The Learning and Development Center

The Center for Excellence

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Access New Professional Skills at the Learning and Development Center

A division of HR

In this Issue

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Featuring Carlecia D. Wright, Director of the Office of Business Opportunity

This interview with Carlecia D. Wright, Director of the Office of Business Opportunity of the City of Houston, was conducted and condensed by Mahogany Johnson.

MMJ: What is your vision for the future of your department?


CW: My vision is to go next level for our businesses. The City of Houston for the last five years has been able to expand our services and improve our customer service. We’ve developed new programs for businesses and the idea or the concept of going to the next level. We have to question what can we do more of, or how we can have a greater impact. We have 2,600 companies that are certified to do business, including minority, women and small businesses. We have over 2,000 Hire Houston First companies, and the city has many projects underway.


For the businesses that we serve, we need to step up to the next level and ask how we can help them engage in the billions of dollars in opportunities around Houston. Some of the things that we’re looking to do is expand our capacity building services. We have all of these projects that are happening in and around the City of Houston, how can we ensure that our companies are prepared to do the work? How can we ensure that we keep as much of our dollars in Houston as possible? What we’ve found is that the more money our local businesses make, the more they support the economy, and the more they hire individuals from Houston. Capacity building is going to be a major component of our next strategic plan. We’re just wrapping up a five year strategic plan that was launched in 2011. Going into 2016, we‘re going to have to look at how we can develop our businesses. It’s a huge undertaking, but we want to do things better. Houston is a market where there is a great deal of programs and services that service minorities, women, and businesses. The City of Houston is in a unique position because we have the largest breath in terms of connecting with businesses. We have credibility because we are the city, but we don’t want to do something just to do it, we want to do it better and if we can’t do it better we want to rely on a partner or someone else to provide that service. We’re looking to make things better and to build capacity of our businesses. We aim to improve on quality of services, and not be complacent in where we are now.



MMJ: What are a few highlights of the latest projects OBO has implemented to help ensure small business participation in the city’s procurement process?


CW: Hire Houston First is a unique and interesting program. It is the brainchild of Mayor Annise Parker and a program that she was very committed to doing. It’s about keeping our dollars local. What we found with Hire Houston First is that it’s received a tremendous response. In less than four years we’ve received over two dozen companies that are designated as Hire Houston First. What we’ve found is that the City of Houston has awarded most of its dollars to local companies, and the idea or concept of Hire Houston First when it was first in its implementation stages received criticism because there was an expectation that the city was actually going to have to pay more, and what we’ve found is that we haven’t had to leverage the designation. We’re able to track information about performance of Hire Houston First companies, but they’ve been competitive, they haven’t had to leverage the designation. When our businesses are betting on projects, they’re giving us the best price and to me that’s a tremendous success.


I’m very excited about Liftoff Houston. We are in our third year, we’ve gone through kinks and its’ constantly evolving. We have a longstanding commitment from Capital One Bank, which is one of our partners and a former champion community partner. Liftoff Houston was one of our ways to engage a group of businesses that had been reaching out to the department for years through the One Stop Business Center, which is now the Office of Business Opportunity. They’d been looking for resources and looking to start their businesses. The program was created based on a demand. We’ve had anywhere from 6,000 to 8,000 individuals contact our Office of Business Opportunity Solution Center each year. People are looking for money to finance their companies. They’re looking for ways to start their businesses and Liftoff Houston gives us a formal structure. We facilitate workshops and work with partners like SCORE (Service Corps Of Retired Executives). We also teach entrepreneurs about financing their business and we educate them on their personal finances. A lot of people don’t understand that their personal finances impact their business finances, and we educate them. We provide them with mentorship, as well as SCORE, and Capital One Bank, our banking partner. Not only do they fully fund 30,000 dollars in cash prizes, they also provide coaching so that businesses or individual entrepreneurs can be prepared.


We’re very excited, and we have a pitch day that’s approaching in November where businesses will pitch their ideas. We usually get about three or four hundred individuals that go through our workshops and classes. Not all of those individuals complete the entire program, but the fact that it’s a resource for them is tremendous. This program is a great asset, and it’s really given exposure, and it’s been foundational for us to launch other programs. This year we launched something called Kauffman New Venture, which was a ten week training program similar to Liftoff Houston with a very rigorous business plan development that was facilitated internally by our deputy director. One of the programs that I’m really excited about is a virtual legal application, and we’ve done that in Partnership with Vinson & Elkins, a major law firm here in Houston. We’re providing pro bono legal services as 30 minute sessions to entrepreneurs.


