Cryptosporidiosis

By: Timaura Jedele

Definition

The definition of Cryptosporidiosis is a parasitic disease made from the Cryptosporidium parasite. It embeds itself into the walls of your intestine and gives you diarrhea for three weeks or longer.

Causes and transmissions

Cryptosporidiosis can be caused by ingesting the Cryptosporidium cell by drinking or eating something that a contaminated person or animal has either eaten or drunk from, swimming in contaminated recreational water, eating uncooked food, touching your mouth with your hand, close contact with a sick person or animal, drinking recreational water and coming in contact with contaminated stool.

Symptoms

Some symptoms are abdominal pains and cramps, lack of water, upset stomach, vomiting, fever, losing or gaining weight more quickly than normal, diarrhea, lose of appetite, but there's the possibility that you might not have symptoms.

Treatment

Some treatment options are anti-retroviral, which is a drug that fights retroviruses, anti-diarrheal might slow down the diarrhea, drink a lot of water, some anti-parasitic drugs, which are made to treat parasitic diseases, and anti-motility agents, which are so the diarrhea isn't out of control, replacing the fluids, you might not need treatment because you can get rid of it yourself without any help, but it might not be curable.

Prevention

Some good tips on prevention are doing good hygiene, making your water drinkable, don't swim in recreational areas as much, handling baby animals carefully, avoid contact with contaminated stool, people and animals, and water, wash your hands after gardening and keep sick kids away from other kids who aren't sick so the healthy kids don't become unhealthy and you face a lawsuit from their parents.

Statistics

Some statistics are: There are around four hundred cases of Cryptosporidiosis in New York State in a year, 524 in the Netherlands, 3,230 cases in the U.K. in 2010, and in Germany three years were taken into account: year one: 584 cases, year two: 316 cases, year three: 333 cases, and in November 2010 about 27,000 people of Ostersund, Sweden were infected.

Cryptosporidiosis in the U.S.

In 2013, there was more then 1,200 people sick in Iowa due to unpasteurized apple cider. The bad thing about that was that people couldn't tell the difference between clean and unclean apple cider. Somewhere else in the U.S., eleven people complained about diarrhea that lasted longer than three weeks. There were two apple cider cases with that, but they strongly believe cider A was the cause of the outbreak since most of the sick people had drunk cider A, and when they tested it, it came back positive. In 2010, in the U.S., there was 8,591 confirmed cases of Cryptosporidiosis. They found women got it more then men. Children between the ages of one to nine and adults from the ages of twenty-five to twenty-nine got it more than any other age. In the U.S., there are 300,000 predicted cases of Cryptosporidiosis a year. In Colorado, there was a birthday party that made everyone who went sick. In Illinois, two brothers went to a private day camp and almost all the helpers complained of diarrhea afterwards. In South Carolina, there was 123 lab confirmed cases, and normally it's waterbourne, but when they tested the water it came back negative. In Wyoming, the same thing happened only with 34 cases. In Washington D.C., two cafeterias that had contaminated food, got a bunch of people sick, this time foodbourne. Finally, in the outbreak of Milwaukee, 403,000 people went unnoticed in the outbreak of 1993.

Bibliography

Works Cited

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