She's the Twelfth Man

Kelli Horton and Braytie Neaves

Purpose of the Smore:

This Smore is to compare and contrast the differences and similarities between the movie "She's the Man" and the Shakespearean play "Twelfth Man". We will use pictures and textual evidence to help visualize the differences from the two pieces. This Smore will also include the types of comedy that are used in both the movie and the play.

Twelfth Night

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She's the Man

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Similarities

1. Something that both the play and the movie have in common is that Viola pretends to be a man. In the movie "She's the Man", Viola is pretending to be a boy in a high school called Illyria to prove a point that girls can play soccer as good as the boys can and that she can make the team disguised as a boy. In the play, "Twelfth Night", Viola is pretending to be a man because she lost her brother due to a shipwreck and needed a way to provide for herself. A captain from the ship told Viola, "Be you [Duke Orsino's] eunuch, and your mute I'll be: When my tongue blabs, the let mine eyes not see" (pg 6).


2. In both the movie "She's the Man" and in the play "Twelfth Night" Duke Orsino sends Viola to talk to Olivia for him so that they can be together. In the movie, Duke and Olivia make a deal that if "Sebastian" can help him get Oliva that Duke will help him make the soccer team. In the play, Duke Orsino sends "Cesario" to Olivia's house to go tell her that he is in love with her. He tells Cesario "O, then unfold the passion of my love, Surprise her with discourse of my dear faith: It whall become thee well to act my woes; She will attend it better in thy youth Than in a nuncio's of more grave aspect" (pg. 8).


3. Another thing that is similar about both the play and the movie is the love triangle between Duke Orsino, Olivia, and Viola. In the movie "She's the Man", Olivia falls for Viola who is pretending to be her brother Sebastian because he is kind to her and he doesn't treat her like all of the other boys. In the play "Twelfth Night" Olivia falls for Viola who is pretending the be the Dukes eunuch and calls himself Cesario. When "Cesario" comes to her house to tell her that the Duke is in love with him, and he is kind to her and tells her how beautiful she is. Viola (Cesario) realizes that Olivia has fallen for her when Malvolio comes to return the ring. Viola says "What will become of this? As I am man, My state is desperate for my masters love; As I am woman,-now alas the day!" (pg 14).

Differences

1. One difference between the play and the movie is that In the movie "She's the Man" Viola pretends to take her twin brother, Sebastian's place at high school while he is away on a band tour in Europe. In the play "Twelfth Night" Viola pretends to be a made up man named Cesario because she fears that her brother has drowned in the shipwreck and needs to provide for herself. She is a servant to Duke Orsino. Duke Orsiono says "Whos saw Cesario, ho?" And Viola replied "On your attendance, my lord; here" (pg. 8).


2. Another difference between the play and the movie is that in the movie, Sebastian is misunderstood to be Viola during the soccer tournament. In the play, Sebastian is mistaken to be Viola during a duel with Sir Toby. When Sir Toby challenges Sebastian to a duel he is very confused because he doesn't know they guy. He says "Why, There's for thee, and there, and there. Are all the people mad?" (pg. 31).


3. Another difference between the movie and the play is that in the movie, Olivia has a plan to make "Sebastian" jealous by pretending to like Duke Orsino in hopes that "Sebastian" will fall for her. In the play, Sir Andrew who wants Olivia tries to make Olivia jealous by challenging Cesario to a duel so that Olivia will fall for him instead of Cesario. Sir Andrew writes a letter to Cesario challenging him to a duel saying "Thou comest to the lady Olivia, and in my sight she uses thee kindly: but thou liest in thy throat; that is not the matter I challenge thee for" (pg 27).

Comedy Ladder

Low Comedy:

"She's the Man"- Low comedy was used in the movie when after soccer practice all the boys had to go take a shower and Viola couldn't because she is a girl and obviously she would be revealed.


"Twelfth Night"- Low comedy was used in Twelfth Night when Olivia saw Cesario and took of her veil. Back in the medieval times taking off the veil was sexual and meant you were ready to get back on the market.

Farce:

"She's the Man"- A misunderstanding that happened in the movie is when Olivia thought that she was kissing the Viola Sebastian but she was actually kissing the real Sebastian and it was humorous to see how confused the real Sebastian was.


"Twelfth Night"- In the play a misunderstanding that happened was when Olivia went up to who she thought was Cesario but was actually her twin brother Sebastian who had just showed up to Illyria and he was very pleased to have a woman be all over him. Sebastian says "What relish is in this? how runds the stream? Or I am mad, or else this is a dream: Let fancy still my sense in Lethe steep; If it be thus to dream, still let me sleep!" (pg 31).

Comedy of Manners:

"She's the Man"- In the movie, comedy of manners was used when Justin tells Viola "Could you just be a girl for five seconds" because she is so tomboy like.


"Twelfth Night"- In the play, comedy of manners was used when Maria, Clown, and Sir Toby played a prank on Malvolio. Maria planned to give a love letter to Malvolio pretending to be Olivia. She said, " Sport royal, I warrant you: I know my physic will work with him. I will plant you two, and let the fool make a third, where he shall find the letter: observe his construction of it. For this night, to bed, and dream on the event. Farewell.'' (pg 16).

Comedy of Ideas:

"She's the Man"- Comedy of ideas was used when Illyria beat Cornwall in the Soccer tournament and Viola was right when she said a girl could be on the team.


"Twelfth Night"- Comedy of ideas was used when the Duke still fell in love with Cesario when he didn't even know that she was a girl yet.