African Natives Attitudes

By Mason M., Ivan O., Amanda L., Dylan B., Alexandra B.

Imperialism Begins

As well as fighting native tribes one-on-one most western forces caused conflicts between native tribes with already long standing conflicts in order to gain land, resources, and control. The extra problems created a bitter relationship between the native tribes that were used as well as putting even greater strain on long standing relationships between tribes, which caused great confusion in the political system of Africa. Many different countries viewed Africa as a free for all, and an excellent place to establish trade and power. Once Belgium started trade with the Congo in the late 1800's, a domino effect happened which caused European powers to quickly rush in to Africa. Of course, the natives didn't like this.


Attitudes Toward Imperialism

As British rule began to dictate African society, there was a lot of political immaturity through and through. This was not good for Africans, and they didn't take too kindly to having such a corrupt political system. Also, under foreign rule, all of the precious resources of Africa were mined and shipped to Europe, leaving Africa with nothing. New government control meant old religions and traditions were now outlawed. Plus, Europe set the borders of most of Africa's countries, completely disregarding the current relationships between tribes. The native Africans were being treated horribly, and they knew it. Many Africans became extremely upset and frustrated. Soon, after they started to support ideas of The Enlightenment, many African countries began to rebel to form a new national identity.


Africa Strikes Back

Most Africans really hated what was happening in their continent. By 1900, Europe had control of well over 90% of Africa, and the natives wanted to do something about it. Many different resistance movements occurred at this time, an example of which was the Bambatha rebellion, in which the Zulu chief Bambatha organized an armed rebellion against the British authorities. His people were being taxed heavily, and his land was being taken away and given to the European settlers. Many of these armed revolts happened over the years in various parts of Africa, and most were fueled by the desire for restored traditions and religions.


Works Cited

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"The Colonization of Africa." Online Exhibitions | The New York Public Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Aug. 2013. <http://exhibitions.nypl.org/africanaage/essay-colonization-of-africa.html>.


"The fight against colonialism and imperialism in Africa | South African History Online." South African History Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Aug. 2013. <http://www.sahistory.org.za/article/fight-against-colonialism-and-imperialism-africa-grade-11>.


"1750-1914 - Imperialism in Africa." New Canaan Public Schools - NCPS Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Sept. 2013. <http://www2.newcanaan.k12.ct.us/education/components/scrapbook/default.php?sectiondetailid=5501>.


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