WWI By : Edwin Umanzor

1914-1918

Building the army

I'm for the world war I. The USA built an army by drafting as many men possible. Jobs were desperate for workers so they hired women to work too.





cited page :"Prologue: Selected Articles." National Archives and Records Administration. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014.

War Economy

The total cost of World War I to the United States (was) approximately $32 billion, or 52 percent of gross national product at the time. When the war began the US was in recession. Other countries starting buying goods, so that helped a lot.







cited page : "The Economics of World War I." The Economics of World War I. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014.

Resistance to the draft

The WWI draft is part of the selective service act of 1917. It forced all eligible men to join the military.The WWI draft is part of the selective service act of 1917. It forced all eligible men to join the military. Some people did not like the fact that young boys had to join the army at such a young age. Others thought it was necessary for The US.





Cited page: "Search the History Learning Site." History Learning Site. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014.

Big image

Woman Working

Some woman were part of the armies. Most worked as workers. They served food , took care of the soldiers. Many joined committees to grow bigger and it'll be better for the US. Thousands served as nurses. Many also, worked in factories.




Cited page : "Women in the Progressive Era." Women in the Progressive Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014.

Big image

Prejudice against German Americans

German-Americans often encountered persecution, with the result that many "Americanized" the spellings, forms and pronunciation of their names (such as "Schmidt" into "Smith" or Lüchow's [a New York restaurant] into Luchow's) in order to better assimilate.During this period of ethnic tension, German language instruction was dropped from many high schools, and in some cases German books were removed from public libraries and even burned. German-Americans, who still often spoke German within their communities and churches, were forbidden from speaking German to each other on the "party line" telephones of the day, so the English-speaking operators could listen to their conversations.




Cited page : "FAST-US-1 Intro to American English Reference File." FAST-US-1 Intro to American English Reference File. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014.

Espionage Act

in 1917 some two months after America's formal entrance into world war 1 against Germany, the United States Congress passes the Espionage Act. Espionage Act essentially made it a crime for any person to convey information intended to interfere with the U.S. armed forces prosecution of the war effort or to promote the success of the country's enemies. Anyone found guilty of such acts would be subject to a fine of $10,000 and a prison sentence of 20 years.




Cited page: "U.S. Congress Passes Espionage Act." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014.

Big image