Ketamine

By: Kyle Archambault & Bobby Grogis

Big image

What is Ketamine?

Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic and has some hallucinogenic effects. While under the influence of the substance there is potential for sense distortion, and disconnection from life in the user's perspective. Ketamine is used for its hallucinogenic impacts but also it takes away pain and makes pain hard to feel. Many people experience undetected serious injuries because ketamine is so strongly dulling the pain and that is part of what makes this drug dangerous.


Street Names


  • Cat Tranquilizer
  • Jet
  • Jet K
  • Kit Kat
  • Purple
  • Special K
  • Vitamin K

How Ketamine is Administered

Medical Uses for Ketamine

It was used in the 1970's as a battlefield anesthetic. Now a day scientist are figuring out that it could be used to help treat patients with depression.
Ketamine the new wonder drug to treat depression?

Legal Status

Ketamine is under the category Schedule III for drugs. The other substances in this category have been categorized by the fact that they have less potential for addiction than other substances. These substances also can only lead to low or moderate physiological dependence as opposed to other drugs like heroin. Ketamine is only legal to be used by doctors or research professionals.

How Long Does it Last and Effects?

When administered, depending on how it is, and the dosage, the average ketamine high lats for about one hour. This high begins 2 to 5 minutes after ingestion. In the beginning a user will feel relaxed and a full body buzz. Long term there are some impacts that are dangerous outside of the high itself. People can build up a tolerance if they use the same dosage all the time. If a person uses 2000 mLg they will create a tolerance to any effect the drug would have. Also very dangerous if combined with alcohol the effects are doubled.

Support System

To date there is no FDA approved medications to treat addiction. There are regular rehabilitation centers that one could visit. But if you are one who is addicted and need help just call this number 800-601-3889.

Works Cited

Gale. N.p.: n.p., 2010. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. <http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&display-query=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&u=amhe95753rpa&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&displayGroups=&sortBy=&source=&search_within_results=&p=SCIC&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2645000027>.

"Ketamine." DEA.gov. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2016. <http://www.dea.gov/druginfo/drug_data_sheets/Ketamine.pdf>.

"Ketamine." Drug.laws.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2016. <http://drugs.laws.com/ketamine>.

"Ketamine." Teen Health & Wellness. N.p., June 2015. Web. 23 Mar. 2016. <http://www.teenhealthandwellness.com/article/201?search=ketamine>.

"Ketamine- Drug Prevention." druginfo.adf.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2016. <http://www.druginfo.adf.org.au/drug-facts/ketamine>.

Sutton, Jen, LPC,LAC, ed. "Drugs and Sexual Assault." Teen Health and Wellness. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2016. <http://www.teenhealthandwellness.com/article/139/2?search=ketamine>.

Bellum, Sara. “Real Teens Ask: What Are Designer Drugs?” NIDA for teens. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Mar. 2016. <http://teens.drugabuse.gov/blog/post/real-teens-ask-what-are-designer-drugs>.

“Commonly Abused Drugs Charts.” HIH. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Mar. 2016. <https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/commonly-abused-drugs-charts>.

“The Dangerous Interaction of Ketamine and Alcohol.” Ketamine. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Mar. 2016. <http://ketamine.com/ketamine-facts/the-dangerous-interaction-of-ketamine-and-alcohol/>.

“Ketamine.” CESAR. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Mar. 2016. <http://www.cesar.umd.edu/cesar/drugs/ketamine.asp>.