The March Towards Death

By: Mickela Kayea

One Step Closer To Death

Death marches were forced marches for captives or prisoners, with the intention to kill, beat, weaken, and/or demoralize. These marches happened because when the Soviet Union came to liberate the camps other camps did not have time to transport the prisoners by cargo, so by foot they went.
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From Beginning To End

In the picture above you can see all of the routes (darkened) of the marches in Germany that had taken place.


  • January 30, 1933- Hitler was announced as the Chancellor of Germany
  • 1933 the first concentration camp was established
  • September 1, 1939- Germany invaded Poland
  • July 23, 1944- First liberation of Majdanek concentration camp
  • January 18, 1945- Death March begins with the evacuation of Auschwitz- 15,000 dead
  • January 25, 1945- Evacuation and death march from concentration camp Stutthof- 25,000 dead
  • April 7, 1945- Death march from Buchenwald concentration camp- 10,000 dead
  • April 26, 1945- Death March from Dachau after most camps were liberated
  • May 9, 1945- Last camp Stutthof, where the camp was liberated and 100 survivors were left

Citations

  • "Death Marches." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, n.d. Web. 19 May 2016.
  • "Liberation of Nazi Camps." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC, 29 Jan. 2016. Web. 19 May 2016.
  • "Timeline of Events." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, n.d. Web. 19 May 2016.
  • "Stutthof." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 29 Jan. 2016. Web. 19 May 2016.
  • "Auschwitz Liberation 70th Anniversary: History of the Holocaust Death Marches." International Business Times RSS. N.p., 26 Jan. 2015. Web. 19 May 2016.