We just piloted the program and we’re conducting sessions once a month, but the demand has been tremendous. Today is our first day of the launch and we’ve filled all of the slots for businesses to receive free legal services. The way it will work is that Vinson & Elkins has sponsored a legal lab that is located on our floor at 611 Walker. It’s a confidential space, and our businesses will be able to actually talk, virtually, face-to-face with an experienced attorney on some of their issues and business matters. We’re very excited about our latest initiative and we just completed a press conference two weeks ago. Our deputy director has a legal background and wanted to figure out a way to address some of the issues she had seen so that we could formally provide legal services.



MMJ: As the Director of OBO, facilitating a diverse working environment for Houston’s robust business community is a key aspect of your role. What have you done to further your knowledge about diversity? What strategies have you used to address diversity challenges? What were the positives and negatives?


CW: As the Director, I audit the private sector to look at what strategies they employ in their supplier diversity programs. Comparatively speaking, the City of Houston is getting a good grade. I also look at other city programs to see what they’re doing and how they’re approaching the supplier diversity perspective. I’m constantly reading articles, as a matter of fact, the U.N. just released a report identifying the top 15 sustainability factors, and the report addresses issues such as women and equality, as well as breaking cycles of poverty. I’m constantly reading and educating myself to understand people’s viewpoints on diversity. I was a panelist for the World Global Leadership Council and spoke about matters of diversity and inclusion. I felt like a lone sheep, because I held some fundamentally different viewpoints from the other individuals on the panel.


I try to walk the walk and not just talk the talk in terms of holding our diverse businesses accountable. When you’re doing business with a government entity like the City of Houston, the first thing you need to do is manage your expectations and your expectations are based on what you’re able to deliver. I’m thinking about the impact that we have in this program and at the end of the day, if the City of Houston’s biggest value is competitiveness, then you have to be competitive. If you’re not competitive, then let me manage your expectation, and you may not be the right business for the City of Houston. I push people to be transparent and to know our value, which is to stay competitive. If you can be competitive, then there’s a place for you on our supply chain.



MMJ: How do you get people on your team to live your leadership philosophy?


CW: I give them space to be their own leaders and harness their own leadership. I lead with intention. By me leading with intention, people are different, and I think that my staff have an opportunity to implement their own ideas. We breed innovation like the Legal Lab, Liftoff Houston, and the new programs that we’ve been able to launch. I would be lying if I said I’ve done it by myself. The Office of Business Opportunity is full of leaders and influencers. Organizations have positive influencers and they have negative deviants. At the end of the day, as a leader you have to make people accountable but also let them own their space. Ultimately as Director, I am accountable but I do put some of the responsibility on my team. I let them celebrate the wins and receive credit for the wins and I promote my staff in a way that what they do and the value that they bring is rewarded through praise and recognition.



MMJ: What advice would you give to budding professionals seeking mentorship and what qualities do you look for in a potential mentee?


CW: From my mentorship perspective, what’s worked for me is that I’m naturally a coach. A person has to be optimistic in order for me to connect with them. They have to be optimistic about their opportunities, and they have to know that they can own a bigger space. I’m into positive people and positive outcomes. I’m really into that type of thing.


Until recently I hadn’t had many mentors. In hindsight, I’m not sure why I wasn’t able to make that connection. I think the underlying factor has been competition. It can be frustrating when people think that you are in a competitive space or you’re potentially a competitor, even in the peer role. I feel like the best mentorships that I’ve had were from my friends. We’ve been in different spaces and we don’t have a need to compete with each other. In the last year, I have met three women that totally think different.


They’ve added tremendous value in a way that I wasn’t expecting, so it’s amazing when you do find someone that is willing to take the time to be thoughtful and help you get to personal wellness and awareness of self. I don’t know if it’s innate or a gene that some people have, but I wasn’t encountering those people up until a year ago and it’s disappointing. If a young woman wants to connect with me, then I’m going to be the person that you can connect to because that’s something I’ve committed to doing. I always tell people that they have to connect with their inner mentor. You have an inner critic that tells you all the things you can’t do and how awful you are. I say, until a person actually finds that mentor, they’ve got to mentor themselves and celebrate how awesome they are. The advice that I give to individuals is to set expectations of yourself when you’re asking someone to mentor you, but don’t get disappointed if there’s not a connection and in the meantime you’ll find your inner mentor, because you know ultimately which direction you want to go in more than anyone else.


