First Fridays

Monthly tips & Tools from your School Counselor

September 6, 2019

AT HERFF...

At Herff, we believe in whole child teaching, that behavior is a skill that must be taught. We utilize social contracts and Dan St. Romains' simple lessons to teach behavior expectation skills. We also believe that beyond the scope of safety and management of children, that social emotional skills are a vital part of our curriculum. Businesses and corporations are seeing a trend of young adults struggling to maintain employment, not due to job skills, yet are due to lack of soft skills. During our morning meeting time as well as integrated throughout all curriculum we are teaching these soft skills. Our focus for the first nine weeks is OPTIMISTIC THINKING.

BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT AND EXPECTATIONS

Punishment vs. Logical Consequences

Punishment vs. Logical Consequences

September 02, 2011

Logical consequences are directly related to children’s behaviors and help them to fix their mistakes.

The use of logical consequences is one part of an approach to discipline used in the Responsive Classroom. It’s a powerful way of responding to children’s misbehavior that not only is effective in stopping the behavior but is respectful of children and helps them to take responsibility for their actions.

Teachers often ask, “How are logical consequences any different from punishment?” It is a critical question because there are some basic and important diffrences between the two—differences that must be understood in order to use logical consequences well. Take the following example:

Six-year-old Jacob is zooming around the classroom when suddenly he trips and falls into Michelle’s block building. Michelle lets out a scream and the teacher comes over.


Continue to read the article...https://www.responsiveclassroom.org/punishment-vs-logical-consequences/

Teaching Social Contracts

Behavior is a skill that must be taught. When students make mistakes multiple times, reteaching must occur. Try to name the specific skill a student is struggling with. Once the skill is named, it can be taught and practiced. Parents can help out at home with specific skills their child is working on.

Want to see some awesome samples of teaching behavior expectations? Click on Dan's name below... he has multiple podcasts demonstrating how to teach specific skills. This resource can be helpful for classrooms, small groups or even at home.

Remember to use the 4 Questions for redirection...

Big picture

CLASSROOM GUIDANCE LESSONS: OPTIMISTIC THINKING

SOME GREAT BOOKS THAT TEACH OPTIMISTIC THINKING