Whooping Cough

A vaccine Preventable Illness

IDENTIFICATION AND DEFINITION

Whooping cough (pertussis) is a very dangerous because it can have all the same symptoms as a normal cold. This bacterial disease is most dangerous for infants but cases can also be found in older populations, especially if they were not vaccinated when they were younger. Children should get 5 doses of DTaP 2 months, 4, 6, 15, and 18 months. Also 4 through 6 years of age. Td is a booster shot every 10 years for adults, but contains protection against pertussis. This is recommended especially for for pregnant mothers.


http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/pertussis/default.htm

HISTORY OF WHOOPING COUGH

Whooping cough had its first epidemic in Paris in 1578. It then got the name Pertussis which means "violent cough". The first vaccines came out in 1906 and whooping cough cases dropped dramatically. However, with people choosing to go without their vaccinations recently, cases have been on the rise.


http://www.austincc.edu/microbio/2993r/bp.htm

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF WHOOPING COUGH

Signs and symptoms of whooping cough can be very hard to detect, for they are very similar to those of a common cold. Things to look for:

  • Runny nose
  • sneezing
  • mild cough
  • fever
One way to tell separate a common cold from whooping cough is if these symptoms appear and the cough stays after 1 to 2 weeks and the cough worsens. Child may cough so hard their face changes color (reds and purples) and also the "whoop" noise will be more noticeable in some patients.


http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/lung/whooping_cough.html

TRANSMISSION OF WHOOPING COUGH

Whooping cough is a very contagious disease that should not be misunderstood as a child's disease. With it being bacterial, it can be transferred by coughing, sneezing, or simply being to close in proximity to someone who is contagious with the whooping cough.


http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/causes-transmission.html

COMPLICATIONS OF WHOOPING COUGH

The complications for an infant with whooping cough can be very serious. It can range from

  • pneumonia
  • slowed or stopped breathing
  • dehydration or weight loss
  • seizures
  • brain damage
Teens and adults can also have complications from whooping cough, however they tend to be more like side effects from strenuous coughing

  • bruised or cracked ribs
  • abdominal hernias
  • broken blood vessels

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/whooping-cough/basics/complications/con-20023295

RECOMMENENDED CONTROL MEASURE FOR WHOOPING COUGH

Vaccinations are very promoted by the CDC, they are said to be the best way to prevent the whooping cough among babies children, teens, and adults. They also recommend to not put yourself or your infant around infected people with whooping cough, there are antibiotics against pertussis, however a vaccination will put you in much better shape of never needing this antibiotic. The CDC also mentions that hygiene is important to protect yourself and others from the whooping cough


  • cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the waste basket.
  • do not cough or sneeze in your hand, use upper elbow
  • wash hands often, with soap



http://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/prevention/index.html