Of Mice And Men

By; John Steinbeck

Novel Summary..

John Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men novel, Steinbeck's story of George and Lennie's problems of owning their own ranch, and the problems that stand in the way of that dignity, loneliness, and sacrifice. Lennie, the mentally handicapped giant who makes George's dream of owning his own ranch worthwhile, becomes the greatest problem to achieving that dream. During the book they overcome some problems , but solve them at the end of the day.

John Steinbeck

AUTHOR

  • Born February 27, 1902
  • Died December 20, 1968

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Theme Analysis

One major theme in John Steinbeck's novel of Mice & Men would be loneliness. The theme of loneliness is most noticeable in Candy, Crooks, and Curley's wife. Candy's dog stopped Candy from being alone in the world. After its death, Candy struggles against loneliness by sharing in George and Lennie's dream. Curley's wife is also lonely, she is the only female on the ranch, and her husband has forbidden anyone to talk with her. She works through her loneliness by flirting with the ranch hands. Crooks is isolated because of his skin color. As the only black man on the ranch, he is not allowed into the bunkhouse with the others, and he does not associate with them. He works through his loneliness with books and his work.
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Curley

  • Son of the boss
  • High heeled boots
  • Prizefighter
  • Aggressive young man
  • Recently married

Crooks

  • Black stable hand
  • Gets his name from his crooked back
  • Proud, bitter , caustically funny

Curleys Wife

  • Only female in the book
  • Was never given a name
  • Referred as a tramp, tart, looloo
  • Fancy feathered shoes, red lipstick

Significant Quote

"Suppose there was a carnival or a circus to come to town, or a ball game, or any damn thing." Old Candy nodded in appreciation of the idea. "We'd just go to her," George said. “We wouldn’t ask nobody if we could. Just say, ‘We’ll go to her, an we would. Just milk the cow and sling some grain to the chickens an’ go to her.” (Steinbeck76).
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