how can turtles live so long?

by:Branden Torres

reproduction

"Another explanation is that the long lives of turtles and tortoises give them an evolutionary advantage that aids in effective reproduction. Wild turtles tend to live in harsh environments that aren't always conducive to breeding. Their long lifespans provide them with more opportunities to procreate. Turtles also have natural protection from predators in their tough shells and thick, armored skin, which, unlike animals that tend to be prey, gives them the luxury of being able to take their time reproducing."



Wild Turtles and tortoises live their lives in harsh dangerous places that our not fit or safe for breeding their young. But lucky for them, they have more opportunities to produce young because of their life span. Turtles and tortoises have a protective shell that is thick and armored skin, which helps and protects them from predators. It also gives them a relaxing time to reproduce without rushing so that they won’t get eaten. ("Why Do Turtles & Tortoises Live So Long?")

commentary

Wild Turtles and tortoises live their lives in harsh dangerous places that our not fit or safe for breeding their young. But lucky for them, they have more opportunities to produce young because of their life span. Turtles and tortoises have a protective shell that is thick and armored skin, which helps and protects them from predators. It also gives them a relaxing time to reproduce without rushing so that they won’t get eaten.

Life-span, diet and DNA


"Why do tortoises live so long? It is not uncommon for a giant tortoise to reach 150 years in age. Some have even suggested there is a Galapagos tortoise old enough to have met Charles Darwin. Darwin himself only lived for half as long - still rather longer than the average human of his day. Since the 1800s, improvements in lifestyle and medicine now mean that humans in developed nations live on average 20 years longer. Not quite tortoise potential.


Scientists have come up with some interesting ideas, which might cast light on why different species have different life-spans. One such theory relates to metabolism. Humans and other mammals have higher metabolic rates than their reptilian counterparts. We make all our own heat rather than absorbing it from the sun. As we breathe in the air around us, oxygen diffuses into our cells, fuelling the combustive process of respiration, the driving force behind our metabolism, growth and development.


While we make energy from food in this way, hazardous by-products are created that can damage our DNA, so-called reactive-oxygen species (ROS). The higher the metabolic rate, the greater the damage potential and the more likely our cells are to mutate and malfunction. Reptiles, like tortoises might be less susceptible to DNA damage caused by ROS, because they produce lower levels of these reactive chemicals.


We don't know how much DNA damage speeds up ageing or indeed how much it is relevant to the natural ageing process, but recent research suggests that knowing more about our genetic maintenance might improve our quality of life. There's no point in living as long as a tortoise if you're not fit enough to enjoy it."


since they move slow and steady and have lower levels to these reactive chemical so there most likely to live longer than humans because we have a higher rate which causes our cells to mutate and malfunction. ("Why Do Turtles & Tortoises Live So Long?")

commentary

since they move slow and steady and have lower levels to these reactive chemical so there most likely to live longer than humans because we have a higher rate which causes our cells to mutate and malfunction.

source information

"DNA Repair and Ageing." DNA Damage Response and Repair Mechanisms -. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 May 2015.

"Why Do Turtles & Tortoises Live So Long?" Animals. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 May 2015.