Social and Emotional Aspects of Sex

Teen Sexuality by Katherine

Introduction

As an adolescence, you may be highly concerned about what the thoughts of other people are about you (Raising Emotionally Intellectual Teenagers, pg. 188). Questions may enter your mind like “What will my friends think of me? What will they say? What will they do?” (Raising Emotionally Intellectual teenagers, pg. 188).

Sex and Romantic Relationships


Sex is a difficult thing to talk about with members of the family, particularly when your gender is opposite you`re parent(s) (Raising Emotionally Intellectual Teenagers, pg. 190). “Teenagers in groups tend to overstate their sexual activity” (Raising Emotionally Intellectual Teenagers pg. 190.) So even if you have convinced yourself that everyone is having sex, this probably isn`t the case. One part of sexuality sometimes is romantic relationships. We must take into consideration that there are other factors that contribute to romance besides just romantic relationships (eBook, the development of romantic relationships on teenagers, pg. 2.) Early on a teen might romanticize about a celebrity or someone who is unavailable to them (eBook, the development of romantic relationships on teenagers, pg. 2.)


Parts of a Romantic Relationship and Expression of Sex

There are three parts to a romantic relationship: continual involvement/interaction with someone, its voluntary (at least in Western countries) both people in the relationship decide to be with someone and there is usually attraction sometimes sexual attraction (eBook, the development of romantic relationships on teenagers pg. 3.) But when asked the question “Do you have to be in Love to have sex?” (The Little Black Book for Girlz pg. 74) one possible answer you might adopt is “No Lots of people have sex when they aren`t in love. There`s nothing wrong with sexual expression; it’s part of who you are. The important thing about sex is that it should never be forced and should always be respectful” (The little Black Book for Girlz pg. 74.)


Sex Terms and Social Constructs of Sex

When talking socially with friends, there are many ways you might refer to sex including: “bouncing, doggy style, screwing, intercourse, get laid, getting me some, missionary, shagging or slipping in the back door” (The little Black Book for Girlz pg. 68). These are other words used to refer to sex that your friends might use in conversation. A wide range of behavioral scientists agree that emotions such as “anger, jealousy and content” protect the teenager from both undesirable relationships while protecting desirable relationships (eBook, the Development of romantic relationships on teenagers, pg. 21, 22.) Some scholars argue that emotions are cultural constructs meaning societies tell you when to feel what and when to act on it (The Development of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence). I argue that no one should tell you what to feel and when to feel what you feel and how to act. If you feel like having sex then have sex if you don’t then don`t but don’t let society dictate that for you. That’s just my thoughts.

Puberty and the Sex Brain

Change in puberty is partly responsible for when romantic feelings flourish (eBook, the Development of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence pg. 25). Romantic and Sexual desires set in at puberty (eBook The Development of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence pg. 25). Puberty is occurring five years earlier then years past (The Development of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence pg. 24.) This accounts for the feelings of the teenager feeling like they are in love but the onset of negative emotions plays a role in “frustration, disappointment and hurt” when a relationship does not turn out as intended (The Development of Romantic Relations in Adolescence Pg. 25, 26). Studies have found that boys and girls are different in their brain development when it comes to sex and it has to do with sexual maturity rather than age (New Cerebral Cortex Study Findings Have been Reported by Scientists at University of California. Science Letter 5 Apr 2011: 914. Student Resources in Context. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.) The “maturation of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortical gray matter”…”May contribute to differences in social and cognitive development during adolescence, and lasting sexual dimorphisms in the adult brain,” article says ("New Cerebral Cortex Study Findings Have been Reported by Scientists at University of California.” Science Letter 5 Apr 2011: 914. Student Resources in Context. Web. 2 Nov. 2014.) This means that sex affects your brain even into adulthood.

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Nicole Clark on CNN, discussing teen sexuality in the media
Gay Couples React to Anti-Gay Marriage Ads
Online Teen Crisis Survey Tyra (Tyra Banks Show)
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