Labor Camp Life

By: Aaron Trekell

How Camp Life Changed Holocaust Victims

Camp life changed prisoners dramatically. They no longer viewed themselves or others as human beings, but as bodies or dead weight. They would trade for items with the only resource they had, bread rations. They would trample and kill to survive in these camps. every day they would be forced to labor and would receive blows. Family was a thing in the past. Some would leave family behind to die just to increase their chances of survival. For the rest of their life I don't think that they ever really trusted other human beings again.
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The 3 Themes of Night. Humans can do anything... Elie's survival of the Holocaust, and that Faith can't always move mountains

In Elie Wiesel's Night he shows that humans can do just about anything. I'm not talking about super powers or special abilities, I'm talking about what they can and would do to survive in the hell known as the holocaust. Throughout the book Elie talks of scenarios he experienced first-hand. He witnessed how family members and strangers alike turned on and killed each other for rations of bread and to increase their own chance of surviving. In one of the accounts near the middle of chapter 7, Meir, the head of their train car, kills his own father for a piece of bread but ends up having the bread stolen from him before he could eat it all. Elie also talks about what he had to do to survive in the labor camps. He tells of how he and his father learned to play the game in order to survive. The game is pretty much the prisoners survival handbook, and once they learn it, camp life gets that much easier. He also wrote that he taught his father how to march in time in order for him to have a better chance of survival. The final theme in my mind is that faith can't always move mountains. This in my opinion is a huge part for Elie and the book. In the beginning of the book he talks of how he just wants to further his path toward religion and that religion is not only a hobby, but a part of who he is. Even though the Jews are put through this horrible treatment, most questioned the God that left them to rot, while others held on to their faith in God because it was the only thing they had left in life. Elie said that he had given up on religion because he couldn't stand a God who stood idly by while his followers and worshipers perished and were humiliated in such profound ways.
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