first day of school.


Thanks, Mrs. Schlachter, for presenting a real-life experiment on opening day.


Seen in the picture below with Mrs. Schlachter are students Aubryn Viers and Nevada Vogelsong examining the damaged tooth.

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Welcome Back Students

Opening day at school is always a special time for students, especially for youngsters returning to the elementary school.


In the picture below, Mrs. Brown receives a hug from one of her students, while Ms. Myers, our new school counselor, helps to welcome a group of young people back from summer vacation.


Excitement runs high at all three Fairview buildings as we anticipate another great school year.

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Orientation for New Students at Fairview High School

In what has become an annual tradition, Fairview High School began the 2018-19 school year with its "Freshman/New Student Orientation Day." Started in 2016, the primary objective for this day is for the Fairview HS faculty and staff to help incoming freshmen and other students new to the district become acclimated to a new building, to a new schedule of classes, and to a new group of teachers.


The morning hours were spent with students spending time in each class on their schedule in order to learn their way around the building and to be introduced to each teacher. Following the morning session, several teachers prepared and served lunch to all students, which included the Yummy Yunker French Fries. Following lunch, students gathered in groups to spend the afternoon participating in team building competitions.


"It was great to welcome new faces to the high school. Teachers worked very hard to introduce the students to the high school and make them feel comfortable," said Mr. Breyman, HS principal.


"Special thanks to our staff that worked tirelessly in planning over the summer. The day was fun for all."


Shown in the top picture below are Mr. Yunker, Mr. Rakes, and Mr. Kauffman preparing the fries. Shown in bottom picture is Mr. Breyman interacting with a group of students during lunch.


From everyone at Fairview HS, we'd like to send out a big Apache welcome to our freshman and all new students.

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One of area's nicest baseball facilities a result of years of fund-raising

Area baseball players, coaches, and fans know these facts to be true about Fairview High School baseball: rich tradition, multiple championships, and outstanding facilities. Many great players, coaches, and families have aided in these accolades, but among the most dedicated of them all is current head baseball coach Andy Singer, who has been instrumental in making the baseball field among the nicest in this part of Ohio.


"The facility upgrades are done so that our players can have a facility that they can be proud of and that they feel like they are appreciated for their efforts," said Singer. "The coaching staff, parents, players, and community members have all been part of all the facility upgrades over the past sixteen years."


In the past decade and a half , the facility has undergone extensive improvements, all done through the efforts of an on-going, private fund-raising campaign spearheaded by Singer, along with many tireless volunteers. He is quick to give credit to everyone who has helped.


"The best thing about this is that it can't be one person that makes this happen. Our district is blessed to have dedicated coaches, dedicated parents, dedicated players, and a wonderful community that will step up when we can provide our players with something they can be proud of."


The largest overhaul occured in 2007 with the addition of new dugouts, a concession stand, a press box, a brick backstop, backstop netting, a concrete seating area, a re-crowned and re-seeded infield, an irrigation system, and wooden benches in both dugouts. Since then, the backstop netting was replaced (2010), a state-of-the-art scoreboard was erected (2012), for-ever-green ivy was installed on the outfield fence (2013), infield turf was laid (2017), and a much-needed storage building was constructed (2018)... all done with money raised privately.


Says Singer, "Those funds come from many man hours of work running the 4th, 5th and 6th grade girls basketball tournament; an Acme round robin tournament; a Jr. Acme round robin tournament; the Jr. Acme regional tournament; 127 garage sale concessions; concessions at all games played on the field; the fall tailgate supper and sausage sale; and then with the help of the Ney Area JC's and our annual Designer Purse Reverse.


"Our most recent addition was the storage building that replaced the two resin buildings that were previously in the same spot. Those buildings were 12 x 12 and due to weathering were falling apart and not adequately keeping our equipment/supplies dry and clean. This new storage building will allow for plenty of storage for our future needs both equipment/supplies/concessions."


According to Singer, several area teams reach out to Fairview to play games here.


"With all of the renovations that have taken place, we find that many coaches from other schools enjoy coming to Fairview to allow their athletes the chance to play at a facility like ours."


Singer and his staff focus on fund-raisers that unite the community and teach his players valuable life lessons: "All of our fundraisers are events that bring the community together to support our student-athletes and enjoy fellowship time together. When our players work at these events, they are also learning the valuable lesson of working hard and serving the public in a polite and respectful manner."


Working this year's concession stand at the annual 127 Yard Sales include (below, left to right) Terri Cooper, Andy Singer, Anthony Singer, Dave Cooper, Tony Singer, and Beverly Singer.

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Kristi Schooley set to begin new career as a teacher; Laura Brady joins central office staff

As the 2018-2019 school year quickly approaches, more changes are happening with the central office staff. Not only does our school district have a new superintendent, but we will soon have a new administrative assistant to the superintendent as well.


After four years of serving in this capacity, Ms. Kristi Schooley is set to trade in her daily clerical duties and begin a new chapter of her life as she becomes the Fairview High School business teacher in August.


"I've always wanted to be a teacher, but coming out of high school I was undecided about a career path," stated Schooley. "I had taken accounting and other business classes in high school and ended up deciding to pursue an accounting career. After getting an accounting degree, I ended up being a stay-at-home mom for several years.


"When I decided to re-enter the workforce, I first worked as a substitute teacher, which led to working in the school system. Eventually, the position I'm leaving became available, and I was selected for this job.


"I have really enjoyed this job, but I've missed the interaction with students. Then when the opportunity came to apply for the business teaching position, I believed the timing was right for me. I applied for the teaching job and was blessed to be chosen."