I have read at least a dozen books, including The Women Code, Lean In, Playing Big, and a bevy of other leadership books that I recommend women to read.



MMJ: What are, from your perspective, the biggest challenges for women in leadership roles?


CW: I feel like we are held to different standards. I think one of the biggest challenges is that leadership should mean one thing, but I think that people in general hold different expectations for women, including women. Men and women are different, and there are different expectations, and that can be frustrating at times. I think the City has a great atmosphere to illustrate the talents of women. Especially amongst my colleagues they’ve done some amazing things in this city and they’ve taken their departments to the next level, that goes for our men directors as well (laughs). One of my colleagues that has really been an inspiration is Dr. Rhea Lawson, director of the Houston Public Library (HPL) system, she’s been able to implement some amazing programs. In fact, Liftoff Houston is in collaboration with the Houston Public Library. She’s been able to be the brainchild of amazing things at HPL. Our Municipal Courts department, led by Director Barbara Hartle, her work has also been next level with the implementation of C-Smart.



MMJ: Can you speak a little bit about harnessing your personal power to make impact, and why it's critical for effective leadership?


CW: I was on a diversity and inclusion panel for the World Global Leadership Council, which is an oil and gas organization. It was really exciting to be a part of that panel because I’m not in the oil and gas industry. It was great exposure for me and we discussed leadership values. One of the things is that I didn’t start from a leadership perspective because I had my first leadership position more than 15 years ago. It was my first paid leadership position where I was leading a group of young men and women and I very early on had to learn was how to establish a vision. I admit it’s not something that I started with but as I progressed in my career, I’ve evolved and grown and learned what my strengths and weaknesses were.


One of the things that I’ve really focused on is intention and the power of intent. I want to lead with intention. The questions that I ask myself when I’m making tough decisions and when I’m dealing with day-today staff issues or establishing a strategic plan is what type of impact will what we’re doing have on the brand? Who will it impact? What impact do we anticipate and what do we want to happen? Being able to answer those questions really helps take our staff to the next level because we’re a government, and when we make a decision in our particular space, we have a variety of different customers in our department. We have city departments, conglomerate corporations and small businesses, which are our target audience, and then I have my staff, colleagues and Mayor Annise Parker as a customer. If there is a gap between what I intend to do and the impact it has then I’m missing something. As earlier stated, leading with intention is important to me and I measure or define that by defining the impact of my decisions. Particularly, when I’m making organization changes, I think about the impact that it will have not just to the managers, but to the line staff and the customers that we serve.

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Administrative Development Program (ADP)

What areas of your job do you find most difficult or want to improve? Come and experience our newly redesigned Administrative Development Program (ADP) that will equip you with the tools, techniques, and behavioral skills you need to maximize your success! If you are looking to improve your skills in communication, technology, professionalism, and other areas, then this is the program for you.


New Administrative Development Program (ADP) courses begin Monday, January 25, 2016 and run through Monday, May 16, 2016.


ADP courses are held weekly every Monday, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023


ADP (formerly Administrative Skills Certificate Program), is our multi-track program consisting of 16 sessions designed to enhance and empower administrative effectiveness and efficiency.


ADP Commitment:

Requests for academic accommodations are to be made during the first week of the program, except for extenuating circumstances.

  • All courses in ADP are mandatory for completion of the program.
  • We will permit those in current programs and provide exceptions related to Mayor calls, bereavement, or other tragedies that may impede attendance.


All registration requests can be sent to Bonnie.Sandberg@houstontx.gov

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Safety Fundamentals for Supervisors

Wednesday, Jan. 6th 2016 at 8am

Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023

This free course will help supervisors understand risk management, HR safety and workers' compensation practices, including hands-on activities and innovative guest speakers.


