Heritage Middle SchooI

Ethan Hoff, Carson Krop, Sean Moser, Zack Rodick, Jake Hagen

Our school is based on the Project-Based Learning Program.

This means that instead of sitting at a desk and listening to a lecture, and then never actually seeing if you fully understand the project. With PBL, students will receive quick lesson, and then apply what they've learned. After doing so, teachers can see what students need to work on, and students can also analyze their own learning. After this, teachers can take the project and adjust the next lesson to better suit students, which in our vision statement, wanted more personalized lessons for students.

PBL makes teaching more enjoyable and rewarding.

Projects allow teachers to work more closely with active, engaged students doing high-quality, meaningful work, and in many cases to rediscover the joy of learning alongside their students.

PBL improves learning.

After completing a project, students understand content more deeply, remember what they learn and retain it longer than is often the case with traditional instruction. Because of this, students who gain content knowledge with PBL are better able to apply what they know and can do to new situations.

PBL builds skills for college, career, and life.

In the 21st century workplace and in college, success requires more than basic knowledge and skills. In a project, students learn how to take initiative and responsibility, build their confidence, solve problems, work in teams, communicate ideas, and manage themselves more effectively.

PBL addresses all school standards.

The Common Core and other present-day standards emphasize real-world application of knowledge and skills, and the development of success skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, collaboration, communication in a variety of media, and speaking and presentation skills. PBL is an effective way to meet these goals.

PBL provides kids opportunities to use technology.

Students are familiar with and enjoy using a variety of tech tools that are a perfect fit with PBL. With technology, teachers and students can not only find resources and information and create products, but also collaborate more effectively, and connect with experts, partners, and audiences around the world.

PBL also helps teachers by making teaching enjoyable and rewarding.

Projects allow teachers to work more closely with active, engaged students doing high-quality, meaningful work, and in many cases to rediscover the joy of learning alongside their students.
Project Based Learning: Explained.
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Want to learn more about PBL? Look Above!