Orphans - Lyrical Analysis

The Lane Cove

The Lane Cove | Orphans w/Lyrics

Lyrics

Our whole lives we've looked to the skies, (A)
and begged whatever's up there to tell us why, (A)
we were always the kids to be left behind, (B)
and what the fuck we've done wrong to be cast aside. (B)

We're the Autumn leaves, (A)
blowing in the Summer breeze. (A)
We're the boiling water that refuses to freeze. (A)
We're the lonely child without a mind at ease. (A)
We are the dying breed of rebelling children.
We'll never succeed. (A)

We will never become what we want to be. (A)
Disappointment has become a part of me. (A)
In my heart there's a grave, (B)
where I will one day bury this hate, (B)
for every laughing boy with a smile on his face, (C)
and the mother that raised him with no pain to face. (C)

Someone please put a bullet in my brain, (A)
and blow away this fucking pain! (A)


Lyrical Analysis

The song, "Orphans", by The Lane Cove, conveys a blend of cynicism, animosity, hatred, and pure sadness, both musically and lyrically.

Vocalist, Christopher Mackertish, through both voice and lyrical content, paints a perfect mental portrayal of the lifestyle and mindset faced by many in the situation that is described within the lyrics.

"Our whole lives we've looked to the skies, (A)
and begged whatever's up there to tell us why, (A)
we were always the kids to be left behind, (B)
and what the fuck we've done wrong to be cast aside. (B)"

Mackertish uses a blend of rhyme, alliteration (in the use of the 'w' sound), and rhetorical questions within the first verse of the song. Using words to describe the urgency and angst of the questions, such as "begged", and a swear word within the fourth line. He also describes a lack of faith, in questioning the existence of a God, rather than perhaps saying, "and begged to God to tell us why", he instead questions the existence of any God by describing it as "whatever's up there". This lack of faith adds to the feeling of helplessness within the lives he portrays through the song.

"We're the Autumn leaves, (A)
blowing in the Summer breeze. (A)
We're the boiling water that refuses to freeze. (A)
We're the lonely child without a mind at ease. (A)
We are the dying breed of rebelling children.
We'll never succeed. (A)"

Within the second verse, metaphors coupled with rhymes are used as poetic devices describing and acceptance of the lives that are lead by the characters portrayed within the story. "We're the Autumn leaves, blowing in the Summer breeze", shows a sense that Mackertish, and those described in the story, face an ever present feeling that they do not belong, and are displaced amongst their peers and society.

"We will never become what we want to be. (A)
Disappointment has become a part of me. (A)
In my heart there's a grave, (B)
where I will one day bury this hate, (B)
for every laughing boy with a smile on his face, (C)
and the mother that raised him with no pain to face. (C)"

Perhaps the most powerful verse within the song, within its use of poetical devices, and the description of the pure hatred for those faced with a life much more fair than those described in the song. Acceptance of fate and a displacement within society is again described within the opening lyric, an acceptance that they feel as though they can never amount to what they strive for.
The verse is then switched from a sense of personal sadness and regret, to a direct attack and description of how they feel towards children born into fruitful lives, without a difficulty to face beyond their petty problems.
A metaphor is also used, in describing that his heart still holds room for forgiveness, and a release of the hate that he feels. However, at the same time this adds to the overall mood of the song, as it conveys that he is not yet ready to let go of his hatred.

"Someone please put a bullet in my brain, (A)
and blow away this fucking pain! (A)"

The final lyrics are used in repetition, in a voice that describes utmost pain. This verse describes perhaps the most disturbingly relevant feeling that can be faced by many, that the feeling of death would be less painful than that of life. This verse can be seen, rather than just a lyric in a song, but perhaps more of a plea for help,
or a plea for death.