Ancient Roman FAQ's

Octavia Newman

Writing

The Romans did not use paper like we do today, they used papyrus which is a reed that grew along the Nile. The papyrus would dry into stiff, yet pliable sheets. Their main writing utensil was a quill dipped in ink. Another way the Romans wrote was on a shallow wooden tablet that held a thin layer of wax. The writer carved letters into the was with a stylus and later erased it by heating the tablet.

Family

The head of the family was the oldest father present, the head of the family had the right to control all property and to regulate and punish the other family members. The women didn't enjoy the same rights as men. The women mainly did work around the house. The father also made the decision to raise the baby or not. The baby was placed at the fathers feet. If the father picked him up they would raise the child, if the father walked away the baby would be left to die. Deformed babies were almost always not wanted. Names in roman families were different they were usually by social status, so if you were wealthy you would have a long meaningful name and if you weren't you would have a short, boring name.

Men's and Boy's Clothing

Wealthy men did not go outside without a toga draped over a tunica. There were strict rules about certain kinds of stripes, or clavi that could be worn on men's tunicas. Ancient boys sometimes were something called a bulla or a locket which contained an amulet. An amulet is a charm which was worn to ward off evil spirits that might effect him.

Women's and Girl's Clothing

Girls who weren't born into slavery were a toga over a tunic which had a purple boarder made out of wool.The purple boarder protected the wearer against the evil eye. Young girls were togas or bullas and once they reached puberty she took off her toga praetexta and dedicated it to the goddess "Fortuna Virginalis"

Citations

Citations for Ancient Rome Project

Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Names." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 181-182. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Roman Clothing." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear Through the Ages. Ed. Sara Pendergast, et al. 2nd ed. Vol. 1: The Ancient World. Detroit: UXL, 2013. 157-174. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"The Dress of Roman Women." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 106-109. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.