Ancient Roman F&Q`s

Proserpine Flamont

Writing

The Romans did`nt have paper, so they had to improvise using a plant called Papyrus. When they wanted to write they had to use a peice of papyrus with a quil dipped in ink, or they could use a wax slab with a tool they called a stylus.

Family

Roman families were somewhat different from our modern families today. Did you know that the children belonged to their father, until the mother and father divorced. The Romans believed that if they had a son it was a sign that the gods blessed the marriage. Also, when the child were born the mother would place the child at the feet of the father and the father would decide whether or not he would except the child, but if the father did`nt pick the child up the mother would place the child in the elements and hope maybe someone would take them. Unlike today where we have only have our first name and last name. The Romans had 3 names.The roman names were either complex or simple.

Clothing: Men`s and Boy`s

Roman men and boys wore what is called a "Tunic". The roman men and boys would wear a toga in public. The difference between the two was one was used to wear in their house, and the other to show status in public. Togas were usually white and only a select few were aloud to wear a purple toga, which was mostly worn by the emperor. Roman men and boys also wore one type of jewelry called a signet ring. The signet ring was used to make impressions in sealing was in order to authorize documents.

CLOTHING: Woman`s and Girl`s

Girls did`nt really wear much. They wore a tunic with a toga, that usually had purple stitched into the fabric to ward off evil. Woman and girls would also wear all of the jewelry there soon to be husband (fiance) would give them. In public this showed that she was taken and soon to be married.

Citations

"Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


"The Nature of the Family." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 324-325. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


"Names, Roman System of." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 3. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 66-67. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


"Names." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 181-182. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.


The Dress of Roman Women." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 106-109. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2

"Clothing." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 268-271. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.015.

Barbara F. McManus, The College of New Rochelle

bmcmanus@cnr.edu

revised August, 2003