Electromagnetism

By: Robbie, Mackenzie, Dallin, Angela

Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla was an electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, and physicist. He invented the florescent light, induction motor, and the Tesla-coil, which is still used in today's radios and TVs. He was credited with inventing modern radio. All of his scientific discoveries and inventions made him become "Badass of the Week" in 2006. Tesla spoke eight languages along with almost single-handingly developing technology that harassed the power of electricity for household use.
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Television

TV's use electric force to beam particles down the tube that runs from the back of the TV to the front, where the screen is.
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Pulling a fire alarm

When you pull a fire alarm, you activate an electromagnet which sends an electric force through the wires and activates the other alarms.
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Charging le phone

The pins on the connector which goes inside the phone use magnetic force to transmit electricity along the pins on the inside of the phone via induction.
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Starting a car

When you insert the key and turn it inside of the ignition, an electromagnet comes in contact with another electromagnet, causing the motor in the vehicle to sputter and cough until it starts (vroom, vroom). The motor could be considered a generator, since it converts electrical energy to mechanical energy.
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School bells

School bells take advantage of the school's electric field, transmitting signals across the campus to signal the end of a class period by ringing violently.
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Listening to Music

IPods take advantage of the phone's magnetic field by transmitting magnetic forces through the headphone wires and emitting sound energy.
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