Roof Styles

By: Danielle Ianni

Hip

A roof with the ends inclined, as well as the sides. This type of roof works well with prairie, cape cod, and ranch.
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Gambrel

Symmetrical two-sided roof with two slopes on each side. The upper slope is positioned at a shallow angle, while the lower slope is steep. You will most likely see this roof on ranch and dutch colonial houses.
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Mansard

A roof that has four sloping sides, each of which becomes steeper halfway down. Most oriental houses have this type of roof.
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Shed

A roof having a single slope. You will mainly see this roof on contemporary houses. Also, you might see it on modern houses.
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Flat

A roof that has no slopes. The most common houses for this roof style are art deco, mid century modern, Mediterranean, spanish, and pueblo revival.
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Saltbox

A frame house having up to three stories at the front and one fewer at the back with a steeply pitched roof. Ranch style, modern, and contemporary houses usually have this style roof.
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High Pitched Gable

A roof sloping downward in two parts at an angle from a central ridge, so as to leave a gable at each end. This style roof is usually found in craftsman, Italianate, and french provincial.
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Low Pitched Gable

A roof sloping downward in two parts at an angle from a central ridge, so as to leave a gable at each end. Log home, prairie, and ranch usually have this style roof.
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Dormers

A structural element of a building that protrudes from the plane of a sloping roof surface. A lot of houses have this style roof. These houses are federal colonial, victorian, Georgian colonial, Dutch colonial, and colonial.
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