British Literature 2013-2014

Ms Collins and Ms Burbage

Syllabus

Overview

British literature has had an influence on American culture and literature. Through an examination of British literature,
students become active readers; critical and logical thinkers; and clear, concise writers. Students learn a variety of
strategies to develop the reading and writing skills necessary for success in any discipline. Each unit follows a structure
designed to enhance existing reading, comprehension, writing, speaking, and listening skills, while at the same time
using British literature to develop students’ vocabulary. The weekly process includes written assignments, organizational
exercises, and oral presentations in podcast format. At the end of this course, students gain an understanding of British
literature and increase their reading, comprehension, speaking, listening, and writing skills.


Reading

Students will read a wide cross section of English Literature. Many links are found within the course. However, there are some pieces that will be sent to the students via mail.


Assignments

Students will take assignments located with the course. In addition, there are writing assignments. Students can NOT pass the course without completing the writing assignments. They are a major component of this course.


Recorded Lessons

Recorded Lessons for EVERY lesson in British Literature will be posted on Ms Collins' and Ms Burbage's Edmodo pages on a weekly basis. Every Monday, five lessons worth of recordings will be posted, This will correspond to the percentage that a student should be keeping up with in the course. The students have the option of watching these recordings at the time most convenient to them.


Classroom Rules

1. Log into your course every day.
2. Watch your the recording that corresponds to your lesson on a daily basis.
3. You should be in contact with your teacher every week- respond to calls, texts and/or emails.
4. Be respectful of your fellow students and teachers.
5. Ask for help when you need it.


Plaigarism Policy

Plagiarism Policy

Plagiarism is the representation of the words or ideas of another as one's own in any academic work. Examples of plagiarizing in an online course include, but are not limited to:

· Using unauthorized aids on an assignment, essay, quiz, or test; having someone, other than the student, complete an assignment, essay, quiz, or test; submitting another person’s work; or rescheduling a deadline on a false excuse.

· Submitting the same work for more than one course or assignment without prior written approval from the instructor(s).

· Using copyrighted material without appropriate citation or copying software or media files (such as music, movies, etc.) without permission.

· Destroying, tampering, or altering another student’s work to impede academic progress. Signing in to a live session for another student who is not present and/or leaving a session without logging off or without indicating that you have “stepped away”.

To avoid plagiarism, every direct quotation must be identified by quotation marks, or by appropriate indentation, and must be cited properly according to the accepted format for the particular discipline. Acknowledgment is also required when material from any source is paraphrased or summarized in whole or in part in one's own word. Information that is common knowledge, such as names of leaders of prominent nations, basic scientific laws, etc, need not be cited; however, the sources of all facts or information obtained in reading or research that are not common knowledge among students in the course must be acknowledged. In addition to materials specifically cited in the text, other materials that contribute to one's general understanding of the subject may be acknowledged in the bibliography.

Sometimes, plagiarism can be a subtle issue. Students are encouraged to discuss any questions about what constitutes plagiarism with the teacher of the course. Consequences can include receiving a zero on part of the assignment, all of the assignment or receiving an F for the course.

· First Offense: Discussion with the student, parent, and teacher.

· Second Offense (in the same course): Meeting with the student, parent, teacher and administrator.

· Third Offense: Administration will assemble a committee comprised of teachers, counselor, student(s), and an administrator. The committee will listen to the facts and make a recommendation to the Director.

Foundations British Literature Course Breakdown

Reading List- Part 1
Beowulf Link
“Ode on a Grecian Urn” by John Keats
“Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley
“Soul’s Joy, Now I am Gone” by John Donne
“Sonnet 73” by William Shakespeare
"My Last Duchess" by Robert Browning
"A Valediction Forbidding Mourning" by John Donne
Donne Songs- biography and song339
Donne Songs- Songs 348 and 387
”All the World’s a Stage” by William Shakespeare
Poetry by Marlowe and Raleigh
“The Battle of Agincourt” by William Shakespeare
“How do I love Thee? Let me Count The Ways” Browning
“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Goodnight” by Dylan Thomas
“In Westminster Abbey” and “Devonshire Street W1” by John Betjeman
“Naming of Parts” by Henry Reed
“Not Waving, But Drowning” by Stevie Smith
“Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister” by Browning
“The Shephearde’s Calendar” by Edmund Spencer
“The Golden Speech”
Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Writing Assignments- Part 1
Lesson 10: Outline for a Persuasive Essay
Lesson 20: Rough Draft for a Persuasive Essay
Lesson 35: Final draft for the Persuasive Essay

Reading List- Part 2
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
“The Love Story of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot
“Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger” by Saki
“Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold
“Loveliest of Trees” by A. E. Housman

