The Hagia Sophia

Sofia L.

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Location

Turkey is a country located in Europe. Turkey has many different and interesting places that you can visit. One of the interesting places is the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, Turkey.

Description

The Hagia Sophia has many beautiful features included in it. To enter the building you have to go through to large marble doors that protect the museum.The inside of the Hagia Sophia has panels of colored marble the cover the walls. An enormous central dome opens up and is over 80 feet tall. The ceiling in the central dome is so high because it is suppose to represent heaven in the sky. To support the central dome they added four lovely arches. The north and south walls are almost completely open with twelve windows on each side. When the building was first created the upper part of it had many different gold pieces in it and the original church didn't have the figural mosaics or the minarets.

History

The Hagia Sophia is a very interesting place, with a very interesting history. It begins in 537 BC when Constantine the Great decided to build a great church. During its years as a church it was the seat of the Orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople. The building was later partially burned and then rebuilt. Some time after they rebuilt the building a huge earthquake shook the city, causing parts of the building to collapse again. After a few years the building was fully restored and continued as a church. In 1453 AD the church was discovered by Sultan Mehmet the Conqueror and then changed into an imperial mosque. The last change they made was in 1935 when the President converted it from an imperial mosque to the current Ayasofya Museum.
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Religion

The Hagia Sophia has represented many different religions over many years. It originally represented the Roman Catholic people as a Byzantine church. It was founded by Constantine the Great. Then for a small period of time it was a Eastern Orthodox by the Emperor Theodosius. Finally the church was converted into an imperial mosque. Sultan Mehmet the Conqueror believed in the Muslim religion and changed the church into the imperial mosque. This means that the Hagia Sophia has represented two separate religions. The Roman Catholic religion and the Muslim religion.

Sacredness

It is very interesting how the Hagia Sophia has not only represented multiple religions but it has also been a very important part of those religions. It started off as a church for the Christian religion. People would go there to pray or for holidays and ceremonies. For many years it was the seat of Orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople who also believed in Christianity. After quite some time it was converted into an imperial mosque. It now represented the Muslim religion and was the main place for imperial ceremonies. Just like when it was a church people would go their for important parts of their religion. Many years later the government changed it to a museum where anybody can learn more about the Hagia Sophia.
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Interesting Facts

The Hagia Sophia is a very interesting place with a lot of very interesting facts. Did you know that Hagia Sophia actually means "Holy Wisdom?" This makes a lot of sense since it is a very holy spot to some religions. It also was a great place of wisdom for the people following those religions. When the building was first created it wasn't called the Hagia Sophia it was actually called "Megale Ekklesia" which means "great church." Outside of the Hagia Sophia are real stone cannonballs that lead to the courtyard. Due to destruction of the building in the past the current building is actually fireproof. There are many facts about the Hagia Sophia but I just listed a few.
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Hagia Sophia Website

Press this button ^ and it will take you to the official Hagia Sophia Website if you would like to learn more.

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Works Cited

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“Hagia Sophia.” encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Feb. 2016. <http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Hagia+Sophia>.

“Hagia Sophia, 532-37.” Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. N.p., 2009. Web. 4 Feb. 2016. <http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/haso/hd_haso.htm>.

Hayes, Holly. “Sacred Sites at Sacred Destinations- Explore.” Sacred Destinations. N.p., 18 Sept. 2009. Web. 2 Feb. 2016. <http://www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/istanbul-hagia-sophia>.

Holly. “Worship.” Sacred Destinations. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2016. <http://www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/istanbul-hagia-sophia>.

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“Map of Turkey.” Adelphi University. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Feb. 2016. <https://adelphi-sa.terradotta.com/_customtags/ct_Image.cfm?Image_ID=69485>.

“Night Hagia Sophia.” Wallpapers. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2016. <https://wall.alphacoders.com/big.php?i=525893>.

“Sunny Hagia Sophia.” Live Science. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2016. <http://www.livescience.com/27574-hagia-sophia.html>.

“Sunset over Hagia Sophia.” Themes. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2016. <http://7-themes.com/7031590-hagia-sophia-istanbul.html>.

“Wall Art in Hagia Sophia.” Hagia Sophia. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2016. <http://www.pallasweb.com/deesis/constantine-justinian-hagia-sophia.html>.

“Wall Art 2.” Live Science. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2016. <http://www.livescience.com/27574-hagia-sophia.html>.