Borland C++

Operating systems Microsoft Windows, MS-DOS

WHAT IS C++ ?

Borland C++ is a C and C++ programming environment (that is, an integrated development environment) for MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows. It was the successor to Turbo C++, and included a better debugger, the Turbo Debugger, which was written in protected mode DOS.


Version History of BORLAND C++

  • Borland C++ 2.0 - (1991, MS-DOS)
  • Borland C++ 3.0 - (1991) New compiler support to build Microsoft Windows applications.
  • Borland C++ 3.1 - (1992) Introduction of Windows-based IDE and application frameworks (OWL 1.0, Turbovision 1.0)
  • Borland C++ 4.0 - (1993, Windows 3.x) MS-DOS IDE supported no longer, included OWL 2.0.
  • Borland C++ 1.0 - (1992, OS/2)
  • Borland C++ 1.5 - (?, OS/2)
  • Borland C++ 2.0 - (1993, OS/2) Support for 2.1 and Warp 3. OWL 2.0. Included IBM SMART Toolset for automatic migration of Windows applications to OS/2. Last version.
  • Borland C++ 4.01
  • Borland C++ 4.02 - (1994)
  • Borland C++ 4.5 - support windows 8 x86 without Dos box.
  • Borland C++ 4.51
  • Borland C++ 4.52 - (1995) Official support for Windows 95, OWL 2.5
  • Borland C++ 4.53
  • Borland C++ 5.0 - (1996, Windows 95) Released in March 1996. Works on Windows 95 and Windows NT 3.51. It does not (officially) work on Windows NT 4.0 (which was still in development at that time). 3rd party tests exhibited some problems on NT 4.0. It does not work in Windows 3.x or DOS. Despite that, it can produce either Win32, Win16 or DOS programs.
  • Borland C++ 5.01
  • Borland C++ 5.02 - (1997) Final independent release of the Borland C++ IDE (subsequently replaced up by the C++Builder series), final release to support compilation to (real-mode) MS-DOS target. Windows NT 4.0 officially supported.
  • Borland C++ Builder 4.0 + Borland C++ 5.02 - (1999) Bundle combination to facilitate the migration to C++Builder.
  • Borland C++ 5.5 - Command-line compiler only (not with IDE). It was later made available as a free download


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What can a C++ program do?

Typical programming tasks includes putting data into a database or pulling it out, displaying high speed graphics in a game or video, controlling electronic devices attached to the PC or even playing music and/or sound effects. You can even write software to generate music or help you compose.


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