They create their own LEVEL ????s

If they CREATE them, ... they will READ.

Asking questions is an important college and career readiness skill

In addition to asking the basic who, what, when, and where questions, students must begin asking higher-level questions that address issues of interpretation and analysis as they read. When they learn to question the test, they begin the process of critical thinking and connect with the text more fully.

3 types of questions

LEVEL ONE: Reading on the line #Recall_?

As students read, they are mentally asking questions that can be answered by explicit information they can physically locate the passage.

LEVEL TWO: Reading between the lines #Interpretive_?

Students make interpretations based upon details in the text.

LEVEL THREE: Reading beyond the lines for the Big Picture

Students move beyond the text to connect to universal meaning.

Level one

LEVEL ONE: READING ON THE LINE FOR RECALL QUESTIONS

As students read, they are mentally asking questions that can be answered by explicit information they can physically point out in the passage. Students “recall” or

'remember” facts and details that answer questions such as “Who?” “What?” “Where?” and “When?”


Examples from “Everyday Use”:

1) Question: What does Dee think about orchids?

Answer: Dee thinks orchids are “tacky flowers” (line 15).

2) Question: How does Maggie walk?

Answer: She walks like a “lame animal” (line 37), “feet in shuffle” (line 40)

Level two

LEVEL TWO: READING BETWEEN THE LINES FOR INTERPRETIVE QUESTIONS

Students make interpretations based upon details in the text. As they read, they are asking questions that can be answered by making inferences and assumptions based upon evidence in the text, such as “What does a detail or image represent, suggest, or personify?” Students generate questions that can be answered by interpreting, classifying, comparing, contrasting, and finding patterns. These questions are “interpretive” questions.


Examples from “Everyday Use”:

1) Question: How is the orchid the narrator wishes her daughter would give her symbolic of their relationship?

Answer: The narrator thinks orchids are beautiful. Dee, however, thinks orchids are “tacky” and unsophisticated. The orchid becomes a symbol of the conflict between mother and daughter, and the narrator’s fantasy suggests that she wishes Dee would accept her for who she really is (lines 14–15).

2) Question: How is the narrator different from the person Dee wishes her to be?

Answer: The narrator is masculine, rough, and uneducated. Dee wishes that her mother be more refined, quick-witted, and sophisticated (lines 16–26).


level three

Students move beyond the text to connect to universal meaning. As they read, they are asking mental questions like, “How does this text connect with my life, with life in a larger sense for all human beings, with my ideas about morality or values?” These questions are open-ended and go beyond the text. They are intended to provoke a discussion of abstract issues and thematic concerns. Students generate questions that can be answered by connecting literature to their own experiences or to universal meanings. These questions begin with ideas in the text but move from the “what?” of the text to the “so what” of the text—the abstract issues and thematic concerns. Specific textual references are NOT included.


Examples from “Everyday Use”:

1) Question: How does television impact the way we view family relationships?

Answer: Television can prevent viewers from seeing family relationships as complicated and complex. Television shows often present an idealized version of relationships, suggesting that this fantasy version of family relationships is “real.”

2) Question: What is a “good” mother?

Answer: Outside of her responsibilities to feed, clothe, and shelter her children, a mother also is expected to nurture, love, and support her children so that they become well-adjusted, successful adults. We imagine that so-called “good” mothers attempt to raise their children with the values and expectations important to the family’s culture,