You will learn:

Hazard recognition

Injury costs and prevention

Safety A. P.'s

Workplace ergonomics

Accident reporting procedures

Check Out Our Latest Course Offering(s):

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Word 2010 - Level 1

Tuesday, Jan. 12th 2016 at 8:30am-4:30pm

Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023

Are you getting frustrated with learning Word? Do you use Word regularly but wish you knew more shortcuts and other features? In this course you will learn to identify the parts of the Word window, create, save, and reopen Word documents, modify documents by editing text, apply different formatting techniques, create labels and envelopes.


Instructor Led: Dawn Janis

Price: $35.00

Manager Approval Required: Yes

http://talent.houstontx.gov/Saba/Web/COH/goto/GuestOfferingDetails?offeringId=class000000000022461&isFromDeeplink=true

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Plan Your Day to Save Time

Wednesday, Jan. 20th 2016 at 8:30am-12:30pm

Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023

Are you continually looking through stacks of papers? Do you find procrastination is a problem sometimes? Are you struggling with getting everything accomplished? Do you wish you could deal with crises and interruptions? Than this is the course for you. Organize Your Day to Save Time will help you organize your work and deal with problems as they arise so that you can get more accomplished in your day.


Instructor Led: Dawn Janis

Price: $35.00

Manager Approval Required: Yes

http://talent.houstontx.gov/Saba/Web/COH/goto/GuestOfferingDetails?offeringId=class000000000022467&isFromDeeplink=true

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Business Grammar Prepositions, Pronouns and Confusing Words

Thursday, Jan. 21st 2016 at 8:30am-4:30pm

Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023

Do you wonder what a preposition is and why it is important? Do you find that you match your verb to the wrong word because you are not sure which word is the subject? Do you ask yourself if the word should be its or it’s or your or you’re? Do you struggle with words that sound alike with different spellings? Then this course is for you.


Instructor Led: Dawn Janis

Price: $35.00

Manager Approval Required: Yes

http://talent.houstontx.gov/Saba/Web/COH/goto/GuestOfferingDetails?offeringId=class000000000022470&isFromDeeplink=true

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PowerPoint 2010 - Level 2

Thursday, Jan. 21st 2016 at 8:30am-4:30pm

Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023

If you need to arrange shapes in your PowerPoint presentation, then this course is for you. If you need to use pictures, sounds and other features in your presentation, this course is for you. If you need to add timings to your slides, this course is for you. You will learn all of these and much more.


Instructor Led: Dawn Janis

Price: $35.00

Manager Approval Required: Yes

http://talent.houstontx.gov/Saba/Web/COH/goto/GuestOfferingDetails?offeringId=class000000000022469&isFromDeeplink=true

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Word 2010 - Level 3

Tuesday, Jan. 26th 2016 at 8:30am-4:30pm

Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023

If you need to know how to work with long tables that cover two or more pages, this course is exactly what you need. If you need to work with other users, you will find this course helpful. If you need to create a cover page, a table of contents, or an index, this is the course for you. You will learn all of these and much more.


Instructor Led: Dawn Janis

Price: $35.00

Manager Approval Required: Yes

http://talent.houstontx.gov/Saba/Web/COH/goto/GuestOfferingDetails?offeringId=class000000000022471&isFromDeeplink=true

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Business Grammar Capitalization and Punctuation

Thursday, Jan. 28th 2016 at 8:30am-4:30pm

Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023

When do you capitalize a person’s title or a department? Should you always use a comma before the word, and? How do you know where to use a hyphen? If you have wondered about these, then this course is for you.


Instructor Led: Bonnie Sandberg

Price: $35.00

Manager Approval Required: Yes

http://talent.houstontx.gov/Saba/Web/COH/goto/GuestOfferingDetails?offeringId=class000000000022944&isFromDeeplink=true

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PowerPoint 2010 - Level 3

Thursday, Jan. 28th 2016 at 8:30am-4:30pm

Learning & Development Center | 4501 Leeland Street Houston, TX 77023

Do you wish you could add more flourish to your PowerPoint presentations without making them too busy? Do you need to enhance your charts? Do you need to bring Word documents into PowerPoint? This hands-on class will help you with all of these and much more.


Instructor Led: Dawn Janis

Price: $35.00

Manager Approval Required: Yes

http://talent.houstontx.gov/Saba/Web/COH/goto/GuestOfferingDetails?offeringId=class000000000022946&isFromDeeplink=true

Upcoming Industry Webinars & Events

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Welcome, 2016: The Year of Knowledge, Optimized

Most of us prioritize optimizing our personal lives for performance and efficiency. In 2016, the world of corporate learning is poised to catch up. Today, there are tools being built and refined to take learning and development programs to the next level of greatness.


