School Bullying\Cell- Phone

Stop, Think, Respect...

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IS IT CYBER BULLYING?
Cyber bullying is the use of digital technologies with an intent to offend, humiliate, threaten, harass or abuse somebody.


Cyber bullying can include anything offensive, humiliating, threatening or abusive that is directed at you on an electronic form of communication. This includes via text, email, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, instant messaging and online games.

Examples of cyberbullying include:

• Nasty messages online or on the mobile phone
• Comments on your posts or posts about you
• Being excluded from online groups and forums
• Embarrassing photos being put online without your permission
• Rumours and lies about you on a website
• Offensive chat on online gaming
• Fake online profiles being created with an intent to defame



  • Never respond to anything that has been said or retaliate by doing the same thing back. Saying something nasty back or posting something humiliating in revenge may make matters worse or even get you in to trouble.
  • Screenshot anything that you think could be cyber bullying and keep a record of it on your computer.
  • Block and report the offending users to the appropriate social media platform.
  • Talk about it. You may not feel it at the time, but you seriously are not alone. Talking to somebody about bullying not only helps you seek support but it documents evidence and will take a huge weight from your shoulders.
  • Assess how serious the cyber bullying is. If it is light name calling from somebody that you don’t know, it may just be easier to just report and block that user.
  • Report it. If you are experiencing cyber bullying from somebody you go to school or college with, report it to a teacher. If somebody is threatening you, giving out your personal information or making you fear for your safety, contact the Police or an adult as soon as you can.
  • Be private. We recommend that you keep your social media privacy settings high and do not connect with anybody who you do not know offline. People may not always be who they say they are and you could be putting you and those that you care about the most at risk.
  • Talk to them. Sometimes it may be appropriate to request that a teacher or responsible adult hosts a mediation between you and the person who is bullying you online, if they go to the same school or college as you. A mediation can be scary but is often incredibly powerful. It is essentially a face-to-face conversation between you and the person bullying you in a controlled, equal environment.
  • Sympathise. Always remember that happy and secure people do not bully others. People that bully are going through a difficult time themselves and will often need a lot of help and support.