Writing Assignments- Part 2
Lesson 10: Outline for a Descriptive Essay
Lesson 20: Rough Draft for a Descriptive Essay
Lesson 35: Final Draft for a Descriptive Essay

Reading List – Part 3
“Canterbury Tales” by Geoffrey Chaucer
Blake Poetry
“Barry’s Bulletin”
“When Harry Met Sexism”
“Rivers of Blood” by Enoch Powell
“Sermon on the Mound” by Margaret Thatcher
“We Shall Fight on The Beaches” by Winston Churchill
“No Faith In The Media”
“The Fallacy of Success” by Chesterton
“if” by Rudyard Kipling
“Ode: Imitations of Immorality…” by Wordsworth
“Daybreak” by Stephen Spender
“Of Death” and “Of Adversity” by Sir Francis Bacon
“Winds of Change” by Harold Macmillan
Marc Antony’s Speech from Julius Caesar
“The Adventure of The Dying Detective” by Doyle

Writing Assignments- Part 3
Lesson 10: Outline for an essay on Irony
Lesson 20: Rough Draft for an essay on Irony
Lesson 35: Final Draft for essay on Irony

Reading List- Part 4
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
“The Thought Fox” by Ted Hughes
“Ode to the West Wing” by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Pygmalion by Shaw

Writing Assignments- Part 4
Lesson 10: Outline for a Research Paper
Lesson 20: Rough Draft for a Research Paper
Lesson 35: Final Draft for a Research Paper


Honors British Literature Course Breakdown

Reading List - Part 1

“If,” by Rudyard Kipling
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Adventure of the Dying Detective.”
John Betjeman’s “In Westminster Abbey.”
John Betjeman’s “Devonshire Street W1
Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice
Macbeth, by William Shakespeare
Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens
My Last Duchess, by Robert Browning
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein
“Naming of Parts,” by Henry Reed
“Not Waving, But Drowning,” by Stevie Smith
“The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolfe
“The Kiss,” by Angela Carter (The Oxford Book of English Short Stories)
“Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister,” by R. Browning
“Bill the Bloodhound” by P.G. Wodehouse

Writing Assignments – Part 1
Unit 1 Lesson 1: Expository essay about a person- based on “If”
Unit 1 Lesson 5: Create an outline for an autobiographical narrative
Unit 1 Lesson 6: Expository essay about a character from Pride and Prejudice
Unit 1 Lesson 10: Rough Draft of an autobiographical narrative
Unit 1 Lesson 11: Expository essay about a character from “Macbeth”
Unit 1 Exam: Final draft of an autobiographical narrative
Unit 2 Lesson 1: Persuasive essay about “Macbeth”
Unit 2 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a short story
Unit 2 Lesson 6: Persuasive essay on a chosen topic
Unit 2 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a short story
Unit 2 Lesson 11: Persuasive essay based on a theme from Great Expectations
Unit 2 Exam: Final draft for a short story
Unit 3 Lesson 1: Write an essay using narrative elements
Unit 3 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a persuasive essay on chosen topic
Unit 3 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a persuasive essay
Unit 3 Exam: Final draft for a persuasive essay

Reading List - Part 2
Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights
Beowulf
“Definition of Greatness in Art” from Modern Painters by John Ruskin
“Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Shakespeare’s “All the World’s a Stage”
Paradise Lost, Book X, by John Milton
George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion
Shepheardes Calender by Edmund Spenser
Christopher Marlowe’s “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love”
Sir Walter Raleigh’s “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd”
“The School for Scandal” by Richard Brinsley Sheridan
E. M. Forster’s “My Wood”

Writing Assignments – Part 2
Unit 1 Lesson 1: Informational essay about a setting in Wuthering Heights
Unit 1 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a descriptive essay focusing on a setting
Unit 1 Lesson 6: Informational essay about any aspect of setting in Wuthering Heights
Unit 1 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a descriptive essay focusing on a setting
Unit 1 Lesson 11: Informational essay about the setting of Beowulf
Unit 1 Exam: Final draft for a descriptive essay focusing on a setting
Unit 2 Lesson 1: Persuasive essay comparing themes in “Definition of Greatness in Art”
Unit 2 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a comparison/contrast essay based on a piece of literature and a movie or a scene from a play
Unit 2 Lesson 6: Persuasive essay based on a theme from “Ozymandias”
Unit 2 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a comparison/contrast essay based on a piece of literature and a movie or a scene from a play
Unit 2 Lesson 11: Persuasive essay on a theme from Paradise Lost
Unit 2 Exam: Final draft for a comparison/contrast essay based on a piece of literature and a movie or a scene from a play
Unit 3 Lesson 1: Narrative essay that focuses on satire
Unit 3 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a satirical descriptive essay
Unit 3 Lesson 6: Create a narrative essay about a theme from “Shephearde’s Calendar”
Unit 3 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a satirical descriptive essay
Unit 3 Lesson 11: Narrative essay about an allegory or allusion
Unit 3 Exam: Final draft for a satirical descriptive essay

