The Steam Engine

James Watt and Robert Fultons way of new Transportation

Who is James Watt/Robert Fulton?

  • James Watt and Robert Fulton both invented the steam engine.
  • James Watt was a Scottish Inventor that saw a need for a faster way of transportation.
  • Robert Fulton was an American Engineer/ Inventor that brought the steam boat to success in America.
  • They both together saw a better way of transporting goods.

Why and What?

  • The reason the steam engine was invented was to give a better and faster way of transportation. The steam engine was made because it was efficient and the fastest anybody had ever traveled was 20 mph or slower.
  • Previously other "engines" had been made but James Watt had found a way to make a piston back and forth. Using a crankshaft he had found a way to make back and forth motion from the piston to turn a wheel.
  • Since the invention of Watt's engine thing have boomed for society and the only thing that has changed from his idea is minor upgrades to make the engine more efficient.

Where and When?

  • In 1776, Watts engine had been finally found successful and was patented in London, England.
  • Since then all over the world the engine has been used to transport goods across land at a fast rate of speed. These Engines have also been used to travel by humans to see parts of the world that they had never seen before.
  • It took awhile for the Watt engine to become successful in use. It took around 11 years for the engine to become successful and patented.
  • Today with improvements done these engines are still used for transportation.

citations.

Kingsford, Peter W. "James Watt." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, 2016. Web. 09 Mar. 2016. <http://www.britannica.com/biography/James-Watt>.


Liva, Carl T. "Watt Biography." Watt Biography. N.p., 21 May 2013. Web. 09 Mar. 2016. <http://www.egr.msu.edu/~lira/supp/steam/wattbio.html>.


Shapiro, Phil. "The Invention of the Steam Engine." The Invention of the Steam Engine. N.p., July 2009. Web. 09 Mar. 2016. <http://www.his.com/~pshapiro/steam.engines.html>.