Hagia Sophia

Taylor C.

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History

The Hagia Sophia is located in Istanbul, Turkey. It was originally built in 532AD by the Justinian Emperor. It was built on Constantinople in under 6 years, then, the Christian/Islamic basilica was burned in 415AD in the Nike Riot. After the riot, the basilica was eventually rebuilt and then converted to a Christian Mosque. Today, The Hagia Sophia is a museum in modern Istanbul. There are remains of the Christian and Islamic mosaics located throughout the museum.
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Sacredness

At first, the Hagia Sophia was a basilica that practiced Christianity. Throughout history, the basilica became a Christian Mosque and then it shared sacredness with the Islamic religion. Both Islamic people and Christian people worshiped here. Today no worship takes place inside the Hagia Sophia but it is open to the public as a museum.


The Hagia Sophia had shared religious worship over time. The Christians and Muslims went back and forth removing the other religions' belongings out of the ancient basilica until the finally came to an agreement and shared the basilica. When you go inside the Hagia Sophia, you would see the holy symbols of the Islams on the wall and the sacred mosaics of the Christians on the ceiling and archway of the central dome. Both of these symbols represent the two religions coming together and sharing a sacred place.

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Location

The Hagia Sophia is located on the northern coastline of Turkey near the Black Sea. Built in Constantinople which is now modern-day Istanbul. Today the Hagia Sophia is the no. 1 tourist attraction in Turkey with over 3,574,043 people who have visited the museum!

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Description

The Hagia Sophia was built by the Justinian Emperor in 512 a.d. The museum is built with four concrete minarets that surround the central dome of the Hagia Sophia. Located inside the museum are the famous mosaics built entirely of small stone tiles. There are also fascinating hand-carved stone pillars. The Hagia Sophia has many stunning remnants of both the Christian and Islamic faiths. There are the mosaics of Jesus, Mary and Joseph representing Christianity, and there are symbols hanging from the ceiling representing the Islamic religion.


The Hagia Sophia's authenticity seems like nobody has ever laid a finger on it but, the museum has been burned, torn down, rebuilt, burned again and has been through countless conversions of its faith. But today, the Hagia Sophia stands tall as a museum to represent both Christian and Islamic faiths. The old mosque was burned twice in the Nike Riots of 415AD. After many conversions and torture, the Hagia Sophia is now a museum today.

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Works Cited

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