Reading List - Part 3
Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales
Jonathan Swift’s essay “A Modest Proposal
Saki’s (Munro’s) “Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger Link
William Blake’s Songs of Innocence (“Introduction”; “The Lamb”) Link and Songs of Experience (“Introduction” and “The Tyger”)
William Golding’s Lord of the Flies (Not available online)
Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach”
Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray
T.S. Eliot’s The Love Song of Alfred J. Prufrock
Robert Graves’ “She Tells Her Love While Half Asleep”
William Wordsworth’s “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood”
Stephen Spender’s “Daybreak”
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Francis Bacon’s essays “Of Death” and “Of Adversity”

Writing Assignments – Part 3
Unit 1 Lesson 1: Informational essay about irony in Canterbury Tales
Unit 1 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a short story using situational irony
Unit 1 Lesson 6: Expository essay about irony in “The Wife of Bath’s Tale”
Unit 1 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a short story using irony of situation
Unit 1 Lesson 11: Expository essay about the use of irony in “A Modest Proposal”
Unit 1 Exam: Final draft for a short story using situational irony
Unit 2 Lesson 1: Persuasive essay about symbolism found in William Blake’s poetry
Unit 2 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a descriptive essay about a symbol
Unit 2 Lesson 6: Persuasive essay about symbolism in Lord of The Flies
Unit 2 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a descriptive essay about a symbol
Unit 2 Lesson 11: Persuasive essay about symbolism in The Picture of Dorian Gray
Unit 2 Exam: Final draft for a descriptive essay about a symbol
Unit 3 Lesson 1: Narrative essay about elements of style used in “The Love song of J Alfred
Prufrock”
Unit 3 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a cause and effect expository essay
Unit 3 Lesson 6: Narrative essay about an element of style on the gothic novel Frankenstein
Unit 3 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a cause and effect expository essay
Unit 3 Lesson 11: Narrative essay on style in Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Unit 3 Exam: Final draft for a cause and effect expository essay

Reading List - Part 4
Brick Lane by Miriam Ali (not available online)
A.E. Coppard’s “Some Talk of Alexander” (The Oxford Book of English Short Stories)
Mary Mann’s “Little Brother” (The Oxford Book of English Short Stories)
Thomas Hardy’s “A Mere Interlude” from The Oxford Book of English Short Stories
Sylvia Warner’s “A Widow’s Quilt” from The Oxford Book of English Short Stories
George Orwell’s Animal Farm
No Faith in the Media, – Guardian, June 17, 2002, by Ahmed Versi
Barry’s Bulletin, Fall 2003, From the Media Awareness Network
Bidisha’s “When Harry Met Sexism,” from The Guardian, May 22, 2008
Harold Macmillan’s Winds of Change
Enoch Powell’s “Rivers of Blood”
Margaret Thatcher’s “Sermon on the Mound”
Marc Antony’s speech in Act III, Scene 2 of Julius Caesar
Winston Churchill’s speech, “We shall Fight on the Beaches”
Percy Bysshe Shelley’s “Ode to the West Wind”
“The Battle of Agincourt,” from Shakespeare’s Henry V
Elizabeth I’s speech, “The Golden Speech”
Robert Browning’s “How do I Love thee: Let me Count the Ways”
Ted Hughes’ “The Thought Fox”
Francis Thompson’s “The Hound of Heaven
Dylan Thomas’s “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night”

Writing Assignments – Part 4
Unit 1 Lesson 1: Informational essay about a problem in contemporary society
Unit 1 Lesson 5: Create an outline for a Research Paper- topic to be chosen by student
Unit 1 Lesson 6: Informational essay about a problem in contemporary society addressed in
Brick Lane
Unit 1 Lesson 10: Rough draft for Research Paper
Unit 1 Lesson 11: Comparison/ Contrast essay about a contemporary issue
Unit 1 Exam: Final draft for Research Paper
Unit 2 Lesson 1: Persuasive essay about propaganda techniques used in Animal Farm
Unit 2 Lesson 5: Outline for a persuasive essay defending a position on a controversial issue
Unit 2 Lesson 6: Persuasive essay about cultural stereotypes
Unit 2 Lesson 10: Rough draft for a persuasive essay defending a position on a controversial
issue
Unit 2 Lesson 11: Persuasive essay about an oral presentation
Unit 2 Exam: Final draft for a persuasive essay defending a position on a controversial issue
Unit 3 Lesson 1: Develop the outline for a rhetorical narrative piece
Unit 3 Lesson 6: Develop the rough draft for a rhetorical narrative piece
Unit 3 Lesson 11: Final draft for a rhetorical narrative piece