Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Classroom Resources Brought to You by KET

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was an American clergyman, a Nobel laureate, and a prominent leader of the American civil rights movement who advocated nonviolent resistance to racial oppression. We celebrate his legacy each year on the third Monday in January. Following, please find classroom-ready digital media resources to aid your lessons and discussions on the topic of Civil Rights and Martin Luther King, Jr.


As always, please preview all digital content to make sure it is appropriate for your students and community.


Background Image Credit: PBS LearningMedia

Martin's Big Words

Martin's Big Words. Based on the classic children's book by Doreen Rappaport. Using quotes from some of his beloved speeches, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., comes to life in stunning collage art and vibrant watercolor paintings in this profound and important biography about beliefs and dreams and following one's heart. Martin Luther King, Jr., in his own words, will inspire and affect you, too. Narrated by Michael Clarke Duncan. Part of the Weston Woods Series.


Discovery Education. Video.

Grades K-2.

Martin Luther King Day | All About the Holidays

Martin Luther King Day | All About the Holidays. The third Monday in January is a national holiday observing the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. Learn more about this leader of the civil rights movement and about how we honor him today.


PBS LearningMedia. Video.

Grades K-5.

American Heroes: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

American Heroes: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. A combination of costumed re-enactments and archival footage of the civil rights movement shows how our country’s foremost civil rights leader transformed race relations in America. The program first shows young Martin as a child in Atlanta, where he experiences racial discrimination. The program explores major events in his life, and ends as Dr. King gives his “I Have a Dream” speech and as he receives the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.


Discovery Education. Video.

Grades 3-5.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day: America Celebrates

Martin Luther King Jr. Day: America Celebrates. Introduces Martin Luther King Jr. and explains his achievements as the foremost leader in America's civil rights movement. The program discusses King's childhood in Georgia, his education at Morehouse College, and his first years as a Baptist minister in Alabama. Photos and reenactments of the Montgomery bus boycott highlight King's leadership in the struggle to end segregation, and excerpts from the "I have a dream" speech demonstrate the power and inspiration his words still have on audiences today.


Discovery Education. Video

Grades 3-5.

Civil Rights Movement - Martin Luther King Jr. Board

Civil Rights Movement - Martin Luther King Jr. Board. View video, read excerpts of Dr. King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, and answer questions about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement.


Discovery Education. Board.

Grades 4-6.

Freedom: A History of Us - Let Freedom Ring

Come along on an exciting journey through Joy Hakim's story of freedom in America. Explore a webisode and see why the promise of freedom has attracted millions of people from all over the world to come to America. Hear for yourself why generations of men, women, and children have lived for, sacrificed for, and died for that freedom. It is a story that is still unfolding today. It is your story too.


Webisode 14: Let Freedom Ring - In the 1950s and early '60s a freedom movement emerges with the purpose of ending segregation and racism. It becomes the most effective social movement in U. S. history.


Teaching Guides


PBS Learning Media. Various Media Forms.

Grades 4-12.

Analyzing King's "I Have a Dream" Speech Lesson Plan

Analyzing King's "I Have a Dream" Speech Lesson Plan. Students study Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech and discuss the rhetorical influences on King's speech, the oratorical devices that King uses in delivering his speech and how a speech is similar to/different from other literary forms.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 6-12.

The March on Washington

The March on Washington. This year marks the 51st anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom and will be commemorated by teachers and students across the country and around the world. Help your students appreciate the significance of this event – and its role in the larger Civil Rights Movement using this collection of digital content from PBS LearningMedia. Includes video, documents, audio, lesson plans, and more.


PBS LearningMedia. Various Media Forms.

Grades 6-12.

Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders. Learn about the Freedom Riders, a courageous band of African American and white civil rights activists who in 1961 rode together on buses throughout the American South to challenge segregation. These video segments document the events and accomplishments of the Freedom Rides, and introduce you to the real human stories of those who helped change our history.


PBS LearningMedia. Videos.

Grades 6-12.

Excerpts from the March on Washington, Part 1

Excerpts from the March on Washington, Part 1.

The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech dominates popular history of the August 1963 March on Washington, but the day was full of speakers and performers. This audio compilation captures the voices of A. Philip Randolph, Ralph Abernathy, Roy Wilkins, Walter Reuther, Ralph Bunche, and Daisy Bates.


PBS LearningMedia. Audio.

Grades 6-12.

Civil Rights Collection

Civil Rights Collection. In 1954, the Supreme Court's landmark ruling in Brown v. Board of Education declared segregated schools unconstitutional and sparkeda decade of groundbreaking civil rights activism and legislation.Using archival news footage, primary sources, and interview segments filmed for Eyes on the Prize, this collection captures the voices,images, and events of the Civil Rights movement and the ongoing struggle for racial equality in America. Includes several lesson plans.


PBS LearningMedia. Various Media Forms.

Grades 6-12.

Project C: Lessons from the American Civil Rights Movement

Project C: Lessons from the American Civil Rights Movement. Join a group of student reporters to visit landmarks related to the Civil Rights Movement in commemoration of its 50th anniversary with these videos from Project C. Project C focuses on the role of citizenship in a democracy through the study of historical events related to the Civil Rights Movement. History is examined to teach the importance of civic engagement in support of a humane, civil and just society.


PBS LearningMedia. Video.

Grades 7-12.

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. The landmark four-part series The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow explores segregation from the end of the civil war to the dawn of the modern civil rights movement. It was a brutal and oppressive era in American history, but during this time, large numbers of African Americans and a corps of influential black leaders bravely fought against the status quo, amazingly acquiring for African Americans the opportunities of education, business, land ownership, and a true spirit of community.


PBS LearningMedia. Various Media Forms.

Grades 9-12.

The NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom

The NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, or NAACP, is America’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Founded in 1909, it was at the center of nearly every battle for the rights and dignity of African Americans in the twentieth century. Today, the NAACP honors its heritage of activism and continues to work for civil rights. This set of primary resources containing photographs and documents provides a window into this time period, as well as a Teacher's Guide with historical context and teaching suggestions.


PBS LearningMedia. Various Media Forms.

Grades 9-12.

Nonviolence and Peace Movements | Crash Course World History #228

Nonviolence and Peace Movements | Crash Course World History #228. Join host John Green to learn about nonviolence and peace movements in the 20th century. What is nonviolence? What is a peace movement? Traditionally, humans often resort to violence when they come into conflict. In the 20th century, it became much more common for people to enact change by means of nonviolence, and this was a common thread of connection between many of the most notable advocates of peaceful change. Crash Course will take you along a path of nonviolent resistance and peaceful change including Gandhi, Gregg, Bayard Rustin, Martin Luther King, Jr., the Cold War , and the Arab Spring.


PBS LearningMedia. Video.

Grades 9-13+

Big image