The Sun

Iris Horton

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Core

The Sun's core is the central region where nuclear reactions consume hydrogen to form helium. These reactions release the energy that ultimately leaves the surface as visible light.


http://astrobob.areavoices.com/2008/10/26/can-you-feel-the-heat-beneath-your-feet/

http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/interior.shtml

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Radiative Zone

The Sun's radiative zone is the section of the solar interior between the innermost core and the outer convective zone. In the radiative zone, energy generated by nuclear fusion in the core moves outward as electromagnetic radiation. In other words, the energy is conveyed by photons.


http://3cotech.blogspot.com/2010/01/what-is-solar-radiation.html

http://www.windows2universe.org/sun/Solar_interior/Sun_layers/radiative_zone.html

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Convective Zone

It extends from a depth of 200,000 km up to the visible surface of the Sun. Energy is transported by convection in this region. The surface of the convection zone is where light (photons) is created.


https://www.cora.nwra.com/~werne/eos/text/convection_zone.html

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Photosphere

The photosphere is the visible surface of the Sun that we are most familiar with. Since the Sun is a ball of gas, this is not a solid surface but is actually a layer about 100 km thick (very, very, thin compared to the 700,000 km radius of the Sun).


solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/surface.shtml

https://www.eso.org/public/outreach/eduoff/vt-2004/mt-2003/mt-sun.html

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Chromosphere

The chromosphere (literally, "sphere of color") is the second of the three main layers in the Sun's atmosphere and is roughly 2,000 kilometers deep. It sits just above the photosphere and just below the solar transition region.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/20/nasa-blue-sun-photo_n_3307271.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromosphere

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Corona

A corona (Latin, 'crown') is an aura of plasma that surrounds the sun and other celestial bodies. The Sun's corona extends millions of kilometres into space and is most easily seen during a total solar eclipse, but it is also observable with a coronagraph.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corona

http://www.ecnmag.com/news/2015/08/understanding-suns-corona

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Sunspots

Sunspots are temporary phenomena on the photosphere of the Sun that appear visibly as dark spots compared to surrounding regions. They correspond to concentrations of magnetic field flux that inhibit convection and result in reduced surface temperature compared to the surrounding photosphere.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunspot

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2008/30sep_blankyear/


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Prominence

A prominence is a large, bright, gaseous feature extending outward from the Sun's surface, often in a loop shape. Prominences are anchored to the Sun's surface in the photosphere, and extend outwards into the Sun's corona.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_prominence

http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2007/locations/ttt_prominences.php

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Flare

A solar flare is a sudden flash of brightness observed near the sun's surface.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_flare

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Aurora

An aurora, sometimes referred to as a polar light, is a natural light display in the sky, predominantly seen in the high latitude (Arctic and Antarctic) regions.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora

http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/how-the-sun-causes-an-aurora/


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