Afirca - Aparthied

By: Amaraldo & Brenner

History of Aparthied

With the enactment of apartheid laws in 1948, racial discrimination was institutionalized. Race laws touched every aspect of social life, including a prohibition of marriage between non-whites and whites, and the sanctioning of ``white-only'' jobs. In 1950, the Population Registration Act required that all South Africans be racially classified into one of three categories: white, black (African), or colored (of mixed decent). The coloured category included major subgroups of Indians and Asians. All blacks were required to carry ``pass books'' containing fingerprints, photo and information on access to non-black areas.

In 1951, the Bantu Authorities Act established a basis for ethnic government in African reserves, known as ``homelands.'' These homelands were independent states to which each African was assigned by the government according to the record of origin (which was frequently inaccurate). All political rights, including voting, held by an African were restricted to the designated homeland. The idea was that they would be citizens of the homeland, losing their citizenship in South Africa and any right of involvement with the South African Parliament which held complete hegemony over the homelands.

(http://www-cs-students.stanford.edu/~cale/cs201/apartheid.hist.html)

Solutions to the Problem

The Apartheid could have been solved faster and sooner if other countries had helped the natives of South Africa. Also, if the natives had seen their rights being slowly taken, then they would've been faster to resist white rule than. As it was, the situation was ended thanks to Nelson Mandela and other brave people who wanted freedom.

(http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1993/mandela-bio.html)