Join us for this complimentary TrainingIndustry.com webinar. Your host, Rebecca Reagan-Thieme, product manager at Inkling, will make predictions about how new technology will accelerate corporate knowledge in the coming year.

This interactive webinar will provide easy-to-understand insights on:

  • How your company can use new technologies to radically upskill your employees in 2016
  • How new approaches to the knowledge supply chain are changing approaches to learning
  • What “going mobile” really means for users – and your bottom line


About the Speaker:


Rebecca Reagan-Thieme

Rebecca joined Inkling in October 2014 after several years in SAAS enterprise software development, as well as consulting and international relations. She is passionate about improving people's lives through elegant tools, from designing the right process or solution to carefully choosing the second-best tent for her backpacking trips. With an MA in German Literature from NYU, Rebecca has made a career of improving the status quo by integrating multiple perspectives.


Topic: Welcome, 2016: The Year of Knowledge, Optimized

Date: Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Time: 12:00 PM CST

Host: http://www.trainingindustry.com/

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Learners of the Future

Envisioning the future of organizational learning and training calls on learning leaders to artfully apply business savvy, learning know-how, and sheer imagination. When the Association for Talent Development (ATD) and the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) partnered to explore the topic of learners of the future, a robust 59 percent of learning and business leaders surveyed said that in 2020, “Learning will take place in ways we can’t imagine today.” Yet only 38 percent said their learning functions would be ready to effectively meet their organizations’ learning needs five years from now.


Getting the learning and development (L&D) function ready for both the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead involves many considerations: Will tomorrow’s learners arrive in workplaces with solid knowledge and skills employers need? Can organizations act now to influence what educational institutions teach those future workers? How will learning be delivered in 2020? How can L&D support, track, leverage the spread of collaborative and informal learning through social media and mobile technologies? Will the future see learning management systems go away?


This webcast will explore these questions by providing findings from the new ATD and i4cp research report Learners of the Future: Taking Action Today to Prevent Tomorrow’s Training Crisis. It will also take a close look at how learning leaders at leading organizations are preparing now for these upcoming challenges through innovative programs and partnerships and the use of new technologies.


Topic: Learners of the Future

Date: Thursday, January 28, 2016

Time: 1:00 PM EST

Host: https://www.td.org/


About the Speaker:


Carol Morrison, Senior Research Analyst, i4cp and John Cone', Principal, the 11th Hour Group

Senior Research Analyst Carol Morrison is the author of white papers, playbooks, reports, analyses and articles on numerous topics related to business performance covering strategic workforce planning, leadership, talent management, strategy and execution, learning, customer focus, and more. She has contributed extensively to research reports and other projects published by ASTD, the American Management Association (AMA), and HR People & Strategy (HRPS).

Feature articles by Carol can be found in Talent Management Magazine, Chief Learning Officer, HR Executive, and in other leading print and online media. Carol is the author of the 2012 report, Future of HR: The Transition to Performance Advisor and the 2013 ASTD/i4cp report Going Mobile: Creating Practices That Transform Learning.

How to Accelerate Learning Transfer Through Competency-Based Learning

Competency models identify what the organization needs people in a particular role to do in order for the organization to succeed and create competitive advantage. They intrinsically motivate people to achievement. In essence, they provide each person with a road map for how to be great. The responsibility of the talent and learning and development teams is to provide the best chance for learning transfer to occur so that business results follow. If the competency models define the required skills, then you need to make sure you have, or create, competency-based learning.In this webcast, we’ll show you the process for mapping models to learning.


You’ll learn how to:

  • Link competency models to existing learning opportunities.
  • Use competency models to identify learning opportunities you need to develop.
  • Keep your mapping current.


Topic: How to Accelerate Learning Transfer Through Competency-Based Learning

Date: Thursday, February 4, 2016

Time: 12:00 PM CST

Host: https://www.td.org/


About the Speaker:


Cheryl Lasse, Managing Partner, SkillDirector

Cheryl Lasse is SkillDirector’s managing partner, a role she’s held since 2002. Cheryl’s goal is helping people and companies achieve their potential. She believes people are intrinsically motivated to excel, if they are given access to personalized learning and the opportunity to identify skill gaps for the job they have or the job they want. This philosophy has been embodied in the Self-Directed Learning Engine, the engine behind the ATD Career Navigator.


