A QUICK GUIDE TO BINARY

4 and 8 bit binary

The most basic form of binary is 4 bit. It looks like this:


| 8 | 4 | 2 | 1 |

------------------------ = 10 because 8 + 2 = 10

| 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 |


OR USING 8bit BINARY


| 128 | 64 | 32 | 16 | 8 | 4 | 2 | 1 |

------------------------------------------------ = 172 because 128 + 32 + 8 + 4= 172

| 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 0 |


When using binary '1' means on and '0' means off so on the 8bit binary if the number has a '1' (on) you use that number. If it is '0' (off) you do not use that number.


Adding binary together

When adding binary you can add it as you would a denary number like this:


| 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 |

---------------------------------------- = | 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | OR 175

| 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 1 | 0 | 1 |





Why do we have binary?

Computers process everything in binary. You can think of a computer processor as a bunch of miniature switches. They can be either on or they can be off. Most computers treat the switch being on as 1 and the switch being off as 0. When a switch is on, it puts an electrical current down a wire, when a switch is off it does not. The wires that are on at any given time are routed to various components in your computer causing them to perform a very small specific function. All of these wires turning on and off rapidly allow your computer to do all of the tasks that it does