Epilepsy

By: Colleen G.--B2 Health

Informative

Epilepsy is a serious health condition that affects the brain and causes seizures. A seizure is the sudden attack of an illness, in this case the sudden attack of the epileptic brain seizure. It can also be called a convulsion, fit, or spasm. It is important to know about epilepsy because you may not know you have it, and think it is just from your personal disease (underlying medical condition). Also, if you have epilepsy but don't know it and just personally deal with your seizures, sudden death can occur from the lack of corrective treatment.

What is Epilepsy? What are seizures?

  1. It is a disorder of the brain that causes seizures, non-communicable
  2. There are many different types of seizures such as staring spells, or collapsing and convulsing. Some can also cause the patient to not know their surroundings, to vomit, and to urinate
  3. Some people that have epilepsy can have varied types of seizures, some only have 1 reoccurring type

Causes & Effects

  1. Some can occur from underlying medical conditions such as a brain tumor, head injury, a central nervous system issue, or diabetes.
  2. Other causes can include lack of oxygen to the brain, neurological disorders, and genetic disorders. Some are caused from a fever and don't cause harm in the future.
  3. If you don't manage your seizures, in extreme cases, it can lead to death

Statistics

  1. About 1.3% of people above age 18 have been diagnosed with epilepsy
  2. Only about 1% of the 1.3% of people have active epilepsy
  3. About 1% of people from ages 0-17 have epilepsy
  4. Only about 0.6% of people from ages 0-17 have active epilepsy

Lifestyle With Epilepsy

  1. Ways to treat Epilepsy are medicine, surgery, and other ways such as an electrical device implanted, a ketogenic diet, or nerve stimulation
  2. To help prevent epilepsy, you should have a healthy pregnancy (if pregnant), prevent brain injuries, exercise, and be up-to-date on vaccinations and doctors appointments.
  3. If you think you have epilepsy, talk to your health care professional or nurse after your first seizure so together, you can discuss options and find the cause
  4. You can manage epilepsy by taking your prescribed medicine, talk to your doctor or nurse when you have questions/concerns, recognize your seizure triggers, keep a record of your seizures, get enough sleep, and reduce stress levels
  5. Monitor possible triggers such as exercise, driving, and other activities and pull back if they set off seizures.

Works Cited

WEBSITES

  1. "Epilepsy Basics." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 11 June 2015.
  2. "Epilepsy Fast Facts." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 12 Mar. 2015. Web. 11 June 2015.
  3. "Managing Epilepsy." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 12 Mar. 2015. Web. 11 June 2015.
  4. "Preventing Epilepsy." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23 Sept. 2014. Web. 11 June 2015.
  5. "Frequently Asked Questions." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 18 Mar. 2015. Web. 11 June 2015.

IMAGES

  1. https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/80ciKzk-64tCgoGG5iSnmZ43MZKRdoOmlLUOwYuED2wZYPUMLLivXhPViQv23jt5_zkWQS_5cC68L7GwVddjb4p6p_Buz0nTyUnuieJCH3IdGb_-81W2WeMGotZNBqyVzA
  2. http://eftx.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/559907_489617937744922_1496103272_n.jpg
  3. http://livingwellwithepilepsy.com/wp-content/uploads/blogger/_E8vqQ--lvIQ/TDKCT1LkEUI/AAAAAAAAAFc/2sVtDr0iaGI/s1600/epilepsy.jpg