Greek & Roman Sculpture

by: Raven Bey

Greek Sculptures

  • The Greeks mainly used stone and bronze.

  • When the Greeks carved into stone, they would use either Marble or Limestone. After they would coat them in wax and oil to preserve the paint and to make it shine.

  • Greeks learned in 500 B.C how to hollow bronze statues. Large bronze statues were usually made in several pieces then bolted together.

  • For several centuries Greek sculptures went through several changes in style. In general they became more realistic and emotionally expressive.

  • In the early Archaic period, they depict animals. Although there are also sculptures of human beings, fewer of them exist,and they seem less skillfully made. Because these early sculptures emphasized the geometric shapes that make up the figures, the style of early Archaic sculptures is called Geometric.
  • In Washington D.C the government builds use pillars like the Parthenon.
  • Architecture, gravestones based directly on ancient Greek prototypes start to appear.
  • Today most of our sculptures are of important people like for example some of our presidents have just a head.

Roman sculptures

  • Sculptors in Rome worked with a variety of materials, including clay, bronze, precious metals, marble

  • Roman sculpture has its roots in Etruria, an ancient country north of Rome.
  • Roman sculpture usually depicted historical events, especially military victories, whereas Greek sculpture usually portrayed myths,

  • Despite the strong Greek influence, the Etruscan roots survived in Roman sculpture, giving it a distinctive style

Citation Page

"Sculpture, Greek." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 4. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 30-33. World History in Context. Web. 15 Dec. 2014

"Roman Sculpture." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 425-429. World History in Context. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.

"Sculpture, Roman." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 4. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 33-36. World History in Context. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.