The Downfall of Macbeth

Who Caused Macbeth's Downfall?

Who started it all?

The ones who started Macbeth’s downfall are the witches. They started his downfall because they are the ones who gave him the idea of being king in the first place. In the book Macbeth, there is a line that the First Witch says; “All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Glamis!” (Shakespeare 17). This quote states everyone who lives in Cawdor will hail Macbeth. Currently, the witches are stating who will hail to Macbeth, telling him he will be the King. Next, the Second Witch says; “All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor!” (Shakespeare 17). This quote from Shakespeare explains that everyone who lives in Cawdor will hail and bow to Macbeth. Last, the Third Witch says; “All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be King hereafter!” (Shakespeare 19). The quote by the Third Witch states that Macbeth will truly be King. These witches are giving ambition to Macbeth about becoming the King. The witches are telling him, giving him lust to be the King, and so he starts thinking about it more and more, and it soon turns to ambition. The ambition he would gruesomely kill to have. Macbeth, if not had been told by the witches, would still be in obeying of the old king before himself. He would be serving proudly- without wicked thought of murder. These witches let Macbeth have the spark of lust witch sent him down a road of killing to be King- and to stay King.


Literary Devices in Macbeth

SIMILE: “Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world

Like a Colossus...”


Setting: In the beginning of the book, the setting is with the three witches at "a wild and lonely place in medieval Scotland" (Macbeth 7).


Characterization: When Macbeth sees the dagger and has a process of thinking of the murder he is about to do.

Literary Device #1

This device is a simile. A simile is a sentence with like, as, or than. A quote that is in "Macbeth" has a simile because it has the word "like". This quote is: "Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus"(http://resources.mhs.vic.edu.au/macbeth/theplay/devices.html).

Without this simile, there would be no comparison. Without a comparison, there may be some confusion on what is going on in the book because there will be a hunk of information that is left out of the book.

Literary Device #2

This device is a setting. A setting gives imagery to the story, making the story more comprehensible to read. At the beginning of the book, the setting is: at "a wild and lonely place in medieval Scotland" (Macbeth 7). Without this information, the book may be confusing.

Literary Device #3

For this device, it is characterization. When Macbeth was about to murder for the first time, he spoke his feelings and it showed his character. The text says: "Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee! I have thee not, and yet I see the still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible to feeling as to sight? or art thou but a dagger of the mu=ind, a false creation proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain? I see thee yet, in form as palpable as this which I now draw" (Macbeth 51).

With this information, it also includes tone, but more so characterization. The character in which Macbeth is and how he is feeling when he is on the verge of murder.

HEY YOU

During the downfall Macbeth experiences a spot in which he goes though a type of depression- or anxiety. When he first kills the former King, he feels like the King will get revenge. He feels regret- and wishes, deep down, he never did the murder. Hey You by Pink Floyd is a good comparison in which he feels as if he misses his formal self. Lyric chunk:

Hey You- Pink Floyd

Hey you, out there on the road
Always doing what you're told,
Can you help me?
Hey you, out there beyond the wall,
Breaking bottles in the hall,
Can you help me?
Hey you, don't tell me there's no hope at all
Together we stand, divided we fall.

Pink Floyd - "Hey You" - YouTube