Wanted

Liquid or Gas

Bromine's Crimes:

Bromine is used for making pesticides, flame retardents, water purinfication, pool maintnence tools, and medicine.

Aliases:

Bromines chemical symbol is Br. Its name originates from the Greek word "bromos," which means something that smells bad. Bromine ions are called bromides. Bromine in French is brome, and in German is Brom.

Description:

Bromine in its natural form is a liquid and is a reddish-brown color. Bromine is a nonmetal. Its atomic number is 35, and its atomic mass is 79.904 atomic mass units.
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Bohr Diagram

The Bohr Diagram shows how many protons and nuetrons Bromine has.

First arresting officer:

The man who discovered Bromine is named Carl Lowig. Antoine Jerome Balard however is known for it, because Lowig was in college at the time and his studies got in the way, so Balard finished off the discovery.

Report of fist arrest:

Balard discovered Bromine on July 3,1826 as an element in seawater. One year earlier, Lowig made a sample of Bromine over the summer, and presented it to his professor, and that is when studies got in the way.

Last seen:

Bromine is found in seawater. It is in the VIIA 17 and the halogen family. It is 35 on the periodic table.

Known assosiates:

Two other elements Bromine forms a compound with are Potassium, Ozone, other halogens, and Chlorine. Potassium and Bromine form a solid known as a medicinal salt, but alone they are liquids. Chlorine is also a liquid, and with Bromine it makes a toxic by inhalation and ingestion.

2K(s)+Br2(g)=KBr(s)

Warning Label:

Bromine in its pure form is dangerous.
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Caption:

Bromine is being used as a pool maintnence tool.

Citations:

http://www.webelements.com/bromine/history.html


http://www.findfast.org/science-element-bromine.htm


http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele035.html


http://www.chem4kids.com/files/elements/035_speak.html


http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/bromine/basics/facts.asp


https://www.google.com/search?q=Bohr+diagram+of+Bromine&biw=1440&bih=817&tbm=isch&imgil=1xCwhZIDSGK89M%253A%253BSK4fEROCMtl35M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.chemicalelements.com%25252Felements%25252Fbr.html&source=iu&pf=m&fir=1xCwhZIDSGK89M%253A%252CSK4fEROCMtl35M%252C_&usg=__-lE7suzg9TyY_iCTgB7hhtA_Ksg%3D&ved=0CCoQyjdqFQoTCIPb79DlmsgCFUgcPgodQ9gPsg&ei=UsEJVoPqGci4-AHDsL-QCw#imgrc=1xCwhZIDSGK89M%3A&usg=__-lE7suzg9TyY_iCTgB7hhtA_Ksg%3D



http://www.rsc.org/learn-chemistry/resource/rdc00000703/on-this-day-jul-03-discovery-of-bromine?cmpid=CDC00000703


https://www.webelements.com/potassium/chemistry.html


http://www.britannica.com/science/bromine


https://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=AwrB8psP7QlWXmAA4_WJzbkF;_ylu=X3oDMTBsZ29xY3ZzBHNlYwNzZWFyY2gEc2xrA2J1dHRvbg--;_ylc=X1MDOTYwNjI4NTcEX3IDMgRiY2sDZWVxaHBhNWIwOTZmcSUyNmIlM0QzJTI2cyUzRDltBGZyA3NmcARncHJpZANaMVp4emRWbFJydUFDUGlfWW0xZGVBBG10ZXN0aWQDbnVsbARuX3N1Z2cDMQRvcmlnaW4DaW1hZ2VzLnNlYXJjaC55YWhvby5jb20EcG9zAzAEcHFzdHIDBHBxc3RybAMEcXN0cmwDMTQEcXVlcnkDYnJvbWluZSBpbiB1c2UEdF9zdG1wAzE0NDM0OTExMTQEdnRlc3RpZANCMDkxNg--?gprid=Z1ZxzdVlRruACPi_Ym1deA&pvid=NI1XSjY5LjHnajlRVgSZ.gpBMjYwMgAAAAD1e6do&p=bromine+in+use&fr=sfp&fr2=sb-top-images.search.yahoo.com&ei=UTF-8&n=60&x=wrt#id=46&iurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.doheny.com%2Fblog%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2012%2F08%2FChlorineBromineTabs1.jpg&action=click


http://www.britannica.com/biography/Antoine-Jerome-Balard


Roza, Greg. Bromine. New York: Rosen Central, 2009. Print.


Roza, Greg. The Halogen Elements: Fluorine, Chlorine, Bromine, Iodine, Astatine. New York: Rosen Central, 2010. Print.