Schooley, a mother of three Fairview students, admits there will be facets of her old job that she will miss. "I will miss the daily contact with my fellow office workers and the frequent interaction I have with the community."


Yet the excitement of working with students is something she is very much looking forward to as the new school year approaches. "I have been preparing for opening day with the students for several weeks now and can't wait to introduce my first lesson to my students."


Although new superintendent, Mr. Steve Arnold, has worked with Schooley for just a short while, she has made a great impression. "Kristi has taught me so much about the Central Local School District since I arrived in early June. Her knowledge and experience will be missed, although I wish her much success as she ventures into a new chapter of her life," stated Arnold.


Replacing Ms. Schooley in the central office will be Mrs. Laura Brady. A Fairview alumnae and mother of four former/current Fairview students, Brady comes to Central Local Schools having most recently worked for Williams County Job and Family Services in a similar role.


"In my previous job with Williams County, I served as the HR Officer for JFS. Among my many duties, I was actively involved in the hiring process, the orientation of new employees, payroll and benefits, and the behind-the-scenes business operations," said Brady.


Brady is currently spending a few days working side-by-side with Schooley learning as much as she can before taking over on her own.


"I definitely have an appreciation for everything that Kristi does in this office. In just a few days, we have covered a lot of different duties and responsibilities, and hopefully everyone will be patient as I try to learn this job."


Brady is not hiding her excitement as the days crawl closer to the start of this coming school year.


"I'm looking forward to learning the business end of a school system and getting to know the employees and students at Fairview. I'm just so excited to get started."


Says Arnold: "Laura brings a great deal of experience with her. I look for the transition to be very smooth."


We wish both Ms. Schooley (left in picture below)) and Mrs. Brady well in their new positions.

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"Who's Telling Your Story?" makes its debut with a feature on the Central Local Maintenance Crew

Welcome to the new "Who's Telling Your Story?" website link, where employees of the Central Local School District will have the opportunity to promote the many awesome events happening on a daily basis in their classrooms, departments, offices, etc.



As we start to role through the month of July, our maintenance staff is busily preparing the buildings for the 2018-2019 school year. Along with cleaning, painting, and waxing, the crew will spend countless hours during the upcoming summer weeks covering all bases to assure that Fairview MS/HS and Fairview Elementary School both shine with pride on opening day.


Says Phil Hetrick, head of maintenance and transportation, "The facilities are coming together nicely, The fresh look of new paint at both buildings along with a several revamped floors will be sure to give off a great first impression of the buildings. Our courteous, professional crew does a great job all year long.


"We're also very excited for the community to see the great new shine on the gym floors this upcoming fall. Hope to see you all at this year's extra-curricular events."


Our maintenance staff plays an ultra-important role in the daily success of our great district, and we'd like thank them for all they do.


Appearing on the recently refurbished high school gym floor are several members of the maintenance staff: (left to right) Joe Meyer, Steve Rohrs, Nick Rennollet, Phil Hetrick, and Jason Wermer. Missing from the photo are crew members Scott Heighland, Myra Wolfrum, and Tab Smith.

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"Who's Telling Your Story?" features the Central Local Technology Department

Students love using computers, and we love having our students use them. But before these wonderful educational tools can go into the hands of our students, a tremendous amount of work happens in the summer months to assure our staff, students, and parents that our students will be able to use them well and for appropriate purposes.


"It's been a busy summer here at Fairview when it comes to technology projects," says Adam Singer, director of technology. "We are managing a few extra projects this summer to ramp up our district's security that include deploying a new network-based PA system district-wide and deploying new network based classroom phones district-wide. These systems are integrated together to provide push button emergency lock down capabilities from any of the district's phones to help keep our students safe."


Other recent projects include migrating our eighteen virtualized servers to new hardware and the latest server operating systems; improving our disaster recovery system; deploying a new district wide network-based security camera system; deploying new, more efficient multi-function printers district-wide with PaperCut management which helps us cut printing costs and increases usability; rolling out BitLocker Encryption for all staff devices to keep our data safe; upgrading our elementary wireless network this summer to match the capacity of our high school and middle school wireless which support our Chromebook 1:1 program; doubling the amount of Chromebook carts at the elementary this summer to give our elementary students more access to technology; and lots and lots of new cabling to support all of our new network-based projects. The technology staff has found that just about any new project is possible, even in an older building, when you know how to find the right companies. Even with odd projects like putting in a new PA system, we still were able to find four companies that perform turn-key solutions to compete to get the best solution that fits our needs for the best price.


In addition, we would like to welcome our newest member of the technology team, John Echelbarger, to Central Local Schools. Mr. Echelbarger replaces Austin Bard, who recently accepted a position of director of technology for the Millcreek-West Unity Schools. Together, Mr. Singer and Mr. Echelbarger will help to continue the 21st Century education needed to succeed in today's ever-changing world.


"We are very fortunate to have such an excellent team," continued Singer, "from our maintenance crew who are working with us day-by-day to make this district an even better place for our students, to our quick and organized Superintendent and Treasury department who can let us know what is possible and who have the expertise to answer any tough questions that we have along the way. This summer while I, Mr. Singer, am busy managing summer projects and working on streamlining the management of our now 1300+ Chromebook, laptop, and desktop inventory, Mr. Echelbarger is busy repairing Chromebooks, developing on-demand technology training, installing Smartboards, prepping new Chromebook carts, and getting our PCs imaged and ready for the upcoming school year. We are looking forward to having the students back in the buildings to utilize the new technology so they can build the required skills to be successful in their future endeavors."


Shown are Mr. Echelbarger (left) and Mr. Singer.

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