Benvolio

People should promote peace above their own gain.

Act 1 Scene 1

Bevolio is a known pacifist and is often seen trying to avoid conflict. Upon seeing the developing feud in the first scene, Benvolio says, "Part, fools! Put up your swords. You know not what you do" 995. Benvolio doesn't take sides, but instead claims to "...do but keep the peace". Benvolio obviously puts great value in peace and instead of siding with the Montagues like most would expect, he attempts to be the mediator.
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Act 3 Scene 1

In the first scene of act one, hot-headed and slightly delirious Mercutio walked the streets of Verona deliberately ignoring Benvolio's warnings of the chance of a Capulet confrontation. Benvolio pleads with Mercutio, saying "I pray thee, good Mercutio, let's retire. The day is hot, the Capulets abroad, and if we meet, we shall not scape a brawl, for now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring." 1025 It is very obvious that Benvolio doesn't care for the conflict between the houses and does all he can to make sure their better resentment of each other doesn't come to any sort of physical fruition.
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Act 2 Scene 2

Benvolio cares for Romeo. He is constantly looking out for him. When Romeo attempts to meet Juliet, Benvolio persuades Mercutio not to pursue Romeo, saying "Come, he hath hid himself among these trees to be consorted with the humorous night. Blind is his love and best befits the dark" 1005. Though Benvolio in unaware of Romeo's love for Juliet, he acknowledges his love of solitude and doesn't want Mercutio to interfere.
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Theme: People should promote peace above their own gain.

Benvolio is never swayed by irrational emotions and dishonest obligations. He understands the ridiculousness of the Capulet/Montague feud and does all he can to mediate between them. (Even though, being a Montague, it would be expected that he take the Montague's side.) If the characters in the story were to realize that they shouldn't be blinded by this feud and instead see the rational side of things, the tragic ending could have been avoided. Benvolio is one of the few wise enough to acknowledge this. He most exemplifies this when he tells the Prince the complete truth of what happened between Romeo, Mercutio, and Tybalt; thus refusing to take a side. This is explained in lines 1659-1660 and 1669-1670, "O noble prince, I can discover all. The unlucky manage of this fatal brawl.... Tybalt, here slain, who's Romeo's hand did slay; Romeo that spoke him fair, bade him bethink..." Benvolio does not weigh the story in the Montague's favor but instead answers truthfully for the sake of honesty and the common good.