Sun Cancer

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Prolonged exposure to the sun can cause..

  • Pre-cancerous (actinic keratosis) and cancerous (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma) skin lesions - caused by loss of the skin's immune function
  • Benign tumors
  • Fine and coarse wrinkles
  • Freckles
  • Discolored areas of the skin, called mottled pigmentation
  • Sallowness -- a yellow discoloration of the skin
  • Telangiectasias -- the dilation of small blood vessels under the skin
  • Elastosis -- the destruction of the elastic and collagen tissue (causing lines and wrinkles)


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What Causes Skin Cancer

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun is the number-one cause of skin cancer, but UV light from tanning beds is just as harmful. Exposure to sunlight during the winter months puts you at the same risk as exposure during the summertime.


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Types

There are three main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Basal cell and squamous cell cancers are less serious types and make up 95% of all skin cancers. Also referred to as non-melanoma skin cancers, they are highly curable when treated early. Melanoma, made up of abnormal skin pigment cells called melanocytes, is the most serious form of skin cancer and causes 75% of all skin cancer deaths. Left untreated, it can spread to other organs and is difficult to control.


Symptoms

The most common warning sign of skin cancer is a change on the skin, typically a new mole or skin lesion or a change in an existing mole.

  • Basal cell carcinoma may appear as a small, smooth, pearly or waxy bump on the face ears and neck, or as a flat pink, red or brown lesion on the trunk or arms and legs.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma can appear as a firm, red nodule, or as a rough, scaly flat lesion that may bleed and become crusty. Both basal cell and squamous cell cancers mainly occur on areas of the skin frequently exposed to the sun, but can occur anywhere.
  • Melanoma usually appears as a pigmented patch or bump. It may resemble a normal mole, but usually has a more irregular appearance.

When looking for melanoma, think of the ABCD rule that tells you the signs to watch for:

  • Asymmetry - the shape of one half doesn't match the other
  • Border - edges are ragged or blurred
  • Color - uneven shades of brown, black, tan, red, white or blue
  • Diameter - A significant change in size (greater than 6mm)


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Always put on sunscreen, wither when going to the beach or outside. re-apply every 3-4 hours


How is Skin Cancer Treated?

Treatment of skin cancer is individualized and is determined by the type of skin cancer, its size and location, and the patient's preference.

Standard treatments for non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell or squamous cell carcinomas) include:

  • Mohs surgery (for high-risk non-melanoma skin cancers) – excision of cancer and some extra tissue
  • Electrodesiccation and curettage – physically scraping away the skin cancer cells followed by electrosurgery
  • Cryosurgery or freezing

Standard treatments for melanoma skin cancer include:

  • Wide surgical excision
  • Sentinel lymph node mapping (for deeper lesions) to determine if the melanoma has spread to local lymph nodes
  • Drugs (chemotherapy, biological response modifiers) for widespread disease
  • Radiation therapy for local control of advanced melanoma in areas such as the brain
  • New methods in clinical trials


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