Clouds!

By:Claire Thompson

High

6 km; small amount of water vapor and low temps. due to the altitude

-thin white and composed of ice crystals

Cirrus; Cirrocumulus; Cirrostratus

Middle

2-6 km, composed of liquid water vapor

alto means middle

Altocumulus; Altostratus

Low

2 km, sometimes occur as individual clouds but more often appear as general overcast

-often widespread and are associated with somber skies and drizzly rain

Types: stratus; stratocumulus; nimbostratus

Vertical

low bases that extend to heights as much as 15 km

indicate very active vertical movements in the air

Types: Cumulus, Cumulonimbus

Fog

A cloud on the ground, 4 types

Radiation Fog- results when the ground loses heat through radiation usually at night

Advection Fog- when warm, moist air moves horizontally over a cold surface such as snow covered ground or a cold ocean

Upslope Fog- created adiabatic cooling occurs when humid air climbs a topographic slope

Evaporation Fog- water vapor is added to cold air that is already near saturation