oh yeah

lip gloss AND LIPS

LET YOUR LIPS SHINE

with these cute and awesome colours.


-bright bloody red

-strawberry hot pink

-or cherry blast

-okay orange

-freaky black

LIPS ARE ONLY BEAUTIFUL IF YOU MAKE UM BEAUTIFUL

ABOUT LIP GLOSS

Lip gloss was invented by Max Factor in 1930. He wanted to create a lip product that would make lips shiny and glossy for films.[1][2] Factor created makeup for the movie industry. He developed makeup specifically for actresses starring in black and white films. Women were inspired by movie actresses and they also wanted make-up. The first commercially available lip gloss was Max Factor's X-Rated, launched in 1932.[3] The original formula was sold up until 2003, when Procter and Gamble retired the product.



Lip gloss in squeezable tube and wand applicator formats




Lip gloss is usually used as a cosmetic, however some offer moisturizing benefits or protection from the elements and other natural causes. Lip gloss containingsunscreen was first advertised by actress Lillian Gush.[citation needed]

In 1973, Bonne Bell introduced the first flavoured lip gloss, Lip Smackers. Lip Smackers were, and still are, popular among young teenagers. Initially Lip Smackers came in two sizes: small and big. The small ones could be kept in the pocket and the big ones had a rope to hang around the neck. It was advertised that before a date, a teen girl should choose an appropriate flavour because that would be her date's first taste when his lips kissed hers.[4]

Natural make-up companies have made progress in creating lip gloss with mainly natural ingredients except for preservatives.

Types[edit]

Like lipstick, lip gloss comes in a variety of forms and may be applied in different ways. It can be contained in a small cylindrical bottle and applied with a rounded or sloped applicator wand (known as a doe foot applicator) or with a built in lip brush. Or it can come in a small, soft, squeezable plastic tube designed to be passed over the lips or applied with a fingertip or lip brush. Solid or semisolid glosses come in boxes and tubes and sometimes blur the distinction between lip gloss and lip balm.

New types of "plumping" lip gloss contain ingredients that make the lips appear softer and plumper. These are a cheap, easy, and usually harmless alternatives to collagen, Restylane, Juvederm, and/or fat injections. They are not as effective, however, and the effects are temporary and short-lasting.

Lip gloss is often used when a person wants to have some color on their lips, but does not want an intense, solid lip color effect (i.e., a more "made-up" look), as lipstick would create. Lip gloss is also often used as an introduction to makeup. It is often used by preteen and young teenage girls who want to wear some makeup, but are too young to wear more intense and different lipstick colors.


THE LIPS PROCESS

Process[edit]

In everyday conversation, people with normal vision, hearing and social skills sub-consciously use information from the lips and face to aid aural comprehension and most fluent speakers of a language are able to speechread to some extent (see McGurk effect). This is because each speech sound (phoneme) has a particular facial and mouth position (viseme), and people can to some extent deduce what phoneme has been produced based on visual cues, even if the sound is unavailable or degraded (e.g. by background noise).

Lipreading while listening to spoken language provides the redundant audiovisual cues necessary to initially learn language, as evidenced by Lewkowicz who in his studies determined that babies between 4 and 8 months of age pay special attention to mouth movements when learning to speak both native and nonnative languages. While after 12 months of age enough audiovisual cues have been attained that they no longer have to look at the mouth when encountering a native language, hearing a nonnative language spoken again prompts this shift to visual and auditory engagement by way of lipreading and listening in order to process, understand and produce speech. [1]

Research has shown that, as expected, deaf adults are better at lipreading than hearing adults due to their increased practice and heavier reliance on lip reading in order to understand speech. However when the same research team conducted a similar study with children it was determined that deaf and hearing children have similar lip reading skills. It is only after 14 years of age that skill levels between deaf and hearing children begin to differentiate significantly, indicating that lipreading skill in early life is independent of auditory capability. This may indicate a deterioration in lip reading ability with age for hearing individuals or an increased efficiency in lip reading ability with age for deaf individuals.[2]

Lipreading has been proven to not only activate the visual cortex of the brain, but also the auditory cortex in the same way when actual speech is heard. Research has showed that rather than have clearcut different regions of the brain dedicated to different senses, the brain works in a mutisensory fashion, thus making a coordinated effort to consider and combine all the different types of speech information it receives, regardless of modality. Therefore, as hearing captures more articulatory detail than sight or touch the brain uses speech and sound to compensate for other senses.[3]

Speechreading is limited, however, in that many phonemes share the same viseme and thus are impossible to distinguish from visual information alone. Sounds whose place of articulation is deep inside the mouth or throat are not detectable, such as glottal consonants and most gestures of the tongue. Voiced and unvoiced pairs look identical, such as [p] and [b], [k] and [g], [t] and [d], [f] and [v], and [s] and [z]; likewise for nasalisation (e.g. [m] vs. [b]). It has been estimated that only 30% to 40% of sounds in the English language are distinguishable from sight alone.

Thus, for example, the phrase "where there's life, there's hope" looks identical to "where's the lavender soap" in most English dialects. Author Henry Kisor titled his book What's That Pig Outdoors?: A Memoir of Deafness in reference to mishearing the question, "What's that big loud noise?" He used this example in the book to discuss the shortcomings of speechreading.[4]

As a result, a speechreader must depend heavily on cues from the environment, from the context of the communication, and a knowledge of what is likely to be said. It is much easier to speechread customary phrases such as greetings or a connected discourse on a familiar topic than utterances that appear in isolation and without supporting information, such as the name of a person never met before.

Difficult scenarios in which to speechread include:

  • Lack of a clear view of the speaker's lips. This includes:
    • obstructions such as moustaches or hands in front of the mouth
    • the speaker's head turned aside or away
    • dark environment
    • a bright back-lighting source such as a window behind the speaker, darkening the face.
  • Group discussions, especially when multiple people are talking in quick succession. The challenge here is to know where to look.
  • use of an unusual tone or rhythm of speech by the speaker


Lip Gloss Commercial

TYPES

Like lipstick, lip gloss comes in a variety of forms and may be applied in different ways. It can be contained in a small cylindrical bottle and applied with a rounded or sloped applicator wand (known as a doe foot applicator) or with a built in lip brush. Or it can come in a small, soft, squeezable plastic tube designed to be passed over the lips or applied with a fingertip or lip brush. Solid or semi solid glosses come in boxes and tubes and sometimes blur the distinction between lip gloss and lip balm.

New types of "pumping" lip gloss contain ingredients that make the lips appear softer and plumper. These are a cheap, easy, and usually harmless alternatives to collagen, Restylane, Juvederm, and/or fat injections. They are not as effective, however, and the effects are temporary and short-lasting.

Lip gloss is often used when a person wants to have some colour on their lips, but does not want an intense, solid lip colour effect (i.e...e., a more "made-up" look), as lipstick would create. Lip gloss is also often used as an introduction to makeup. It is often used by preteen and young teenage girls who want to wear some makeup, but are too young to wear more intense and different lipstick colours.