DMS Corral

By Darnell and Guerra 01/5/2016

Week At A Glance

Monday, January 4-

DMS breakfast

Staff returns; grade verification due by 10am

Jeans Day!


Tuesday, January 5-

Students return and receive new schedules in DMS café- 7:30 am

4th six weeks begins


Wednesday, January 6-

Reports cards go home


Thursday, January 7

Pep Rally 3:00

Fillys vs Lytle

Colts @ Lytle


Friday, January 8


Saturday, January 9

Colts @ Hondo Tournament

Welcome back!

Welcome back staff! Buckle in for a wild ride as the spring is always busy, busy, busy. We hope that you are well rested! Hopefully, you had a great holiday away from work- enjoying friends and family, catching up on your "zzz's", and getting ready for the next semester (mentally)!


We have a lot going on just in January- College- Go Get It! week kicks off next week, and we will also be benchmarking at the end of this month. Benchmarking information will be coming out soon!

Red Marbles (Something to think about)

I was at the corner grocery store buying some early potatoes. I noticed a small boy, delicate of bone and feature, ragged but clean, hungrily appraising a basket of freshly picked green peas.

I paid for my potatoes but was also drawn to the display of fresh green peas. I am a pushover for creamed peas and new potatoes.

Pondering the peas, I couldn't help overhearing the conversation between Mr.. Miller (the store owner) and the ragged boy next to me.

'Hello Barry, how are you today?'
'H'lo, Mr. Miller. Fine, thank ya. Jus' admirin' them peas. They sure look good..'
'They are good, Barry.. How's your Ma?'

'Fine. Gittin' stronger alla' time.'
'Good. Anything I can help you with?'

'No, Sir.
Jus' admirin' them peas.'
'Would you like to take some home?' asked Mr. Miller.

'No, Sir. Got nuthin' to pay for 'em with.'
'Well, what have you to trade me for some of those peas?'
'All I got's my prize marble here.'

'Is that right? Let me see it' said Miller.

'Here 'tis. She's a dandy.'
'I can see that. Hmm mmm, only thing is this one is blue and I sort of go for red. Do you have a red one like this at home?' the store owner asked..
'Not zackley but almost.'
'Tell you what. Take this sack of peas home with you and next trip this way let me look at that red marble'. Mr. Miller told the boy.
'Sure will. Thanks Mr. Miller.'

Mrs... Miller, who had been standing nearby, came over to help me.
With a smile she said, 'There are two other boys like him in our community, all three are in very poor circumstances.. Jim just loves to bargain with them for peas, apples, tomatoes, or whatever..

When they come back with their red marbles, and they always do, he decides he doesn't like red after all and he sends them home with a bag of produce for a green marble or an orange one, when they come on their next trip to the store.'

I left the store smiling to myself, impressed with this man. A short time later I moved to Colorado , but I never forgot the story of this man, the boys, and their bartering for marbles.

Several years went by, each more rapid than the previous one. Just recently I had occasion to visit some old friends in that Idaho community and while I was there learned that Mr. Miller had died. They were having his visitation that evening and knowing my friends wanted to go, I agreed to accompany them. Upon arrival at the mortuary we fell into line to meet the relatives of the deceased and to offer whatever words of comfort we could.

Ahead of us in line were three young men. One was in an army uniform and the other two wore nice haircuts, dark suits and white shirts...all very professional looking. They approached Mrs. Miller, standing composed and smiling by her husband's casket.

Each of the young men hugged her, kissed her on the cheek, spoke briefly with her and moved on to the casket. Her misty light blue eyes followed them as, one by one, each young man stopped briefly and placed his own warm hand over the cold pale hand in the casket. Each left the mortuary awkwardly, wiping his eyes...

Our turn came to meet Mrs. Miller. I told her who I was and reminded her of the story from those many years ago and what she had told me about her husband's bartering for marbles. With her eyes glistening, she took my hand and led me to the casket.

'Those three young men who just left were the boys I told you about.
They just told me how they appreciated the things Jim 'traded' them. Now, at last, when Jim could not change his mind about color or size.....they came to pay their debt.'

'We've never had a great deal of the wealth of this world,' she confided, 'but right now, Jim would consider himself the richest man in Idaho ..'

With loving gentleness she lifted the lifeless fingers of her deceased husband. Resting underneath were three exquisitely shined red marbles.

The Moral :
We will not be remembered by our words, but by our kind deeds. Life is not measured by the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath.