Cheryl has a strong background in consulting, marketing, and sales—mostly in technology companies, where training has played a chief role throughout her career. She holds bachelor degrees from Syracuse University in computer science and HR, and an MBA from the University of South Florida.

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Research Spotlight: Insights into Measurement and Analytics

The datafication of the workforce continues, and software solutions make it increasingly easier to collect and report on that data. But this has only created a new set of challenges for HR professionals. The obvious issues are what data to pay attention to and what to ignore, but there is also the issue of how best to present and explain that data in a way that helps create change.


Cliff Stevenson, Principal Analyst for Workforce Management at Brandon Hall Group, will highlight data from the 2015 HCM Measurement and Analytics Survey which, paired with examples from well-known companies and insights from top solution providers, will help explain the most common analytics issues faced by modern HR professionals and show proven solutions to those issues.


Participants of this webinar will:

  • Learn the most common HR analytics issues
  • Find both typical and creative solutions to handling people data problems
  • Discover trends in HR analytics for 2016
  • Hear some of the possible complications in using people data in the future


Topic: Research Spotlight: Insights into Measurement and Analytics

Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Time: 12:00 p.m. CST

Host: http://brandonhall.com/


About the Speaker:


Cliff Stevenson, Principal Analyst for Workforce Management at Brandon Hall Group

Cliff Stevenson is Principal Analyst, Workforce Management Practice, for Brandon Hall Group. He came to Brandon Hall Group in 2015 from the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) where he was a senior analyst since 2012. Cliff's experience as human capital research analyst has focused on data and analytics, performance management, recruitment, acquisition, retention, and attrition. Before joining i4cp, he was the HR leader for a Boston consulting firm. Cliff received his Master's degree in Organizational Development from Suffolk University and Bachelor's degree in Psychology from the University of South Florida.


His work has appeared in Talent Management Magazine, Human Resources Executive, Businessweek, Fortune magazine, the Washington Post, and Business Insider and many other publications. He is the author of dozens of reports and articles and wrote "The Real Dollar Value of Employee Engagement" in ATD's Integrated Talent Management Scorecards (2013), and "The Age of Big Data and Talent Analytics" in ATD's Talent Management Handbook (2015).

About the Learning and Development Center-The Center for Excellence

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At a glance...

The Learning and Development Center (LDC) develops and provides programs designed to empower and enhance employee skills and competencies for improved performance and job satisfaction. Our services also extend to external businesses, organizations, and communities.


Our mission is to build a world-class, responsive and results-oriented workforce by providing the following:

  • Learning that meets critical business goals and needs
  • Lifelong learning opportunities that will prepare employees for life and work in an increasingly technological society

Facility Features

The LDC is a two-story, 54,000 square foot state-of-the-art facility featuring:

  • An auditorium capable of seating 150 with fold-down desktops
  • Instructor computers connected to HD projectors and the Internet
  • 170 available campus parking spaces
  • Break-room area with microwaves and refrigerators
  • Welcoming lobby area
  • Open atrium for al fresco activities

Internal & External Room Rental Request Forms

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A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future

Lawyers. Accountants. Computer programmers. That’s what our parents encouraged us to become when we grew up. But Mom and Dad were wrong. The future belongs to a very different kind of person with a very different kind of mind. The era of “left brain” dominance, and the Information Age that it engendered, are giving way to a new world in which “right brain” qualities-inventiveness, empathy, meaning-predominate. That’s the argument at the center of this provocative and original book, which uses the two sides of our brains as a metaphor for understanding the contours of our times.


In this insightful and entertaining book, which has been translated into 20 languages, Daniel H. Pink offers a fresh look at what it takes to excel. A Whole New Mind reveals the six essential aptitudes on which professional success and personal fulfillment now depend, and includes a series of hands-on exercises culled from experts around the world to help readers sharpen the necessary abilities. This book will change not only how we see the world but how we experience it as well.

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Fact Check:

We strive for accuracy and fairness. If you see something that doesn't look right, contact us!

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*Opinions expressed in interview statements and messages from featured articles are not necessarily the views of the staff of the LDC or employees of the City of Houston.


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