Syrian Refugees and Saudi Arabia

By: Sydney Rebelsky

Syrian Refugees

There are an estimate of 9 million Syrians that have fled their homes to different areas. Since 2000, Bashar al-Assad has been the dictator of the country. In March 2011, protests began happening. Then, on March 18, 2011, "Syrian security forces opened fire on peaceful protestors in the southern city of Deraa, killing three. Protests grew, and so did the increasingly violent crackdowns" (http://www.vox.com/2015/9/4/9261971/syria-refugee-war). These protests turned into a war by 2012. People have been fleeing the country ever since. And the flow doesn't stop there, people are still continuing to leave 4 years later. They are leaving because their lives are bring threatened and many of their relatives have been killed by the government or ISIS. The issue is we need to find place to put the refugees. Over 9 million have left all ready and the numbers are still rising rapidly.
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Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia Demographics

Population: 31.6 million people


Distribution: 17,407 males - 12,490 females


Population density: 13 people per sq. km


Average age: 27


Age distribution: 30% is 15 or younger - 3% is 65 or older.


Current wealth (GDP): $648.971 billion


Per capita GDP: $20,677


Current job market: 90% of export earnings come from the oil industry. A large percent of the country works in the oil industry.


Unemployment rate: >15 5.7%

How Many Syrian Refugees can Saudi Arabia Take?

The distance from Syria to Saudi Arabia is Approx. 838 miles. Syria and Saudi Arabia are both on the continent Asia, so to get to Saudi Arabia, there is no ocean that needs to be crossed. The estimated time to get there by car is 21 hours and 6 minutes. If you were to go by plane, the time would be 1 hour and 57 minutes. It would make sense for Saudi Arabia to take in Syrian refugees. The distance is very short compared to some of the places the refugees are already going. It would be easy travel. You can go by car, train, plane, or take on the long journey of walking there.


The culture of Syria and Saudi Arabia are pretty similar. They both Arabic as their main launguage. It would be an easier adjustment for the Syrians to relocate to Saudi Arabia. Both have the same national religion as well, Islam. The impact on the population would make the younger side even more populous. The ratio for age distribution is already at 30%-3%. However, I think that Saudi Arabia would still be a good place to have the Syrian refugees.


The number of refugees that the UN should send to Saudi Arabia is 1 Million. I feel that it would be an easy adjustment for the Syrians for all of the reasons mentioned. Also, it would take a lot less to get the refugees there because a boat is not needed to get the refugees there. Although it would be a long journey to get all the way to Saudi Arabia, it is manageable. Although 1 million younger people would impact the population, as long as Saudi Arabia has a little time to prepare, the refugees are able to come here. These people need to get out of their country. Their lives are being threatened and I think a lot of places, including Saudi Arabia can spring to take in some of them.

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Bibliography

The Arab world’s wealthiest nations are doing next to nothing for Syria’s refugees. Retrieved September 25, 2015, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/09/04/the-arab-worlds-wealthiest-nations-are-doing-next-to-nothing-for-syrias-refugees/

Google. Retrieved September 25, 2015, from https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&es_th=1&ie=utf-8#safe=strict&q=how many syrian refugees

Greer, S. Why Isn’t Saudi Arabia Taking In Any Refugees? Retrieved September 25, 2015, from http://dailycaller.com/2015/09/15/why-isnt-saudi-arabia-taking-in-any-migrants/

Why people are fleeing Syria: a brief, simple explanation. (2015, April). Retrieved September 25, 2015, from http://www.vox.com/2015/9/4/9261971/syria-refugee-war