Remember,
IT'S NOT WHAT YOU GATHER, BUT WHAT YOU SCATTER THAT TELLS WHAT KIND OF LIFE YOU HAVE LIVED.

Kids can be trying this time of year. Before responding to them ask yourself, "What do I want he/she tto take from this encounter?"

How to Teach Multiplication by Teaching Art By Amanda Koonlaba

Exciting

“Come see this work,” she said with a huge smile on her face. I traveled down the hallway to the 3rd grade teacher’s classroom where she had a stack of student artwork ready for me to view.

“I am just really amazed at how well this lesson went. Even my lowest student got it. I mean, he really got it,” she bragged.

Demanding

We had planned this arts-integrated math lesson together. The students were learning about multiplying by multiples of ten in math class, and the teacher wanted the students to learn more about Cubism. So I created a presentation about Cubism. Since I teach visual art to these same students, I know what visual art background knowledge they have and what visual art skills they have been taught. I used this information to create a relevant presentation for the teacher to use in her math classroom.

To create the artwork, the students cut out shapes. Then, they traced at least one but no more than nine of each shape onto a piece of paper to create an image. Next, they collected data from their artwork. They created a tally chart of how many of each shape they used. Once they had the tally, they referred to a key that assigned a value to each shape. For instance, squares were assigned a value of 40. They had to multiply the value of each shape with the amount of times they had used that shape. If a student used a square 8 times in their artwork, he or she would multiply 8 and 40. Finally, students reflected on this process by describing their artwork. Here is the data recording sheet used by the students for this lesson

Engaging

A full two weeks after the teacher had taught this lesson, I was able to have some conversations with the students to gauge how they thought the project went. One student said he thought the project was fun. It made him feel proud and happy that “the principal told my mama about it. He called her while she was at church, and she told all her friends about how well I did.” He went on to say that, “I learned that even when you use ten shapes, instead of nine like the teacher said, that it is okay. Everything will be okay. You just get an even bigger number when you multiply.” I showed this student a photo that I’d taken of his work and asked him to explain the multiplication to me. He explained each of the equations he’d gotten by tallying his shapes and multiplying by a multiple of ten.

Another student said he thought that the project was “kinda hard, even though I liked it a lot.” He said it made him think harder than usual. “I had to find a way to make all these shapes fit together to make a picture. The parallelogram was hard to fit,” he explained. He went on to tell me that he learned some shapes that he didn’t know before, citing the parallelogram as one. “I don’t think I’ll ever forget what a parallelogram is,” he stated.

Finally, another student said she created a dog and a dog house with her shapes. She said she really likes dogs and enjoys reading about, drawing, and spending time with dogs. She explained that, “Cubism is interesting, because it has all these different shapes and colors. It makes me think of broken glass.” She said, “This project was fun, but we were still doing math. It was like fun-math.” She also explained that you could get the answer just by multiplying or by counting the shapes. She said that if you had four squares you could touch each one and count 40, 80, 120, 160 to get the answer.

Meaningful

The conversations that I had with these students offer evidence for how meaningful this project was to them. The student who was so proud that the principal had called his mom experienced a sincere, positive reward for his efforts. The reward did not cost anything and wasn’t tangible, but it meant something to the student. This is how intrinsic motivation is developed. This student also learned that it is okay to make mistakes. Even though he used too many of one shape, he discovered he could still multiply. He just took his learning a step beyond what the teacher had intended. He didn’t feel the need to start over on his artwork. He adapted what he was doing and moved on. Students need to develop this adaptive behavior to thrive in the world.

The student who admitted that the project was hard for him was able to articulate that he had to think harder than usual. He makes it clear that he had to work to get his product finished. This shows persistence and determination.

Finally, the student who said she was doing fun-math figured out how to count by multiples of ten and connected it to multiplication. She better understands the theory behind multiplication. The project was special to her because she was able to create an image of something related to her interests. The fact that these students could still explain the process to me after two weeks had passed definitely shows a high rate of retention for the concept.

Worthwhile

Art really does reach learners in a way that basic worksheets and common textbooks cannot. Art gives students the opportunity to construct something, to build something, or to create something. This lesson did all of those things but also taught the students the concept of multiplying by multiples of ten. When these students are formally assessed on this skill, they will think back to the time they created the artwork. They won’t be as likely to think back to the time they completed a worksheet.

We can think of using art in our regular classrooms as a superpower strategy to reach all of our students. Art is exciting, demanding, engaging, meaningful, and worthwhile. Why not add it to your arsenal of teaching methods?