The collapse of Iceland

By: Russell Walker and Collin Molano

Thesis

Although Iceland suffered severe volcanic activity, flooding, and winds that led to heavy erosion, they corrected their destructive ways by switching from an agricultural base to a fishing economy.
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Environmental issues facing Iceland

Iceland lies in the North Atlantic Ocean about 600 miles west of Norway. Iceland has been facing soil erosion problems for many years, the government has intervened and has begun to replace some of the lost soil. The loss of soil has been greatly related to the over farming of the land. When settlers arrived in Iceland, it was lush and green, but they had to use the grass to feed their animals. After much of the vegetation was eaten up, the soil became very loose. It began to get blown around and made the land almost completely unusable. After this, the soil dried up and began to get blown around, creating the largest desert in all of Europe. The scene in Iceland is often compared to that of the surface of the moon because of its vast expanses of blackish gray sand. The local inhabitants could no longer get their food supply from farming the land, so they turned their attention to the resource that surrounded the island nation completely.
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Growth of fishing in Iceland

After the arable land in Iceland all but dissipated, the local inhabitants turned their attention to the sea. They realized that they could not survive off of farming and concluded that fishing was a good way to create food and a good product to trade with. This was key to their survival because if they had continued farming their people would have died out abruptly and it would have been the end for Iceland. There was a large abundance of fish in the sea and Iceland used this to their advantage. Iceland's economy revolves largely around its exports. 34.1% of all of Exported goods from Iceland are seafood products. The second most exported good is wrought aluminium.
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Did Iceland Collapse?

There is a complex desion to be made in the fact that did Iceland really collapse. After doing the research we have come to the conclusion that Iceland did not collapse. Althought Iceland underwent many hardships and times were it looked as if they were to collapse, they were able to adapt to their mistakes and make the changes that were needed. They had noticed that they were making the land unfarmable and with the large floods facing Iceland much of its soil was alway been pushed away. It is clear that they noticed their mistakes and that is why they moved on to fishing. In conclusion our group decided that Iceland did not collapse due to awarness of their suroundings.
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Works Cited

Works Cited

Diamond, Jared M. Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed. New York: Viking, 2005. Print.

Johansen, Bruce E. "Marine Life, Fisheries, and Global Warming." Issues: Understanding Controversy and Society. ABC-CLIO, 2006. Web. 12 Mar. 2014. <http://issues.abc-clio.com/Search/Results?q=1754480>.

Maksimov, Boris. "Rolling Back Iceland's Big Desert." BBC News. BBC, 08 Feb. 2005. Web. 14 Mar. 2014. This source is reliable for our group and the info we need. This journal was posted into the BBC News. The BBC News is a reliable news source based on their credibility and and published authors.
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