Prisoners other than Jews

Person/People

Prisoners during the Holocaust

The Holocaust didn't only effect the Jews. We have found records proving that the germans affected (exterminated) over millions of Comunnists, Czechs, Greeks, Gypsies, Homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, mentally and physically handicapped, Poles, resistance fighters, Russians, Serbs, Socialists, Spanish Republicans unionists, Ukrainains, Yugoslavians, prisoners of war of many nations, and still others. Before the war they were named for their race, religion, health, sex orientation, or even in poltics, but after the war they were just targets to the Natzis.

What made them memorable

The reasons why these prisoners were important was because they were still a group that was persecuted for unjust reasons. Prisoners were required to wear color-coded triangles on their jackets. This was so the guards and officers of the camps could easily identify each persons background, and put the different groups against each other. Political prisoners such as Communists, Socialists, and trade unionists wore the red triangles. Common criminals wore green triangles. Romans (Gypsies) and others the Germans considered "asocial" or "shiftless" wore black triangles. Jehovah's Witness wore purple and homosexuals had to wear pink triangles. Letters indicated nationality, for example F stands for French.

Conclusion

Gypsy men, women, and children were confined together in a seperate camp. On the night of August 2, 1944, a large group of roma was gassed in the destruction of the "Gypsy family camp". Nearly 3,000 Roma, including most of the women and children. Some of the men were sent to forced-labor camps in Germany where many died. Altogether, hundreds of thousands of Roma from all over occupied Europe were murdered in camps and by mobile killing squads. Political prisoners, Jehovah's Witness, and homosexuals were sent to concentration camps as punishment. Members of these 3 groups weren't targeted, as Jews and Roma, systematic murder. Nevertheless, many died in the camps from starvation, disease, exhaustion, and cruel treatment.