The 5 Main Causes of World War I

Calvin Kerfoot

M-A-N-I-A

Militarism

Alliances

Nationalism

Imperialism

Assassination of Archduke Ferdinand

Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Gavrilo Princip shot Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, on June 18, 1914. They were shot in Sarajevo, Bosnia. The dispute was that Ferdinand was about to get a high ranking in the Austria-Hungary government and trying to take over Serbia. Serbia was mad, so Princip just shot him. Austria-Hungary was mad, so they went to war with Serbia. Case closed.

Imperialism

—a policy of extending a country's power and influence through diplomacy or military force

Countries would try to extend all power through military and diplomacy force, so they would attack other countries to send a message that "We're the best country and you better stay away and not fight," or something like that.

Nationalism

—political independence

Nationalism is political independence, so they don't have any allies. With no allies, the country is weak. That makes them an easy target for war, because they only have their own country to back them up and no one else. Everyone needs allies, no matter the military strength, country size, or government strength.

Alliances

—countries that help other countries in the concept of war

All of the alliances, or most of them, were entangled. Because of this, if one country went to war, then gradually every country would be in war. This would wreak havoc everywhere around the world.

Militarism

—the strategy that a country must have a strong military first, and worry about other important things later

Militarism could be based on imperialism a little bit. The cartoon to the left basically says that terrorists are not allowed to kill people, but the military would be [but would have to declare war]. If you think about it, both scenarios have the death of people and random acts of war or terror. Point made.